These Are Unarguably The Greatest Quarterbacks Of All Time

These Are Unarguably The Greatest Quarterbacks Of All Time

Who's the GOAT?
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Many people have been called the greatest of all time, especially in sports, so debates always occur over who is really the greatest of all-time. Well, I am going to start the journey to figure out who is the greatest NFL player of all-time by going through every position (I may eventually go on the epic journey of figuring out the greatest athlete, but I'm not trying to bite off more than I can chew).

So, let's start with the most well-known position in football, the quarterback (QB).

I plan to keep the metrics simple for the QBs. I am going to look at three key areas of performance: Stats/Records, Awards, and Championships. So without any further ado, let's get into the top 10:

10. John Elway

Stats/Records:162 Wins (4th all-time), Sacked 516 times (2nd), 56.9% Completion (T-91st), 226 Passes Intercepted (15th), 51,475 Passing Yards (6th), 35 Comeback Wins (5th), and 300 Passing TDs (11th)

Awards: 9× Pro Bowl (1986, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1996–1998), First-team All-Pro (1987), 2× Second-team All-Pro (1993, 1996), NFL Most Valuable Player (1987), 2× AFC Offensive Player of the Year (1987, 1993), NFL 1990s All-Decade Team, NFL Hall of Fame, and Denver Broncos Ring of Fame

Championships: Five AFC Championships, Two Super Bowls (XXXII and XXXIII), and One Super Bowl MVP (XXXIII)

Elway was a great quarterback, to be in the Hall of Fame it is kinda required, but he did not do everything great. Elway struggled with accuracy, which shows in his completion percentage and passes intercepted, and is the main reason why it took him so long to win a Super Bowl. That said, Elway is still one of the best statistical quarterbacks all time, and played a huge roll in defining the modern QB that can run as well as pass.

9. Otto Graham

Stats/Records:114 Total Wins (13th all-time(61 NFL Wins(77th)), 55.8% Completion (T-112th), 135 Passes Intercepted (74th), 23,584 Passing Yards (84th), 10 Comeback Wins (T-112), and 174 Passing TDs (T-59th)
NFL Record for career average yards gained per pass attempt, with 9.0 and the record for the highest career winning percentage 81.4%

Awards: 5× Pro Bowl (1950–1954), 4× First-team All-Pro (1951, 1953–1955), Second-team All-Pro (1952), 3× NFL Most Valuable Player (1951, 1953, 1955), 3× First-team All-AAFC (1947–1949), 2× AAFC Most Valuable Player (1947, 1948), NFL Hall of Fame, NFL 1950s All-Decade Team, and NFL 75th Anniversary Team

Championships: Three NFL championships (1950, 1954, 1955) and Four AAFC Championships (1946-1949)

Otto Graham earns a place on this list for a few reasons, but the biggest one is that he won games. Graham is the winningest quarterback in history, so, despite the rest of his numbers not holding up, he warrants a place on the list. That said, his success in a less-talented era, combined with the number being nowhere near the modern stars, leaves him near the bottom though.

8. Aaron Rodgers

Stats/Records:103 Wins (18th all-time), Sacked 360 times (T-24th) 65.2% Completion (7th), 75 Passes Intercepted (164th), 38,212 Passing Yards (20th), 12 Comeback Wins (T-90), and 310 Passing TDs (10th) NFL Record career 104.0 passer rating, season 122.5 passer rating (2011), and career 4.13:1 touchdown-to-interception ratio

Awards: 2× NFL Most Valuable Player (2011, 2014), 6× Pro Bowl (2009, 2011, 2012, 2014–2016), 2× First-team All-Pro (2011, 2014), Second-team All-Pro (2012), Associated Press Athlete of the Year (2011), and Bert Bell Award (2011)

Championships: One NFC Championship, One Super Bowl (XLV), and One Super Bowl MVP (XLV)

Aaron Rodgers *in Stephen A. Smith's voice* is a bbbaaaaad maaaan. In all seriousness, Rodgers has the potential to top this list if he places the rest of his career at a top level, but with injuries and the possibility of some people playing longer than he will, Rodgers might not. The facts are this though, Rodgers is great, but #7 and the rest of the list have better numbers that best Rodgers, for now.

