To My Fellow Extroverted Introverts AKA The Social Butterflies That Like To Go Out But Also Want To Be In Bed All Day

To My Fellow Extroverted Introverts AKA The Social Butterflies That Like To Go Out But Also Want To Be In Bed All Day

Sometimes running your mouth all day takes a toll on you.
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Whenever the question, "Are you an introvert or an extrovert?" is tossed around, anyone who remotely knew me would consider me an extrovert without hesitation. However, to me, I find this question a little trickier to answer.

Sure, I love being around and meeting new people. I find it pretty easy to start conversation and would overall consider myself a pretty social person. While these are all considered extroverted traits, I find that I don't think I fit the definition of a traditional extrovert. In fact, I think I have more introverted tendencies.

However, I am anything but shy. I don't get my energy from people; in fact, being around people all day exhausts me. I need my alone time, I cherish it. I'm not trying to be rude, but sometimes I just my own space. To be honest, I'm my favorite person to hang out with. It's kind of a 180 switch from being the person that's always talking, but running your mouth all day can take a toll on you. My friends like to joke with me that I have a split personality.

Is it considered being antisocial if sometimes all I wanna do is curl up and binge my new favorite show? I don't really like to talk about myself and personal issues, I find it really hard to open up to people. However, if you want to talk about your problems or learn some random facts about me, I'm all about it. Just don't expect me to dive into my entire life with you right away. I'm not my favorite topic of conversation.

Most people have the common misconception that introverts are shy. In fact, they aren't always interconnected. Being shy doesn't mean you don't want to be around people and not needing to be around people doesn't mean you're shy. In fact, I'm probably one of the most obnoxious people I know, I just hate being around people for the entirety of a day.

So, for all of you social butterflies that like to go out but also want to be in bed all day, I'm with you. You're not the only one. We just need others to know to take time and realize that we need our space. We still like to have fun, we just might have to go home early. We want to tell you all our secrets, we just need to wait. At the end of the day, we really are just introverts with incredible social skills, and that's okay.

Cover Image Credit: Public Domain Pictures

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'As A Woman,' I Don't Need To Fit Your Preconceived Political Assumptions About Women

I refuse to be categorized and I refuse to be defined by others. Yes, I am a woman, but I am so much more.

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It is quite possible to say that the United States has never seen such a time of divisiveness, partisanship, and extreme animosity of those on different sides of the political spectrum. Social media sites such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter are saturated with posts of political opinions and are matched with comments that express not only disagreement but too often, words of hatred. Many who cannot understand others' political beliefs rarely even respect them.

As a female, Republican, college student, I feel I receive the most confusion from others regarding my political opinions. Whenever I post or write something supporting a conservative or expressing my right-leaning beliefs and I see a comment has been left, I almost always know what words their comment will begin with. Or in conversation, if I make my beliefs known and someone begins to respond, I can practically hear the words before they leave their mouth.

"As a woman…"

This initial phrase is often followed by a question, generally surrounding how I could publicly support a Republican candidate or maintain conservative beliefs. "As a woman, how can you support Donald Trump?" or "As a woman, how can you support pro-life policies?" and, my personal favorite, "As a woman, how did you not want Hillary for president?"

Although I understand their sentiment, I cannot respect it. Yes, being a woman is a part of who I am, but it in no way determines who I am. My sex has not and will not adjudicate my goals, my passions, or my work. It will not influence the way in which I think or the way in which I express those thoughts. Further, your mention of my sex as the primary logic for condemning such expressions will not change my adherence to defending what I share. Nor should it.

To conduct your questioning of my politics by inferring that my sex should influence my ideology is not only offensive, it's sexist.

It disregards my other qualifications and renders them worthless. It disregards my work as a student of political science. It disregards my hours of research dedicated to writing about politics. It disregards my creativity as an author and my knowledge of the subjects I choose to discuss. It disregards the fundamental human right I possess to form my own opinion and my Constitutional right to express that opinion freely with others. And most notably, it disregards that I am an individual. An individual capable of forming my own opinions and being brave enough to share those with the world at the risk of receiving backlash and criticism. All I ask is for respect of that bravery and respect for my qualifications.

Words are powerful. They can be used to inspire, unite, and revolutionize. Yet, they can be abused, and too comfortably are. Opening a dialogue of political debate by confining me to my gender restricts the productivity of that debate from the start. Those simple but potent words overlook my identity and label me as a stereotype destined to fit into a mold. They indicate that in our debate, you cannot look past my sex. That you will not be receptive to what I have to say if it doesn't fit into what I should be saying, "as a woman."

That is the issue with politics today. The media and our politicians, those who are meant to encourage and protect democracy, divide us into these stereotypes. We are too often told that because we are female, because we are young adults, because we are a minority, because we are middle-aged males without college degrees, that we are meant to vote and to feel one way, and any other way is misguided. Before a conversation has begun, we are divided against our will. Too many of us fail to inform ourselves of the issues and construct opinions that are entirely our own, unencumbered by what the mainstream tells us we are meant to believe.

We, as a people, have become limited to these classifications. Are we not more than a demographic?

As a student of political science, seeking to enter a workforce dominated by men, yes, I am a woman, but foremost I am a scholar, I am a leader, and I am autonomous. I refuse to be categorized and I refuse to be defined by others. Yes, I am a woman, but I am so much more.

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National Coming Out Day Is Not A Requirement For LGBTQ+ Individuals

If a person so chooses, they can live their whole life in the closet.

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National Coming Out Day has been something I have witnessed for a few years now, and though I support the idea behind it, I have come to realize I am not a huge fan of the day in general.

I am all for the idea that we have a day where anyone who wants to come out and has felt ready to come out can and will be greeted with mostly open arms. The concept of a nationwide acceptance of members of the LGBT community is a great concept and a great thing in practice. This concept is not what bothers me. What bothers me is the expectation that anyone who is a member of the LGBTQ community must come out. This concept behind the day bothers me greatly.

Nobody is required to come out publicly. Nobody is required to announce to the world their sexuality and/or identity. Nobody is entitled to the knowledge of someone's sexuality for identity. If a person so chooses, they can live their whole life in the closet. Closet doors are not required to open for people in the LGBTQ community. No straight person is required to explain they sexuality for identity to people on social media or in person, so why do we have an entire day dedicated to requiring members of the LGBTQ community to explain theirs?

National Coming Out Day is not a bad thing. It is a good way to let members of the LGBTQ community know that coming out is acceptable. But to expect these individuals to come out on a day assigned to them is unnecessary.

Coming out is a personal decision from every person individually, and nobody is required to explain their sexuality or identity on an assigned day. It is always a personal decision an individual must come to on their own.

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