To The College Professor Who Shows Blatant Favoritism

To The College Professor Who Shows Blatant Favoritism

As a teacher, you should be exhibiting equality and fairness in your classroom, so why aren't you?

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Dear lover of partiality,

A month before I graduated high school, I wrote an article that praised my former teachers for doing such a good job teaching me and treating me with kindness and compassion. Those teachers treated me with the same respect they treated my classmates and showed fairness in their classroom, making it a comfortable place for open discussions. If I miss anything about high school, it's that.

In that article, I wrote, "Teachers want you to be at school because they want you to pass and go on with your life. They want to see you walk across the stage and shake the principal's hand as you leave high school behind and begin your new life, whether it's college, the military, a trade, or the workforce. They scold us when we get in trouble, help us when we're in need, pray for us when we're in tough situations, and crack down hard on us because they want to see us succeed and make something of ourselves." It's a shame that I can't say that about you.

I came into your class ready to learn and begin the college life - I knew it wasn't going to be easy or fun, but I love a challenge, and you were quite the challenge.

I tried to get your help each time I had a question, but here's what you did: you walked to the other side of the room and stayed there for thirty minutes. Keep in mind that we only have a fifty-minute class, so you spent your time talking to this one student, who has no problem being an out and proud teacher's pet, more attention than the rest of the class. I don't know how my classmates felt about you, but I didn't like that. In fact, I hated that part about your class quite a bit because it was an ongoing thing.

Don't worry, I didn't put up with it for long because after seeing that you didn't respond to my countless emails about needing help and wanting to make appointments with you in your office, you never responded; the minute I sent you a nice-nasty email calling you out on your inability to respond and how I thought you were straight up ignoring my messages, you responded fairly quickly which I found funny and ironic. All this time I was wondering what I needed to do to get a little bit of your time and all it took was a strongly worded email. I met in your office, and you rushed through my session because you had to be at your other job, which you complained about all too much for my liking. I didn't get the full time like you gave the other student and as a result, I barely passed the essay. Thanks for that.

At the tail end of the semester, I was struggling with the argumentative essay, and as usual, your favorite student talked about how she texted you to see what you were doing and that went on for twenty minutes, cutting into time that I needed for assistance, but I guess that wasn't as important as you being a night owl and not a morning person. When you finally came to me, with five minutes left in class, all of the frustration from your crap and your favoritism came out, and I almost exploded on you and the other girl. I would say sorry, but I have nothing to apologize for.

I didn't risk a student's grade to bond with another and become besties. You did that. I didn't try and waste your time and rush out of a scheduled appointment. You did that. I didn't wonder why people complain about me. You did that.

You caused all of this, and to the students who take you in the future, I wish them the best of luck because you were (and are) single-handedly the worst college professor to walk this campus for freshman. Have an excellent semester, though!

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To All Student-Athletes Beginning Their Respective Seasons, Remember Why You Play

You are going to get tired. You are going to get worn out...

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Dear athlete,

The season is by far the most exciting time of the year. Big plays, good memories, traveling new places, and winning championships... But yet another promise is that season is also exhausting.

You are going to get tired. You are going to get worn out...

But remember that this season of your life doesn't last forever. Remind yourself why you play.

You play this sport because you love the game. You love the competition, you love your teammates and the friendships that you've formed, you love the lessons you learn aside from the physical aspect.

So each day, continue to choose the game.

It's not easy. But if it was, everyone would do it. But discomfort is where progress happens.

Quit dreading practices, quit wishing for rain, quit complaining about conditioning, and quit taking for granted a busy schedule that is literally made just for you. Tens of thousands of young girls and boys would do anything to be in the position (literally) that you are in. Take advantage of being a role model to those young kids who think the world of you.

Freshmen, this is what you have wanted for so long. Take advantage of the newness, take advantage of the advice, encouragement, and constructive criticism that your older teammates give you. Soak it all in, four years goes by really quickly.

Sophomores, you now know how it works. Be confident in your abilities, yet continue to learn and grow mentally and in your position.