7. Drew Brees

Stats/Records:146 Wins (T-6th all-time), Sacked 373 times (T-9th) 66.9% Completion (1st), 225 Passes Intercepted (16th), 69,409 Passing Yards (3rd), 30 Comeback Wins (T-8th), and 482 Passing TDs (T-3rd) NFL Record 66.8 career completion percentage, 7 touchdown passes in a game (tied), and 54 consecutive games with a touchdown pass

Awards: 10× Pro Bowl (2004, 2006, 2008–2014, 2016), First-team All-Pro (2006), 3× Second-team All-Pro (2008, 2009, 2011), 2× NFL Offensive Player of the Year (2008, 2011), Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (2010), Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year (2010), Bert Bell Award (2009), Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year (2006), NFL Comeback Player of the Year (2004)

Championships: One NFC Championship, One Super Bowl (XLIV), and One Super Bowl MVP (XLIV)

Brees has had an amazing career but is underrated in a sense. Some people would say he does not even belong on this list, let alone ahead of Rodgers, but his resume stacks up well against this whole list, and is a bit better than Rodgers. The thing that puts Brees over Rodgers is the fact that he has all the listed NFL records, but he has plenty that are also "Fastest or Youngest to do X," which Rodgers might take from him, but until Rodgers does it, Brees holds the #7 spot.

6. Dan Marino


Stats/Records:155 Wins (5th all-time), Sacked 270 times (58th) 59.4% Completion (T-50th), 252 Passes Intercepted (8th), 61,361 Passing Yards (5th), 36 Comeback Wins (T-3rd), and 420 Passing TDs (5th)

Awards: 9× Pro Bowl (1983–1987, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995),3× First-team All-Pro (1984–1986), 4× Second-team All-Pro (1983, 1992, 1994, 1995), NFL Most Valuable Player (1984), NFL Offensive Player of the Year (1984), Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year (1998), NFL Rookie of the Year (1983), NFL Comeback Player of the Year (1994), NFL Hall of Fame, Miami Dolphins No. 13 retired, and Miami Dolphin Honor Roll

Championships: One AFC Championship

Marino is one of the greatest of all time... to never win a super bowl. All jokes aside, Marino was an amazing player, and the stats warrant the fifth spot on this list, not because of how many categories he finishes 5th in, but because he was that good. The fact that Marino never won a ring, combined with the fact that the majority of his records have been broken, leaves "Mr. Monday Night" sitting behind the guys he delivered every Sunday and Monday.

5. Brett Favre

Stats/Records:199 Wins (3rd all-time), Sacked 525 times (1st) 62.0% Completion (25th), 336 Passes Intercepted (1st), 71,838 Passing Yards (2nd), 30 Comeback Wins (T-8th), and 508 Passing TDs (2nd) NFL Record Most pass completions (6,300), Most pass attempts (10,169), Most pass interceptions (336), Most fumbles (166), and Most starts (298)

Awards: 11× Pro Bowl (1992, 1993, 1995–1997, 2001–2003, 2007–2009), 3× First-team All-Pro (1995–1997), 3× Second-team All-Pro (2001, 2002, 2007), 3× NFL Most Valuable Player (1995–1997), Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (2007), NFL Offensive Player of the Year (1995), Green Bay Packers No. 4 retired, Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame, and NFL 1990s All-Decade Team

Championships: Five NFC Championships and One Super Bowl (XXXI)

Brett Favre retired from the game of pro football with the majority of records that a QB can hold, but not all of those records are good. Favre, for all of his greatness, was a gunslinger and a turnover machine, which at times was more detrimental to his teams than beneficial to them. Despite those faults, Brett Favre was the "Iron Man" with 298 starts, 297 of which were consecutive starts, also a record, one of which was a game the same day his father died, so I have nothing but respect for him and what he has done for football.

