The Consistency of "A Christmas Carol"

The Consistency of "A Christmas Carol"

The story that hasn't gone out of style
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The story of the neighborhood bah humbug who doesn’t appreciate his surroundings has become a Christmas tradition, whether through reenactments, film, or even just reading the classic. But a story set against the backdrop of Victorian England? It’s 2016 now, we have Donald Trump, social media, new variations of iPhones being released every minute, and yet no one has stopped talking about this timeless tale.

Why has this story persevered against the influences of the ages? I’d like to think that it’s because of the increasing complexity of our society, and how the holidays have become so commercialized. We still tell this story because it takes us back to a time much simpler than this, and depicts the journey towards appreciation of the people around you. It simply reminds us of what christmastime is all about. Sharing food with people less fortunate, helping families in need of medical care, being kind and considerate of other hardworking individuals, genuinely caring about the people around you and opening your hearts, not so much the extravagance of the holiday itself.

Personally, I will never forget the first time that I saw a theater production of A Christmas Carol. As a young girl, I was completely amazed by the beauty of the setting, and how someone filled with so much darkness and uncertainty could become so generous, thoughtful, and truly happy.

Charles Dickens’s novella was published in 1843, and received critical acclaim across London and beyond. While some have reviewed it as an obvious tale of religious conversion, but outside of religion, it’s simply a story about becoming a better and more aware person. While the setting contributes to the charm of the story, at its core, we face the same issue today.

Ebenezer Scrooge is visited by three ghosts: The ghost of Christmas past, Christmas present, and Christmas future. One of Scrooge’s issues is that he can’t come to terms with his troubled past. Through Dickens’s master storytelling, he teaches the reader that one’s past does not define them, and you can still make of yourself what you want, as depicted by the Ghost of Christmas present. The impact of Scrooge’s careless actions is evident in his bleak future, which the Ghost of Christmas future shows him as a warning for him to change the judgemental, greedy, and unhappy way he is living his life.

In a world with over-the-top amounts of technology and often overwhelming amounts of information, the same things are true for many of us. Because of social media, we compare ourselves to others and have a hard time with our past. Yet if we’re lucky, something will give us a wake up call and we will appreciate the encouraging people around us. Hopefully, we can carry this idea into our future. A Christmas Carol illustrates the simple truth, that we all need lifting up sometimes, and it’s never a bad idea to try and improve our ways. Of course, there’s no better time to act on these ideas than Christmastime.
Cover Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

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College As Told By Junie B. Jones

A tribute to the beloved author Barbara Parks.
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The Junie B. Jones series was a big part of my childhood. They were the first chapter books I ever read. On car trips, my mother would entertain my sister and me by purchasing a new Junie B. Jones book and reading it to us. My favorite part about the books then, and still, are how funny they are. Junie B. takes things very literally, and her (mis)adventures are hilarious. A lot of children's authors tend to write for children and parents in their books to keep the attention of both parties. Barbara Park, the author of the Junie B. Jones series, did just that. This is why many things Junie B. said in Kindergarten could be applied to her experiences in college, as shown here.

When Junie B. introduces herself hundreds of times during orientation week:

“My name is Junie B. Jones. The B stands for Beatrice. Except I don't like Beatrice. I just like B and that's all." (Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, p. 1)

When she goes to her first college career fair:

"Yeah, only guess what? I never even heard of that dumb word careers before. And so I won't know what the heck we're talking about." (Junie B. Jones and her Big Fat Mouth, p. 2)

When she thinks people in class are gossiping about her:

“They whispered to each other for a real long time. Also, they kept looking at me. And they wouldn't even stop." (Junie B., First Grader Boss of Lunch, p. 66)

When someone asks her about the library:

“It's where the books are. And guess what? Books are my very favorite things in the whole world!" (Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, p. 27)

When she doesn't know what she's eating at the caf:

“I peeked inside the bread. I stared and stared for a real long time. 'Cause I didn't actually recognize the meat, that's why. Finally, I ate it anyway. It was tasty...whatever it was." (Junie B., First Grader Boss of Lunch, p. 66)