Juniors, prepare to take the lead. Use this season to, of course, continue to sharpen your skill, but also recognize that you're over halfway done, so mentally and physically ready yourself to take the seniors' lead next year.

Seniors, this is it. Your last year of playing the sport that you love. Be a good leader, motivate, and leave your mark on the program in which you have loved for so long. Encourage the athletes behind you to continue the traditions and standards set by the program. Lay it all on the field, leave it all on the court, and leave your program better than you found it.

Take the season one day at a time and, each day, make it your goal to get better. Get better for your team, for you pushing yourself makes everyone else work even harder. So even if you don't get a lot of playing time, make your teammates better by pushing yourself so hard that they have no other choice than to push themselves too. And when a team has every single player pushing themselves to the max, success happens.

Take advantage of this time with your teammates and coaches, for they won't be your teammates and coaches forever.

No matter what year you are and no matter what your role is this season... GROW. You are an integral part of your team and your program.

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10 Things Economics Majors Want You To Know

For the MOST part, it isn't that bad.

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I decided to become an economics major the day I started college — I know, it wasn't easy for me to decide. Well, technically the real reason why I even chose the major to begin with was that I was undecided when applying for colleges. I was, and still am, an indecisive person.

When I saw economics as one of the majors at Stony Brook, I thought it was something I was interested in. After all, it was the "study of markets and the behaviors of people in that same market." Besides psychology and philosophy (the two majors my parents didn't want me to study), I then chose econ. While it wasn't a piece of cake, it wasn't too challenging either. Here are a couple things we all want so desperately to say.

1. It's not all math, don't worry

While so many people tend to think that economics is all math and no fun, I beg to differ. As I mentioned above, it is the "study of the behavior of people in the market," so while it is equations and statistics, it is also observing how people treat prices and products.

2. It's not difficult to understand

I don't understand why parents think that if you're majoring in econ, you're pretty much signing up to fail all your courses. If they actually took the course, they would understand that it isn't the economic theory you need to understand, but how people react to changes in the stock market.

3. Majoring in econ isn't the same thing as majoring in business

When I tell people I'm an econ major, they immediately say, "Oh, business?" And then I squeeze the urge to yell in their face that I said "ECON, ECON, NOT BUSINESS." Then they continue to say they know someone that majors in business, and then ask if I know the person. The annoyances then continue. Econ is the study of markets. Business is the study of being an entrepreneur. Totally two different things. Yes, they are co-dependent, but they are not the SAME thing.

4. Please don't rely on me to do your taxes or calculate tips at a restaurant

I hate it when everyone just stares at me when the check comes. I regret telling people I'm an econ major at that point. Because I don't know how to tell them I don't learn how to do taxes or calculate tips in class, that's what finance majors do. AGAIN, not the same thing.

5. I know most of us are Asian, but don't be racist

Don't come up to me, ask me what my major is, and automatically assume that I'm an international student. It really sucks. I have to then correct them and say I'm not, and then have them walk away.

6. One of the prime motives is because we want to learn game theory

How we play games is vital to econ majors, and it does involve heavy readings of game theory books.

7. We mostly won't do econ during grad school

Because grad school is a time where we want to actually exercise our skills, it isn't a time to dawdle and major in the same things as we did in undergrad. We're actually adults by then, and we most likely will resort to marketing, sales, or advertising agencies. At least I want to work at Instagram HQ someday.

8. Our classes never have curves

Finals season is always tough on us because it just means we gotta put in three times as much work to memorize formulas, theories, and math terms. Have mercy on our souls. Most professors aren't even nice enough to bring up our grades or give us extra credit.

9. The TAs are too busy with work to help us

Even they understand econ isn't a breeze, and as TAs, they can't really explain stuff to us that they don't understand either. In fact, most of the stuff we learn in class are self-taught, usually late nights with Starbucks coffee.

10.  We actually hate business majors

Because they have it easy. And they don't need math. Everything they do is easy peasy lemon squeezy.

Not gonna lie, I love being an econ major. But some cons can be too much and it does teach me not to do econ in grad. One thing is for certain though, I love what I do and I don't regret choosing it.

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