The Plague Of Females Is Our Own Self Sabotage

The Plague Of Females Is Our Own Self Sabotage

Why are girls so mean to girls, when they know how hard it is to be a girl?

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The abundant displays of disrespect and coarseness aimed towards women are no secret.

The most troubling aspect of the above harsh reality is that (in my observation based opinion), far too often these acts of antagonism and attempts to tear women down are originated from other women.

Feminism in itself is, unfortunately, considered somewhat taboo. The confines of the concept and the depth of its realm are grey areas that different individuals can interpret in different ways. In actuality, and what I believe feminism means to most, is the fight for women's equality on the basis of sex.

Because of our societal structure and the inherently patriarchal nature of our nation, women are often objectified, belittled, and simply treated poorly. As females, we can fight this battle to the end of time, but if we fail to treat each other with basic respect and forget to talk to each other with kind words, we will be cemented in a standstill. "A house divided against itself cannot stand," President Lincoln once said.

Although comparing the status of our previously separated nation to the current feminist issue may be deemed radical, it is the principle that matters. Being a girl is undeniably a difficult thing in itself. If you're too skinny, too fat, too tall, too short, too talkative, too shy, too loud, too quiet, or too much or too little of anything, you lose. Humans aren't created on an adjustable scale where you can determine how much of what each individual gets. We are born the way we are, and if you're a woman, that already sets you back.

So, the recurring question is; why do girls treat other girls so awfully, knowing how hard it is to be a girl?

I do not know the answer. I do not think anyone does. But the frequency of female despair and destruction caused by other women is, frankly and sadly, astounding. Every day, you hear about a new story about someone hooking up with someone else's boyfriend, or a girl negatively commenting on another girls body, hair, appearance. You see women silently rooting for other's failure. And you see women tearing other's down for their own pleasure.

This is not to say that all women are evil, praying for other girls to fail or get hurt. This is far from the truth. But the overarching approach and rhetoric women have adopted when discussing other females is detrimental to the mission of women's equality as a whole, and the advancement of girl's power.

In a world constructed against us, us women must stick together, build each other up, and remain united.

Adopt a more positive tone when discussing other females, as we are all just doing the best we can. Never comment on another's body, as it feeds into the objectification and unrealistic expectations. And lastly, just show simple respect for other women (and everybody)!

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10 Abnormally Normal Things About College

Some stuff just doesn't fly in the real world.
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College is a weird, weird place. For whatever reason, the young adults who are supposed to be cultivating their minds with all of the worldly knowledge available to them, seem to get away with quite a bit using the justification "it's college." Even the best students live abnormally while on the alien planet that is a university. So, while to us college students it may just seem like another day, here are ten things that are only normal in college.

1. Straight up theft.

In the future, if I walk into my forty-something-year-old neighbor's home and see a collection of stolen signs, stuff from the local restaurant, and property from the construction site down the road, I would definitely be concerned about the character of my neighbor. However, in college, people proudly display campus signs, traffic cones, or dining hall napkin dispensers that they have impressively commandeered - it's a cheap decoration and a great conversation starter.

2. All-nighters.

Maybe with the exception of parents of little babies, very few people willingly stay up for close to 24 hours on end. In the real world, if a friend came to you and said that they literally did not sleep the previous night, it's completely logical to be worried. On the other hand, when a friend in college says that he was up all night you laugh a little, give him an understanding pat on the back, and walk with him to the coffee line.

3. Atrocious eating habits.

Sometimes you don't have time to eat. Sometimes you order pizza at 2 in the morning. Sometimes you eat three dinners. Sometimes you diet. All I can say, is thank goodness that our metabolisms are decently high at this age.

4. Breaking and entering.

In high school, you hopefully knew everyone who entered your home. After college, hopefully, that's still the case. However, when you live in the middle of thousands of bored college students, people knock at your door, walk into parties, cut through your yard, and stop by without invitation or hesitation. It keeps life fun, but still not normal.

5. Calling mom when stuff goes down.

I really doubt a time will ever come that I don't need to call my mom for guidance on how to do something. But, hopefully the frequency of those calls with go down a little bit post-graduation. Maybe after four years of doing it on my own, I'll know how to fill out government forms, cook real dinners, and get stains out. But for now, I'm going to keep calling while I still can without seeming totally pathetic.