4. Johnny Unitas

Stats/Records:124 Wins (10th all-time), 54.6% Completion (T-129th), 253 Passes Intercepted (7th), 40,239 Passing Yards (19th), 36 Comeback Wins (T-3rd), and 290 Passing TDs (14th) NFL Record Three Bert Bell Awards (Tied with Peyton Manning and Randall Cunningham)

Awards: 10× Pro Bowl (1957–1964, 1966, 1967), 5× First-team All-Pro (1958, 1959, 1964, 1965, 1967), 2× Second-team All-Pro (1957, 1963), 3× AP NFL Most Valuable Player (1959, 1964, 1967), 3× Bert Bell Award (1959, 1964, 1967), NFL Man of the Year (1970), NFL Hall of Fame, NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, NFL 1960s All-Decade Team, and Indianapolis Colts No. 19 retired

Championships: Three NFL Championships (1958, 1959, and 1968) and One Super Bowl (V)

Johnny Unitas was the greatest quarterback of all time when he retired, and he had just about every record to prove it. As time has gone past, other quarterbacks have followed and surpassed what he has accomplished, but he changed the game of football so much that his contribution cannot be ignored. Unitas and his team were one half of the "greatest game ever played" back in 1958, which is cited by many as the game that made football mainstream, but that still isn't enough to beat out those ahead of him, since they can match his merits.

3. Peyton Manning

Stats/Records:200 Wins (2nd all-time), Sacked 303 times (47th) 65.3% Completion (T-5th), 251 Passes Intercepted (9th), 71,940 Passing Yards (1st), 45 Comeback Wins (1st), and 539 Passing TDs (1st) NFL Record 71,940 passing yards, career, 5,477 passing yards, season, 539 passing touchdowns, career, 55 passing touchdowns, season, 7 touchdown passes in a game (tied), and many more

Awards: 14× Pro Bowl (1999, 2000, 2002–2010, 2012–2014), 7× First-team All-Pro (2003–2005, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2013), 3× Second-team All-Pro (1999, 2000, 2006), 5× NFL MVP (2003, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2013), 3× Bert Bell Award (2003, 2004, 2013), 2× NFL Offensive Player of the Year (2004, 2013), Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (2013), NFL Comeback Player of the Year (2012), NFL 2000s All-Decade Team, and Indianapolis Colts No. 18 retired

Championships: Four AFC Championships, Two Super Bowls (XLI and 50), and One Super Bowl MVP (XLI)

Peyton Manning is one of three players to win three Bert Bell awards, along with Unitas and Cunningham, and the only five-time MVP. Manning has a ridiculous amount of records, but he is only number three on this list. This is because all of Manning's records can be broken by people in this list, and he did not have the postseason success that a few others have had.

2. Joe Montana

Stats/Records:133 Wins (8th all-time), Sacked 313 times (T-31st) 63.2% Completion (15th), 139 Passes Intercepted (68th), 40,551 Passing Yards (18th), 31 Comeback Wins (T-6th), and 273 Passing TDs (16th) NFL Postseason Records for pass attempts (122) without throwing an interception and most games with a passer rating over 100.0 (12)

Awards: 8× Pro Bowl (1981, 1983–1985, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1993), 3× First-team All-Pro (1987, 1989, 1990), 2× Second-team All-Pro (1981, 1984), 2× NFL Most Valuable Player (1989, 1990), NFL Offensive Player of the Year (1989), Bert Bell Award (1989), Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (1990), 2× AP Athlete of the Year (1989, 1990), NFL Comeback Player of the Year (1986), NFL Hall of Fame, NFL 1980s All-Decade Team, NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, and San Francisco 49ers No. 16 retired

Championships: Four NFC Championships, Four Super Bowls (XVI, XIX, XXIII and XXIV), and Three Super Bowl MVP (XVI, XIX, and XXIV)

Joe Montana may not have had the total stats to go head-to-head with Peyton Manning, but when the playoffs came around, Montana was in a league of his own. Montana seemed to always find a way to deliver in the biggest moments, and it has led to him being considered among the greatest of all-time. His regular season success keeps him from getting the top spot, however, because football is not just a regular season or a postseason, but both.

Before we get to the #1 spot, here are a few honorable mentions:

Russel Wilson - This year has shown just how good Wilson can be, but until he does it consistently and gets the records some of the people who made the list have, he sits as an honorable mention.

Roger Staubach - As a Cowboy's fan, I really wanted to justify putting Staubach on the list, but the overall success is not there.

Randall Cunningham - The best true dual-threat quarterback of all-time, Cunningham misses the list because he did not put up the numbers as pure QB to earn a spot, but in terms of pure athletic ability, he could be in the top 5.

Now for the number one spot...

1. Baker Mayfield

Stats/Records: One TRAITOR Shirt, One flag planting, One "Who's Your Daddy," One "Stick to Basketball," Two sets of fake tears. Three FUs to KU, and One crotch-grab.

