3 Tips From The Writer’s Bible That Can Be Used In Conversation

3 Tips From The Writer’s Bible That Can Be Used In Conversation

If talking had a font, would your voice be serif or sans-serif?
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When I think about how I got my start in writing and found my passion, my most vivid memory depicts my high school journalism teacher screaming “There is no excuse to use exclamation points!” at the frightened freshman class. He terrified me, but I became a better writer. Why? Because it’s difficult to forget something if it’s presented to you at a loud enough volume. I still use exclamation points, though.

After applying the style tips I’ve gathered throughout the years, I’ve found myself using them in conversations as well.

The concept of thinning out the fluff from a piece of writing is my favorite. We’ve all heard people go on for what seems like half an hour explaining something when it could have taken them half the time to do so. My go-to phrase when I experience this with fellow writers: “Elements of Style by Strunk & White. Omit needless words”. If you can condense your idea or story, do it. Give the reader or listener the instant gratification. More likely than not, they’ll get a better understanding what you’re trying to say this way.

This brings me to my next style tip for conversations: avoid using complex words or foreign languages. Writers use this for the same reason we think it’s best to use foreign languages. Just like the concept of “omit needless words”, the point is to make your message as clear as possible.

In high school, I had a teacher who thought he had a degree from Harvard, but reality told a different story. He used unnecessarily complicated words and vague phrases and never explained what they meant until it was time to complete an assignment. Is it just me, or is googling your teacher’s choice of words an interactive part of lectures these days? I couldn’t continue listening until I found out what he was talking about, and lost bits and pieces of the message.

When people use fancy words for no reason, I feel like Hemingway talking about Faulkner.

“Poor Faulkner. Does he really think big emotions come from big words? He thinks I don’t know the ten-dollar words. I know them all right. But there are older and simpler and better words, and those are the ones I use.”

If your audience isn’t bilingual, why say, “She was a bona fide expert in American history” when you can replace it with “genuine” or “respected?” Sure, you might sound smarter or like you have a master’s degree from an Ivy League school, but you risk the listener feeling uncomfortable and unable to keep up with the conversation if they’re not familiar with the term.

It’s like when you go to the doctor and they explain the problem, and then you have to say something along the lines of “So what exactly is wrong with me?” or, “Sorry, I don’t speak doctor.”, and then they dumb it down so you can actually take steps to get better. The average patient doesn’t have a medical degree and therefore doesn’t know all the jargon.

Finally, let’s talk about conversation length versus quality. As long as it holds together, a paragraph may be of any length — a single, short sentence or a passage of great duration. The same can be said for an idea or a conversation. There’s no standard for how big an idea has to be or how long the conversation must go on.

I could break the paragraph right here, for example.

Sometimes you have a quick thought that needs sharing. It’s perfectly fine to make the conversation short and sweet. Avoid the small talk if it’s going to cause you anxiety. After all, the fluff will distract from your main point. When speaking about something important, be short, sweet, and to the point.

“I enjoyed my time at the tea party, but not at the dinner.” Gives the same basic idea as “I savored my time at the early afternoon tea party, but the dinner portion of the party was certainly not as pleasant.”

We’re all communicators by nature, but sometimes we forget to embrace the comma, pause for a minute, and re-work our thoughts into words. There might not be an “Elements of Style” for life, but how we write about it is a pretty good place to start.

Cover Image Credit: Unsplash

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I'm A Christian Girl And I'm Not A Feminist, Because God Did Not Intend For Women To Be Equals

It is OK for me to not want to be equivalent with a man.

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To start off, I am not writing this to bash feminists or get hate messages. I am simply writing this to state why I do not perceive myself as a feminist.

March is International Women's Month and that is what has got me thinking about how I view myself as a young woman in the 21st century. I enjoy every day getting to soak up the world as a young lady, particularly in the South.

If you know me, then you know that I love and utterly adore Jesus. He is so perfect. He is everything. He is my whole life. Some people might say that I am a "Bible-thumper" or someone who has had too much Kool-aid and maybe I am, but I know who my Creator is and that He died for me, and that is all that matters.

In my young age, I loved to just sit in church with my parents and absorb all that God would deliver. As I have grown up, I have ventured off and joined a church that is different than my parents, so the responsibility falls more on me, but I love that. Since this era of independence began, I have thoroughly enjoyed taking ownership of my faith.

I spend a lot of time chatting with God, worshipping Him in all kinds of ways, and just diving deeper into His Word. Through all of this growth as a Christian, I have learned a lot, but something I have learned is a concept that some may not agree with, which does not surprise me.

I do not believe God meant for women and men to be equal.

There, I acknowledged the elephant in the room.

It is a shocker, I know, but I have some Biblical evidence to back up this belief that I have.

Let us begin in Genesis. God created man and then he created woman. This was two separate occurrences and order is key. He created Adam and then Eve.

Jesus treated women with grace and kindness, do not get me wrong. I mean just look at how He treated the woman at the well, the one who used all of her expensive perfume to cleanse His feet and not to mention His own biological mother! He has a truly unique place in his heart for women, but He also has special intentions for us in the world and in the family setting.

We are to submit to our husbands.

We are to be energetic, strong, and a hard worker.

We are to be busy and helpful to those in need.

We are to be fearless.

All of this is explicitly laid out by God in Proverbs 31.

We are not to be equal to our male counterparts. Jesus does not lay out the Proverbs 31 man, but He rather lays out the Proverbs 31 woman.

A husband or man is to be the head of the household as Christ is to the church.

A man is to love a woman so deeply that represents how he loves himself.

A man is to leave his father and mother.

Women and men are not equal in God's eyes, but they each represent Him in their own ways that the other needs.

If we were all equal, we would not need one another and therefore we would not need God. I am so thankful that we were not created equal. I am so thankful that God is so great that He could not just create only man or woman to represent His image. He is so perfect.

So, you see I am not a feminist, and it is OK.

It is acceptable for me to have this belief that God intended for men to lead women. It is also okay for people to have differing opinions. Writing this was not easy, but I know that not all people agree.

To feminists and those that are not, you are allowed to believe whatever you wish but have evidence to back it up.

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My Relationship With Religion Will Never Be Black And White

and that's okay!

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I was raised Christian let's get that out the way. Growing up in a small town I went to Awana (a children's church group Wednesday nights) and then once I was in middle school started youth group that night instead as well as a normal church on Sundays. If you would ask me from me being really young to probably around 15 I was all about church and building a relationship with God.

After leaving public school and growing my presence online and meeting so many people from all walks of life, I started questioning things.

Suddenly, I was immersed in this community with the best people who just loved everyone regardless of gender or sexuality or race and it was the place I was able to come to terms with something I had always repressed, my feelings towards girls.

I knew the moment I started talking to a girl named Laura that I had feelings for her I would normally have for a boy and because of the people I now had around me I just didn't suppress it. I identified online and eventually to family and friends as bisexual.

My questions started with wondering how my god this loving all knowing entity I had always known was un-accepting and promoted the exclusion of the LGBTQ+ community from the Christian faith. I knew that this community was full of the most loving and creative and beautiful people I have ever met and that was the start of me knowing my relationship with God would never be the same.

As I grew up and have become an activist for the things that mean a lot to me I have stopped attending church and have begun to see that I do not want any part in ANY religion that takes part in shunning anyone based on how they identify. I have been vocal about this to many people some more excepting then others but regardless I will never again take part in something that I myself am not 100% accepted within

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