The Trichotomy Of College Transportation

The Trichotomy Of College Transportation

Scooters are the best...but why?
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To go ahead and give you the answer that you want, here it is: SCOOTERS.

The best transportation for college students, out of the big three, is undoubtedly scooters. We will call these people “scooterers”.

BUT WHY? WHY NOT THE OTHERS??? But...but he was a sk8er boy? The Tour de France?

Nope, none of that is relevant. If you want the true, unabridged reasons as to why scooters are the best, then let me first explain why the others are not.

1. BIKES

Ok, so a bike is probably the least practical mode of transportation on a relatively tight campus (aka you don’t have to go miles for a class). What could possibly be wrong with a bike though?

  1. Bikes are big and have to be stored outside normally, this can often lead to bikes getting stolen.
  2. You are going to be late for class? Ok, so you rush over on your bike and you make it at 12:58pm, just before your 1pm class. You totally would have time to make it there on a scooter that you would just bring into the class to store, but alas, you have to lock your bike. Which could normally only take a minute, but then, oh no, you’re so rushed that you fumble and drop the key or something and it takes too long. BOOM, you're late.
  3. If you forget your key to your lock EVER, you are at risk for it to be stolen while you go inside wherever you go.
  4. Maybe you want to go pick up some food, but then you feel weird leaving your bike outside...even with the lock..a wasted trip.

While I made these sound like doomsday occurrences, I just wanted to drive the point home that bikes are generally a hassle, and other options are simply...simpler.

2. SKATEBOARDS

Avril Lavigne (the original one, not the new one...have you heard the conspiracy?) would have me beheaded if this were ancient times and she were a queen, but these are not ancient times. So, the queen can only watch in dismay as I outline why skateboards just aren’t the move.

  1. Admittedly, there are less reasons why skateboards aren’t the best choice, but there are still reasons...such as the sheer possibility of destruction to your body. What do I mean? Falling off the skateboard. It’s common, and I feel like I don’t need to describe, just ask a friend who skates.
  2. Skateboards are hard to ride for a lot of people. Keeping balance on two feet can be a task for even the most intelligent humans, so adding four wheels and a few inches of elevation to the mix does not help at all.
  3. ROUGH TERRAIN. May skaters beware...many schools and universities have weird or cracking pavement, brick, rocks, and other unfriendly topography that collegiate riders have to watch out for. The skateboard is the weakest link in this area, often resulting in a wipeout or the much more minor inconvenience disengagement of having to walk the distance of the rough patch.

3. SCOOTERS

Well hello, you have finally made it to the section where I explain the superiority of scooters. I must say, I have no feelings of animosity toward anyone who does not ride/use a scooter, but I think scooters have not been awarded their fare share of credibility, so I have to be extreme.

  1. Scooters are generally light-weight, portable, and can even be stylish. I have my own in hot pink, it consistently gets me looks. Those looks range from “heck yeah” to “I really was not expecting to be visually assaulted by this but...respect.”
  2. Scooters don’t need an extra lock or anything, so when you arrive to your class building 2 minutes before you need to go in, there’s no time wasted wasted locking it up outside!
  3. Unlike skateboards, scooters come with a convenient handle to hold onto. So, you can push with your feet and stare ahead to your destination without feeling like you are going to plummet to the hard and unforgiving ground beneath your speeding toes.
  4. ***IMPORTANT*** scooters, with LARGE WHEELS (like the Razor A5 Lux), can avoid the unsteadiness of uneven terrain and can generally glide over “bumpy bois” and other ground obstacles, as long as mild caution is used.

ALRIGHT, so if none of that convinced you to like scooters the most...it’s okay. Just give my fellow scooterer a break the next time you see one. These rides are eco-friendly and I support all of them, I just love my scooter too much to not let y’all know why it’s the best.

Have fun on the streets, sidewalks, pathways, etc...and remember, don’t text and ride!

Cover Image Credit: Pxhere

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22 New Things That I Want To Try Now That I'm 22

A bucket list for my 22nd year.

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"I don't know about you but I'm feelin' 22," I have waited 6 long years to sing that and actually be 22! Now 22 doesn't seem like a big deal to people because you can't do anything that you couldn't do before and you're still super young. But I'm determined to make my 22nd year a year filled with new adventures and new experiences. So here's to 22.