Awards: Future Heisman, the Cockiest man alive, and the most polarizing athlete of all-time

Championships: All of them including the People's Championship

Baker Mayfield is a straight baller. The kid knows how to perform on the grandest stage, and his earned his G.O.A.T. status. Don't disrespect the greatness of Baker Mayfield by assuming anyone else could top this list, and I am laughing while writing this some I am just going to stop.

In all seriousness:

1. Tom Brady

Stats/Records: 218 Wins (1st all-time), Sacked 444 times (9th) 64.0% Completion (T-12th), 156 Passes Intercepted (57th), 65,214 Passing Yards (4th), 40 Comeback Wins (2nd), and 482 Passing TDs (T-3rd) NFL Record Best touchdown to interception ratio in a season (28:2), Most wins on the road by a quarterback (85), NFL Playoff Record Most games started by a quarterback (34), Most games won by a starting quarterback (25), Most touchdown passes (63), Most passing yards (9,094), Most passes completed (831), Most passes attempted (1,325), and the Super Bowl version of the previous four records.

Awards: 12× Pro Bowl (2001, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2009–2016), 2× First-team All-Pro (2007, 2010), 2× Second-team All-Pro (2005, 2016), 2× NFL Most Valuable Player (2007, 2010), 2× NFL Offensive Player of the Year (2007, 2010), NFL Comeback Player of the Year (2009), Bert Bell Award (2007), Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year (2007), Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (2005), and NFL 2000s All-Decade Team

Championships: Seven AFC Championships, Five Super Bowls (XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXXIX, XLIX, and LI), and Four Super Bowl MVPs (XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXIX, and LI)

Of course it was going to be Tom Brady at the top of this list. Peyton Manning might be the best regular season quarterback of all-time, Joe Montana might be the best postseason quarterback of all-time, but Brady has numbers to compete with both of them in their respective domains. Tom Brady, just like Madden 18 said, is the G.O.A.T.


All data was pulled from profootballreference.com, NFL.com, and Profootballhof.com

Cover Image Credit: Twitter

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To The Coach Who Took Away My Confidence

You had me playing in fear.
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"The road to athletic greatness is not marked by perfection, but the ability to constantly overcome adversity and failure."

As a coach, you have a wide variety of players. You have your slow players, your fast players. You have the ones that are good at defense. You have the ones that are good at offense. You have the ones who would choose to drive and dish and you have the ones that would rather shoot the three. You have the people who set up the plays and you have the people who finish them. You are in charge of getting these types of players to work together and get the job done.

Sure, a coach can put together a pretty set of plays. A coach can scream their head off in a game and try and get their players motivated. A coach can make you run for punishment, or they can make you run to get more in shape. The most important role of a coach, however, is to make the players on their team better. To hopefully help them to reach their fullest potential. Players do make mistakes, but it is from those mistakes that you learn and grow.

To the coach the destroyed my confidence,

You wanted to win, and there was nothing wrong with that. I saw it in your eyes if I made a mistake, you were not too happy, which is normal for a coach. Turnovers happen. Players miss shots. Sometimes the girl you are defending gets past you. Sometimes your serve is not in bounds. Sometimes someone beats you in a race. Sometimes things happen. Players make mistakes. It is when you have players scared to move that more mistakes happen.

I came on to your team very confident in the way that I played the game. Confident, but not cocky. I knew my role on the team and I knew that there were things that I could improve on, but overall, I was an asset that could've been made into an extremely great player.

You paid attention to the weaknesses that I had as a player, and you let me know about them every time I stepped onto the court. You wanted to turn me into a player I was not. I am fast, so let me fly. You didn't want that. You wanted me to be slow. I knew my role wasn't to drain threes. My role on the team was to get steals. My role was to draw the defense and pass. You got mad when I drove instead of shot. You wanted me to walk instead of run. You wanted me to become a player that I simply wasn't. You took away my strengths and got mad at me when I wasn't always successful with my weaknesses.

You did a lot more than just take away my strengths and force me to focus on my weaknesses. You took away my love for the game. You took away the freedom of just playing and being confident. I went from being a player that would take risks. I went from being a player that was not afraid to fail. Suddenly, I turned into a player that questioned every single move that I made. I questioned everything that I did. Every practice and game was a battle between my heart and my head. My heart would tell me to go to for it. My heart before every game would tell me to just not listen and be the player that I used to be. Something in my head stopped me every time. I started wondering, "What if I mess up?" and that's when my confidence completely disappeared.

