6 Annoying Questions Every Person From Las Vegas Understands

6 Annoying Questions Every Person From Las Vegas Understands

"WhAt hOtEl dId YoU LiVe iN?"

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Being from Las Vegas is arguably the coolest thing about me, or at least that's how it seems because as soon as someone finds out where I'm from it's all they want to talk about. *Insert eye roll here*

Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love Las Vegas and it can be useful to have it in my back pocket as a conversation starter or a fun fact for the first day of classes. Being from there has given me really cool opportunities that I would've never had if I'd been from some small town in the middle of nowhere. I mean, literally every artist I've ever loved has had a tour stop there; it's pretty sweet.

Nonetheless, being from a place like Las Vegas also means being bombarded with ridiculous questions that, when you really think about it, make absolutely no sense. So, if you've ever wondered what it's like to be from Las Vegas, it typically goes a little like this.

1. "What hotel do you live in?"

This is by far the most outrageous question, and you'd think there is no way someone would actually ask that. You'd be wrong. Depending on my mood, sometimes I like to make up an answer just to see the look on someone's face when I tell them I grew up living in the Penthouse Suite of the Belliago.

2. "Wait... people actually LIVE there?"

Nope. No one lives there. It's not a town. The people that you see working in all those casinos? Fake. It's shocking, really.

3. "Do they have (insert normal town thing here) there??"

The first time I was sitting in a college class and someone asked me "do they have schools there?" I literally was in disbelief. How could I have possibly made it to college if I didn't have schools in my town? Unbelievable.

4. "I've always wanted to come to Vegas! Can I stay with you?"

Oh absolutely person I just met! Let's have a week long sleepover so you don't have to pay to get a hotel! Great idea!

5. "Wow was it just SO fun growing up there?"

A couple of things on this point: First of all, people seem to forget that the legal drinking and gambling age is 21. EVERYWHERE. ESPECIALLY IN LAS VEGAS!! I didn't grow up going to gamble when I was 7, get real. Another thing, as a local, I really never went to the strip growing up except for fancy celebratory dinners or when people came to visit. So no, it was like growing up literally anywhere else.

6. "Can you plan my trip there for me?"

I have no problem giving some good food or hotel suggestions to people planning on making a trip to Vegas, but I am not a tour guide nor was I old enough to do half the things you want to do when I was growing up. So, I'm probably not going to be of much help. Sorry.

No matter how annoying it can be to be asked a million questions every time I say my hometown, I wouldn't trade it for anything. Thank you Las Vegas for always making me the person everyone wants to talk to, oh and go Golden Knights!!

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I Visited The "Shameless" Houses And Here's Why You Shouldn't

Glamorizing a less-than-ideal way to live.
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After five hours of driving, hearing the GPS say, "Turn right onto South Homan Avenue" was a blessing.

My eyes peeled to the side of the road, viciously looking for what I have been driving so long for, when finally, I see it: the house from "Shameless."

"Shameless" is a hit TV show produced by Showtime. It takes place in modern-day Southside, Chicago. The plot, while straying at times, largely revolves around the Gallagher family and their continual struggle with (extreme) poverty. While a majority of the show is filmed offsite in a studio in Los Angeles, many outside scenes are filmed in Southside and the houses of the Gallagher's and side-characters are very much based on real houses.

We walked down the street, stopped in front of the two houses, took pictures and admired seeing the house in real life. It was a surreal experience and I felt out of place like I didn't belong there. As we prepared to leave (and see other spots from the show), a man came strolling down on his bicycle and asked how we were doing.

"Great! How are you?"

It fell silent as the man stopped in front of the Gallagher house, opened the gate, parked his bike and entered his home. We left a donation on his front porch, got back to the car and took off.

As we took the drive to downtown Chicago, something didn't sit right with me. While it was exciting to have this experience, I began to feel a sense of guilt or wrongdoing. After discussing it with my friends, I came to a sudden realization: No one should visit the "Gallagher" house.

The plot largely revolves the Gallagher family and their continual struggle with (extreme) poverty. It represents what Southside is like for so many residents. While TV shows always dramatize reality, I realized coming to this house was an exploitation of their conditions. It's entertaining to see Frank's shenanigans on TV, the emotional roller coasters characters endure and the outlandish things they have to do to survive. I didn't come here to help better their conditions, immerse myself in what their reality is or even for the donation I left: I came here for my entertainment.

