Poetry on Odyssey: Sunday By The Bay

Poetry On Odyssey: Sunday By The Bay

All you had to do was stay.

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Sunday by the bay

White lace brushed across my face

Words I wish left unsaid

Too many not so happy tears shed

Buttons and flowers

Egos as tall as the highest towers

Curses made and promises broken

Love that was left unspoken

Bands of rose gold

Little hands I no longer get to hold

Smiles stolen that should have been mine

Ripped away with the words "that's fine"

Days passed and memory starts to blur

But knowing what I do I wouldn't go back to the way things were

You ask for money, for help, for everything from me

But when I ask for you just to see

You let me down

And my anger was sound

One day was all I wanted

But now I am forever haunted

Tainted and wasted

Manipulated and isolated

Space requested

And feelings left devastated

Maybe one day we can be friends again

Since me being in your family is just a ball and chain

You can try and delete me from your life

But I will always remember the big brother that gave me a pocket knife

You can hold people hostage, that's out of my control

But trust me when I say it's going to do more damage to her soul

I am still looking for the silver lining

I pray for the sun to start shining

I will forgive but I will not forget

And you will never scare me with your threat

Sunday by the bay

I just wish you would have wanted to stay

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8 Apps To Save The Environment

Being eco-friendly has never been easier.
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In a time where climate change becomes a more pressing issue, we fail to realize that are individual contributions have a huge effect on the bigger picture. These are some apps that you can use to challenge yourself and have fun while saving the planet!

1. Zero Carbon

Zero Carbon track your the amount and length of your daily commutes to notify you of your daily carbon footprint. This app helps people realize their individual impacts on the environment.

2. EcoCharge

This app alerts you when your phone is fully charged so you can take it off the charger. It prevents you from wasting energy on a fully charged phone.

3. GoodGuide

This app allows you to scan products around your home, and it tells you which ones are the most eco-friendly rated. It helps you realize that some items should be swapped out.

4. GreenMeter

Even if you can't reduce your amount of commutes, GreenMeter will help you drive more efficiently. You may not be accelerating properly, and you may not be braking soon enough. This app helps reduce the amount of fuel you emit while driving.

5. Farmstand

This app helps you locate local markets so you can invest in fresh, eco-friendly foods rather than the processed foods from the grocery store.

6. Light Bulb Finder

The name of this app tells you exactly what it does: find light bulbs! Having the incorrect bulbs or ones that take up unnecessary amounts of energy can easily be replaced through suggestions from this app.

7. A Real Tree

This app doesn't actually have a function, but the 99 cents price of it helps raise money to plant trees. It seems odd, but think about all the people with App store credit that they can spend towards this cause.

8. Eco-Dice

This app turns being environmentally-friendly into a fun challenge. Roll the dice on your screen to receive daily tasks including bring your own shopping bag to the store or turn off all the lights in the house before you leave.

Cover Image Credit: SciBlogs

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The Expense Of Hurricanes Should Not Be A Burden For Everyone

Imagine if the state of Florida stepped in and stopped the rebuilding and development of these areas that are prone to devastation, may cause the possibility of lowering homeowners' insurance for the rest of the citizens in Florida.

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The 2019 hurricane season starts in less than two months and I am wondering with the devastation that these storms cause on the shores of our country, when do we decide enough is enough and not allow victims to return and rebuild.

The official season for hurricanes is June 1st through November 30th. However, I want to focus primarily on the Florida coastal waters and the effects hurricanes have had on the state. Hurricane Michael depleted over and above the funds allocated for last year's storm season and it looks like Florida will start this season at a loss once again.

After Hurricane Andrew, the Florida Legislature created the Florida Hurricane Catastrophe Fund (FHCF). "The FHCF acts as a state-administered reinsurance program and is mandatory for residential property insurers writing covered policies in Florida. As of June 2018, this fund has a loss of ($1,279,762.00). The amount posted for hurricane losses is $2.5 billion. This loss was recorded well in advance of Hurricane Michael, hitting the panhandle in October 2018 with an estimated cost of damages of $25 billion.

Citizens Property Insurance Corporation was also established after Hurricane Andrew. It was created to provide coverage for home-owners that can't obtain insurance elsewhere. It is a not-for-profit insurer and is considered a last resort for homeowners. As the price of new homes increases so does the rate of homeowner insurance and many homeowners from the Keys to the Panhandle have seen their rates increase annually by 10% since 2010. This begs the question, why would anyone want to keep paying higher homeowners insurance year after year? With a higher percentage of Florida citizens in the retirement age, it seems that owning a home is more of a burden in areas that are prone to hurricanes.

When Hurricane Maria devasted Puerto Rico, it left the entire island in need of massive infrastructure rebuilding. Not only the political implications of the lack of funding for the island, but the images of destruction and personal suffering was heart-wrenching. Some are of the belief there is an economic benefit from a hurricane. After the initial blow to retail, fast food, and hospitals, there is a regrowth that puts many people back to work, if only for a temporary period and another hurricane does not come to make its way to that area for the next seven to ten years.

Yet, according to https://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/global-warming-and-hurricanes/, their models project that Atlantic hurricanes and tropical storms are substantially reduced in number, but have higher rainfall rates, particularly near the storm center, as well as potential higher intensity. This can be true for winter storms as well. Many of us have been caught in an airport or up in a northern state in the winter months and have difficulty returning to the sunshine state because of a storm that has pounded inches of snow along its path like a hurricane from the frozen tundra.

No one should be allowed to build a home in a floodplain or a flood zone. For that matter, areas that have been prone to wildfires, or fault lines. If every state looked at the areas that have been continuously destroyed by mother nature, and calculated the cost incurred to rebuild, decided to stop the bleeding and zone those areas as hazards, uninhabitable, or just government property, they will save billions of dollars for other much-needed services.

Imagine if the state of Florida stepped in and stopped the rebuilding and development of these areas that are prone to devastation, may cause the possibility of lowering homeowners' insurance for the rest of the citizens in Florida. The basic questions are, should Florida allow citizens to rebuild once their homes have been destroyed by a tropical storm? Think of it as an automobile, if the house is totaled the insurance company replaces the home. Just not in the same location.

The government has a duty to protect its citizens, and by that definition are in their rights to tell homeowners and developers the devastated area is no longer available for rebuilding. At what cost both financially and in human lives do the citizens of Florida allow the coastlines to be developed or rebuilt? If the developers and homeowners can rebuild the rest of the taxpayers and homeowners should not have to pay the increase in insurance rates or a hurricane relief tax.

The taxpayers of Florida don't want to pay a hurricane tax, they don't have a choice. Their elected officials side with the developers and the large money donor homeowners. Maybe the beach that has that $2 million home isn't meant to be there. Of course, there is a great view and the ocean or gulf coast is at your feet, as the shoreline slowly covers your property. Yet the erosion isn't going to happen in the next few years so why worry?

I can't understand why a person wants to own a home that no insurance company will insure. If these million-dollar homes on beaches meant for sunbathing, surfing, fishing, and Florida wildlife, are forever a part of Florida, maybe these homeowners need to be self-insured. Be solely responsible for the environment they own. Yet, the state of Florida has created legislation to help these people and can't figure out how to make affordable housing for the rest of the state.

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