1. Go sky diving.

What's crazier than jumping out of a plane? (Although I'll probably try indoor skydiving first.)

2. Go cliff jumping/diving.

I must be the only Rhode Islander who hasn't gone to Jamestown and jumped off a cliff.

3. Ride in a hor air balloon.

Up, up and away.

4. Try out skiing.

Cash me in the next Olympics, how bout dat.

5. Try out snow boarding.

Shawn White, I'm coming for you.

6. Go bungee jumping.

Because at least this time I'll be attached to something.

7. Go to Portugal.

I mean I'm Portuguese so I have to go at some point, right?

8. Go to Cape Verde.

Once again, I'm Cape Verdean so I have to go.

9. Vist one of the seven wonders of the world.

I mean hey, Egypt's on, my bucket list.

10. Try out surfing.

It's only natural that somebody from the Ocean State knows how to surf.

11. Learn a new langauge.

Because my little bit of Portuguese, Spanish and Latin isn't cutting it anymore.

12. Travel to a state that I've never been to before.

Fun fact: I've only been to 17 of the 50 states.

13. Go paddle boarding.

Pretty boring but I've never done it.

14. Go scuba diving.

I'm from the Ocean State so I guess I should see the ocean up close and personal.

15. Learn how to line dance.

There's actually a barn in my state that does line dancing, so this one will definitely get crossed off.

16. Go kayaking.

All this water around me and I haven't done a lot of the water activites.

17. Stay the night in a haunted hotel room.

I bet if I got my friends to come with me, it would be like the Suite Life of Zach and Cody episode, minus the ghost coming out of the wall but you never know.

18. Get my palms read.

Because who doesn't want to know their future.

19. Go to a medium.

Like a medium that can communicate with people that have died.

20. Take a helicopter ride.

Air plane: check Helicopter:....

21. Sleep under the stars.

Because sleeping in a tent is more like glamping than camping

22. Just to try new things in my everyday life.

Whether it's trying a new restaurant, getting something different at my usual restaurants, changing my usual style, going on the scary rides at amusement parks, and bringing things I used to do back into my life now.

Cover Image Credit:

Author's illustration

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I Have No Label

Labels aren't for everyone, and I'm one of them.

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There's a huge pressure from society for people to know things about themselves—what they want to do with their life, what career they want to be tethered to, where they plan on being five years from now—that we really shouldn't add more pressure by requiring people to know their sexual orientation and gender identity.

I've always been pretty comfortable with my gender, but my sexuality? I'm still figuring that one out. I grew up in a fairly conservative home, so I was never exposed to the LGBT+ community or anything similar to it. Straight was the only way to go, and I grew up completely fine with that. It's only now that I know I'm not, that I'm realizing some of the things I did, probably should have told me I wasn't sooner.

Thankfully, it was never a huge source of stress for me because I was OK with being straight. I was fine with the idea of only being into men because I mostly still am. It's just that "mostly" bit that has me thrown off.

If I'm not fully into just guys, does that make me bisexual? What's the full difference between them, anyway? What does "bi" really imply, anyway? Two? Which two? Does the "bi" aspect of the word "bisexual" even really matter?

Do people identify as "pansexual" because the distinction of "bi" is misleading since there are more than just two genders?

Speaking of genders, would I date someone whose gender identity doesn't conform to the binary? How about a transgender person? How can I really know this for a fact without dating someone like that?

All of these thoughts gave me countless headaches, and they still do if I think too hard about it. Since I'm still discovering myself, I'm not fully comfortable labeling my sexuality as anything other than "not straight."

That should be totally fine.

If anything, I think this should be encouraged. It puts way less stress on people who are already stressed beyond belief. It shouldn't be something that a person has to know immediately, and they shouldn't have to ever label themselves if they aren't comfortable with it.

Let people explore their sexuality and gender. If they find a label early, let them. They may change it later. They may not. As long as they're happy with it, what does it matter? Why tell them "no?" Even if you're their parent or caregiver, you should at least be fine with them exploring their own identity and figuring their life out.

It's healthy, and ultimately, it will make them a happier person to know they had support for the whole wild ride.

Respect people if they find nothing and choose to stay label-less.

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c1.staticflickr.com

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