6. Being intoxicated at weird times.

Drunk at noon on a Friday is the quintessence of an alcoholic at any time - unless it's college. Not that this is necessarily a good thing, and it certainly doesn't apply to everyone, but there aren't many other places where people would instantly assume someone is intoxicated if they're acting even a little weird. I've even seen people drink in the library....

7. The messed up dating scene.



There are people who meet the love of their life at college and live happily ever after. They are people who meet the supposed love of their life at college and never talk to them again after Sunday. There are people who use Tinder. Hormones are high, freedom is bountiful, and football players are cute - what else needs to be said?

8. A warped sense of time.

The career I'm pursuing will require me to be at work by 7 am, five days a week. I am fully aware of this. Now, will I enroll in an 8 am next semester? Absolutely not - I'm not a demon. In college, nights often start at 10 p.m., dinners are eaten at 4, and mornings can begin anywhere from 8 to 2. We don't get that whole 9-5 idea.

9. Costumes... for no apparent reason.

High schoolers have a dress code. Adults have dignity. College students have fun. Here, people will wear a corn costume to get on ESPN, a fanny pack to get into a fraternity, or a tutu to match a theme party. Is it actually a weird thing, though? No one even blinks an eye.

10. Insanely close friends.

Name another point in your life when you live with your friends, study with your friends, drive with your friends, eat with your friends, go out with your friends, and even grocery shop with your friends. I'll wait. At college, it's easy for friends to seem like family because you're with them constantly. Love it or hate it, it's weird about college.

So, enjoy this weirdness while you can - it won't last forever!


ALSO SEE:

Uncensored Roommate Confessions!

Cover Image Credit: Matthew Kupfer

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Trying To Understand Odyssey: Why Do You Read This And Why Do I Write It?

A reflection on my motives, your motives and this endearing platform.

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Have you ever thought about how random Odyssey is? I mean, scroll through its main page, or the Odyssey at Emory page. It's a bunch of random college students writing about a bunch of random topics. And apparently, a bunch of random readers. So who are you, and why do you read my articles? And why do I even bother to write them in the first place?

I have been having a really busy semester, and handing in many articles for Odyssey long after they are due. Usually, I end up writing late at night (as I am currently doing) when I really should be sleeping or doing schoolwork. So why do I keep writing? Why don't I give up on this extracurricular activity that doesn't really add that much to my CV, due to me wanting to pursue a career in psychology?

I think it goes back to why I was attracted to Odyssey in the first place – its paradoxical freedom. The two things I most appreciate about the Odyssey is the fact that it makes me write 500 words every two weeks (although I love writing I have no self-discipline), and that I get to choose what I write about. The Odyssey keeps my ideas alive by making me think about things that aren't school in the way that I find to be most productive – through writing.

That covers me, but what about you, reader? I honestly thought no one read Odyssey, but I have access to how many page views my articles have and they are higher than I expected. I think I have two or three friends who read some of my articles, and my mum logs in once in a while, but that doesn't account for all the readers. I imagine some of you are fellow Odyssey writers who, like me, once you hand in a piece you scroll down and see what else is on this platform. And what a random journey it is, to scroll through the Odyssey. You encounter everything, from opinions on current events to pieces that are way too personal to be on the internet (but I admire the brave souls who publish them anyway). Personally, as a student of psychology I am interested in the way people think, so I find it productive to waste my time following the trains of thought of random college students.

But what about you? What do you get from looking at some pieces of my mind? Am I a name you recognize in class and the gossiper in you decided to look at what I think about gun control, or why I keep a diary? Did my article's title grab your attention? Or are you just really bored?

And why are you in Odyssey's website in the first place?

I might question why we are doing what we are doing – me writing and you reading – but I don't question Odyssey as a platform. What an endearing thing, to provide students with the space to write about things that don't really matter but we want to write about anyway. To create a space where I can open up without knowing to whom I am really opening up to, which somehow makes opening up so much easier. So please, reader, let's not stop.

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