Because of you, I was afraid to fail.

You took away my freedom of playing a game that I once loved. You took away the relaxation of going out and playing hard. Instead, I played in fear. You took away me looking forward to go to my games. I was now scared of messing up. I was sad because I knew that I was not playing to my fullest potential. I felt as if I was going backward and instead of trying to help me, you seemed to just drag me down. I'd walk up to shoot, thinking in my head, "What happens if I miss?" I would have an open lane and know that you'd yell at me if I took it, so I just wouldn't do it.

SEE ALSO: The Coach That Killed My Passion

The fight to get my confidence back was a tough one. It was something I wish I never would've had to do. Instead of becoming the best player that I could've been, I now had to fight to become the player that I used to be. You took away my freedom of playing a game that I loved. You took away my good memories in a basketball uniform, which is something I can never get back. You can be the greatest athlete in the world, but without confidence, you won't go very far.

Cover Image Credit: Christina Silies

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Andy Ruiz Jr. May Not Look Like The Typical Boxer, But It Doesn't Make His Victory Any Less Deserved

Andy Ruiz Jr. just proved that dreams can come true.

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On June 1, boxing fans witnessed something special as Andy 'Destroyer' Ruiz Jr. defeated Anthony Joshua via TKO after going seven rounds in the ring at Madison Square Garden in New York City to become the first ever Mexican-American heavyweight champion of the world. Ruiz Jr. (33-1) was a heavy underdog (+1100) heading into the match-up with Joshua (22-1) but ultimately flipped the script to hand the British fighter his first professional loss ever. Surely the fight will go down as one of the greatest moments in sports history.

Some members of the media and fans have been quick to label the fight as a 'fluke' and 'rigged' which in the end is no surprise to me. That always happens in the sports world. Many did not believe we would get this result yet failed to remember the one rule of sports -- expect the unexpected. Over the past week, I've been coming to the defense of Ruiz Jr. in the wake of others choosing to call him a joke.

I was shocked and surprised to hear two of my favorite sports analysts, Stephen A. Smith and Shannon Sharpe, make fun of Ruiz Jr. and frame him as just a guy that looked like 'Butterbean.' When I viewed their tweets on social media it honestly made me upset. Sure, Ruiz Jr. may not have fit the mold of what a professional boxer should look like, but they simply should not have just judged a book by its cover.

Personally, I thought it was disrespectful for Smith and Sharpe to throw shade at Ruiz Jr. in the way they did. I felt like they should have done a better job of acknowledging the winner considering the result of the match. Yet choosing to bash someone because of their physical composition appeared like a low blow. The very foundation of sports allows people of all shapes, sizes, genders, races, and backgrounds to compete -- that's why most people follow them in the first place.

Smith was open behind his reasoning for his tweets in which I'd like to shed some light on. Smith was upset about how boxing time after time contains elements of corruption with fans having to wait years until promoters schedule big fights. He along with other followers of the sport were looking forward to the highly anticipated yet potential future match-up between Joshua and fellow heavyweight Deontay Wilder. Smith believes that by Ruiz Jr. beating Joshua it essentially diminished the chances of that fight ever happening with the same amount of buildup, but that still doesn't provide any excuse for mocking the new heavyweight champ.

Ruiz Jr. was there for a reason and ultimately seized the opportunity that was right in front of him -- that's not his fault for getting the job done. Just because someone doesn't look like the part doesn't mean they don't possess the same qualities and characteristics as their counterparts. The following pair of videos display the amount of talent Ruiz Jr. does have in the ring. Even fellow boxer Canelo Alvarez and former UFC lightweight/featherweight champion Conor McGregor acknowledge that and have come out to say something on their behalf.

Unfortunately, I don't expect much to change because most will stand their ground and continue to behave the same way. All I'm saying is I did not enjoy some of the top figures within sports media stereotyping Ruiz Jr. based on his looks. I would think that we would be better than that and recognize that anyone can accomplish something great in this world. It all just starts with a simple dream.

I understand and respect other people's takes on this subject, maybe I'm looking into things deeper than what they are, but it struck a chord with me and I felt the need to say something about it.

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