Southside Chicago is notoriously dangerous. The thefts, murders and other crimes committed on the show are not a far-fetched fantasy for many of the residents, it's a brutal reality. It's a scary way to live. Besides the Milkovich home, all the houses typically seen by tourists are occupied by homeowners. It's not a corporation or a small museum, it's their actual property. I don't know how many visitors these homes get per day, week, month or year. Still, these homeowners have to see frequent visitors at any hour of the day, interfering with their lives. In my view, coming to their homes and taking pictures of them is a silent way of glamorizing the cycle of poverty. It's a silent way of saying we find joy in their almost unlivable conditions.

The conceit of the show is not the issue. TV shows have a way of romanticizing very negative things all the time. The issue at hand is that several visitors are privileged enough to live in a higher quality of life.

I myself experienced the desire and excitement to see the houses. I came for the experience but left with a lesson. I understand that tourism will continue to the homes of these individuals and I am aware that my grievances may not be shared with everyone, however, I think it's important to take a step back and think about if this were your life. Would you want hundreds, potentially thousands, of people coming to your house? Would you want people to find entertainment in your lifestyle, good and bad?

I understand the experience, excitement, and fun the trip can be. While I recommend skipping the houses altogether and just head downtown, it's most important to remember to be respectful to those very individuals whose lives have been affected so deeply by "Shameless."

Cover Image Credit: itsfilmedthere.com

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College Party 'Ratios' Are Sexist Discrimination Against Men, Change My Mind

For every guy who wants to go to a party, he needs four or five girls to accompany him.

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I'm sure at least every college student has at least been to a party once — or they've tried to. I'm a first-year female, and I've been to a few parties. I don't necessarily like them, but free drinks and good music can rope anyone in. There's also the fact that females can get into these parties with NO hassle. You have a group of 10 girls? No problem. Three girls? Step right up. Even if you're all alone, you can get in anywhere as long as you're a female.

But if you're a male? Good luck, you're most likely not going to get in.

Before I came to college, I didn't understand what "ratios" were. I mean, of course, I know what an actual ratio is in mathematical terms, but a party ratio is a little different.

It's also very very sexist.

Most parties put out a ratio when the addresses come out. They'll usually be something like 1:4 or 1:5. This actually means, that for every guy who wants to go to a party, he needs four or five girls to accompany him. Simply preparing for that and gathering girls itself is hard. Especially because if you're a male and you want your male best friend to come with you, both of you need about eight or 10 girls COMBINED. Isn't that a little too much?

Last week, my roommate dragged me out of bed to go to a party because I'd been working all week. I agreed only because the weather was somewhat okay. We went with a couple from our residence hall, one other female, and two other guys. So a total of four girls, and three guys. Obviously not good for ratios at all. When we got to the party, we found out that not only was the ratio 1:5, but a dude had to pay $5 for EVERY MISSING GIRL. So we all split up to get in, and it was me and one of the guys as a "group." They let me in, but the guy with me had to pay $15 dollars out of pocket.

And the party was a**!

What really inspired me to write this article, was when he said, "I feel really bad about paying $15 for this. I work at a grocery store and I only make money doing that, so this is really painful."

To be honest, I was pretty mad. I would never put down that much money for a stupid party. But what do you do if you're a guy and don't have a ratio? You pay.

We're always talking about the feminist movement and how men have more than females, but is this really any better?

Parties just want females for clout. Males are overshadowed. Why should only guys have to pay to get in? When asked, the answer comes down to covering the costs assumed for throwing the party. The fraternities need to cover for their drinks and any decorations, so they use this money to do so. But not every male who pays to get in drinks. So why not just let people in and then make them pay for each drink they have? It's not sexist and it makes everyone responsible for THEIR actions.

A guy shouldn't have to pay $15 so a bunch of girls can drink free alcohol. Parties should make everyone pay to get in. Anywhere from $2-$5 per person is more than enough to cover costs. Ostracizing males from females in this matter isn't trying to achieve a more equal future for anyone. It's backward, sexist, extremely segregating, and it needs to stop.

Change my mind.

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