When she gets bored during class:

“I drew a sausage patty on my arm. Only that wasn't even an assignment." (Junie B. Jones Loves Handsome Warren, p. 18)

When she considers dropping out:

“Maybe someday I will just be the Boss of Cookies instead!" (Junie B., First Grader Boss of Lunch, p. 76)

When her friends invite her to the lake for Labor Day:

“GOOD NEWS! I CAN COME TO THE LAKE WITH YOU, I BELIEVE!" (Junie B. Jones Smells Something Fishy, p. 17)

When her professor never enters grades on time:

“I rolled my eyes way up to the sky." (Junie B., First Grader Boss of Lunch, p. 38)

When her friends won't stop poking her on Facebook:


“Do not poke me one more time, and I mean it." (Junie B. Jones Smells Something Fishy, p. 7)

When she finds out she got a bad test grade:

“Then my eyes got a little bit wet. I wasn't crying, though." (Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, p. 17)

When she isn't allowed to have a pet on campus but really wants one:

“FISH STICK! I NAMED HIM FISH STICK BECAUSE HE'S A FISH STICK, OF COURSE!" (Junie B. Jones Smells Something Fishy, p. 59)

When she has to walk across campus in the dark:

“There's no such thing as monsters. There's no such thing as monsters." (Junie B. Jones Has a Monster Under Her Bed, p. 12)

When her boyfriend breaks her heart:

“I am a bachelorette. A bachelorette is when your boyfriend named Ricardo dumps you at recess. Only I wasn't actually expecting that terrible trouble." (Junie B. Jones Is (almost) a Flower Girl, p. 1)

When she paints her first canvas:


"And painting is the funnest thing I love!" (Junie B. Jones and her Big Fat Mouth, p. 61)

When her sorority takes stacked pictures:

“The biggie kids stand in the back. And the shortie kids stand in the front. I am a shortie kid. Only that is nothing to be ashamed of." (Junie B. Jones Has a Monster Under Her Bed, p. 7)

When she's had enough of the caf's food:

“Want to bake a lemon pie? A lemon pie would be fun, don't you think?" (Junie B. Jones Has a Monster Under Her Bed p. 34)

When she forgets about an exam:

“Speechless is when your mouth can't speech." (Junie B. Jones Loves Handsome Warren, p. 54)

When she finds out she has enough credits to graduate:

“A DIPLOMA! A DIPLOMA! I WILL LOVE A DIPLOMA!" (Junie B. Jones is a Graduation Girl p. 6)

When she gets home from college:

"IT'S ME! IT'S JUNIE B. JONES! I'M HOME FROM MY SCHOOL!" (Junie B. Jones and some Sneaky Peaky Spying p. 20)

Cover Image Credit: OrderOfBooks

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I'm Keeping My Christmas Tree Up All Winter And There's Nothing You Can Do About It

It's the WINTER Season... ;-)

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I think that my tree would not be considered Christmas-y if the ornaments are taken off and the lights are kept on. I think to just looks wintry. I am also keeping up decorations that say "let it snow", and I am keeping up any snowman without holly berries or presents in their hands.

The tree looks wintry in my opinion. It looks pretty with the lights and brings the room together. It gives off a warm ambiance, unlike that of fluorescent lighting.

I've taken all ornaments off except for gold snowflakes and I've left the silver tinsel garland on as well as the lights. It looks wintry to me still. I will probably be taking the whole tree down by the end of this month to prepare for Valentine's Day decorating. (Yes, I pretty much decorate my apartment for every holiday—sue me).

There's nothing like coming downstairs and seeing those lights sparkling.

Or coming inside from a dreary, rainy day outside and seeing them light up the room in a calm, warm, and comforting glow.

Or having a bad day, looking up, and seeing them shine.

It sort of makes me upset when I come downstairs and see that someone has unplugged them, to be honest.

I guess they don't see it as I do.

Pretty, twinkling lights forever!

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