"Hillary Clinton has an 85% chance to win," was the headline that graced the top of the New York Times site at 10 P.M. on November 8, 2016, alongside a graphic of Clinton and Trump's faces with their individual percentages of winning the race for President. A smiling Trump was placed above a pathetic 15%. The Times explained that this conclusion was based on a combination of the most recent state and national polls. They elaborated, "Mrs. Clinton's chance of losing is about the same as the probability that an NFL kicker misses a 37-yard field goal."

The stats were a compilation of several of the most highly regarded and trusted election forecasters like FiveThirtyEight, the Princeton Election Consortium, the Cook Political Report, among others.

As election night progressed and state results flowed in, a mood shift was seriously prevalent on channels like MSNBC and CNN. Commentary grew from confident talks of America's first "Madam President," to worry, shock, and dismay. Not only was a Trump presidency historic in that Trump seriously deviated from the norm of scripted, rehearsed, and "politically correct" career politician candidates, but relatively every single poll that predicted the results of the election were inaccurate. Besides anticipating a Clinton win, the polls predicted a landslide victory.

The polls weren't just slightly skewed, they were useless.

What was so ironic about the 2016 election was that the liberal media and Clinton supporters who relied on the accuracy of polling and popular opinion on social media in determining how the United States felt about Trump are a perfect representation of how the polls got it so wrong. There's a reason that Republicans are called "The silent majority," and it's because a great bulk of our news media and Democrats in our country are hateful towards and disrespectful of Republican voters. Media makes them feel socially rejected. What results is a party full of "silent" supporters. Voters are afraid to voice their political opinions in the face of backlash.

In the age of Trump, a candidate who refused to be censored or silenced, liberal media fought back with hateful rhetoric. Denoting him to be racist, sexist, homophobic, islamophobic, etc., and further, establishing that all of his supporters must be the same. Clinton herself went as far as to say they all were "deplorable" and "irredeemable."

A major determinant of the predictions being so wrong was completely ignored; why, as a Trump supporter, would you announce yourself as such after hearing that is what mainstream media proclaims you to be?

As the mass of potential Democratic candidates and Trump begin to pick up campaign efforts ahead of the 2020 election, the same pattern of events that polls and Democrats fell victim to in 2016 is starting to emerge once again. Scrolling through sites like Twitter and Facebook or switching through channels like CNN, MSNBC, CBS, etc., content seems to heavily solely represent the population that dislikes, even hates, President Trump. It appears as if (if that was all you had to base a prediction off of), just as it did in 2016, President Trump faces a serious disadvantage in winning a second term. The only difference in 2020 will be that those opinions will represent even less of the voter demographic, giving Trump victory by far greater electoral college margins.

Why? Because his success as President speaks for itself. Minority unemployment in America is at record low levels, the unemployment rate is the lowest it has been in five decades, almost 4 million jobs have been created since November 2016, Women's unemployment is at its lowest rate in 65 years, an increase in American's access to affordable healthcare through association health plans, all as his administration delivered the largest package of tax cuts in history, helping low and median-income households across the nation.

You won't find talk of the President's accomplishments on most news stations or online outlets though, and no matter what he does, the media refuses to stray from their negative coverage. Even though they won't acknowledge the benefits of a Trump economy, Americans are. At Trump's recent rally in Florida to announce his bid for a second term, 150,000 supporters requested tickets to be in attendance despite the venue's capacity at around 20,000. The venue was packed, and the crowd was electric.

In comparison, Biden — generally accepted to be the Democratic frontrunner — has recently drawn crowds between 5 and 6,000. And at home? Fox News, a generally conservative and Republican channel, has begun to see prime-time viewership at numbers greater than CNN and MSNBC combined.

It's reasonable to predict another historic win for President Trump, secured by Americans who know how his administration has benefitted them, their economy, and their families. Even as popular liberal media refuses to evolve with a populous they hardly represent nor understand anymore.