StuDYING For Midterms: Part Two

StuDYING For Midterms: Part Two

Review? Try another road trip.
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“College update: it is midterms week, also known as the week where one completely gives up on putting any time or effort into their appearance, sleep schedule, or anything that does not require your nose to be in a book. Rooms across campus are rented out with students that are fully engaged in preparing for exams, and classrooms fall silent at the start of each midterm. Stress levels are intensified, and it becomes hard to find anyone in a pleasant mood. Thankfully, DePaul students have another five weeks to enjoy college life before actual finals hit us like a truck. Let the countdown to winter break begin.”

The passage above was written on October 17, 2017, also known as DePaul’s most recent week of midterms… also known as a time where I was somehow still managing to keep my sh*t together. I distinctly remember sitting down to write this piece after I had just returned from a trip to the University of Iowa, subtly laughing at the thought of how one week of simple examinations could truly be the one-way ticket to college students not caring about how they look, pulling all-nighters, and even picking up a physical textbook. However, with this round of midterms coming up ever so quickly, I can successfully say that I knew nothing. Now, on to business.

College update round two: midterms are upon us yet again, and I thought I understood what to expect. It is safe to say that, in comparison to last quarter, I am enrolled in significantly more challenging classes than I had been two months ago. Not only have I found myself consumed with hours of homework, but I have also found that my levels of stress have reached an all-time high.

The spirit of procrastination haunts me once again, and it seems as though my only place to escape from this demon is at the nearest Starbucks with a Venti Red Eye and a double shot of espresso (emphasis on the double), or, in this case, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where I have spent the past two weekends visiting friends as I casually “forgot” that I needed to study for midterms. As a result, I have officially become the college student that has given up on putting any time and effort into my appearance, sleep schedule, and anything that does not require my nose to be in a book for the week. Though I have yet to visit one of the various study rooms that my sorority has rented in the library, I foresee that day coming in the very near future.

The worst part? I experienced the entire “classroom falling silent at the start of each midterm” trauma the day that my math class opened the midterm review guide. If this is any indication that my success is not off to an optimistic start, then I don’t know what is. Surprisingly, though, I’ve found that I have been remotely capable of keeping up the entire “pleasant mood” façade. I want to believe it is because I know that I am more than capable of achieving my goal of passing each midterm, but truthfully, I think it’s just the coffee speaking. At this point, my only hope is that, by the time quarter three midterms approach, I will not feel compelled to write a follow up article on the further intensity of my levels of stress that await me in the future.

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To The Defeated Nursing Major, You'll Rise

You'll rise because every single day that you slip on your navy blue scrubs and fling your pretty little stethoscope around your neck, the little girl that you once were with the dream of saving lives someday will be silently nudging you to keep going.

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You will have weeks when you are defeated. Some mornings you won't be able to get out of bed and some days you won't be able to stop crying enough to go to class. You'll feel like nobody understands the stress that you are under, and you have absolutely nobody to talk to because they either don't get it or are dealing with their own meltdowns. There will be weeks that you want to change your major and give up on the whole thing. But, you'll rise.
You will miss football games, concerts, and nights out with the girls. There will be stretches of two or more weeks you'll go without seeing your mom, and months where you have to cancel on your best friend 4+ times because you have too much studying to do. There will be times where no amount of "I'm sorry" can make it up to your little brother when you miss his big football game or your grandparents when you haven't seen them in months. But, you'll rise.

You will have patients who tell you how little they respect nurses and that you won't be able to please no matter how hard you try. You will have professors who seem like their goal is to break you, especially on your bad days. You will encounter doctors who make you feel like the most insignificant person on the planet. You will leave class some days, put your head against your steering wheel and cry until it seems like there's nothing left to cry out. But, you'll rise.

You will fail tests that you studied so hard for, and you will wing some tests because you worked too late the night before. You will watch some of the smartest people you've ever known fail out because they simply aren't good test-takers. You will watch helplessly as your best friend falls apart because of a bad test grade and know that there is absolutely nothing you can do for her. There will be weeks that you just can't crack a smile no matter how hard you try. But, you'll rise.

You'll rise because you have to — because you've spent entirely too much money and effort to give up that easily. You'll rise because you don't want to let your family down. You'll rise because you're too far in to stop now. You'll rise because the only other option is failing, and we all know that nurses do not give up.

You'll rise because you remember how badly you wanted this, just three years ago as you were graduating high school, with your whole world ahead of you. You'll rise because you know there are people that would do anything to be in your position.

You'll rise because you'll have one patient during your darkest week that'll change everything — that'll hug you and remind you exactly why you're doing this, why this is the only thing you can picture yourself doing for the rest of your life.

You'll rise because every single day that you slip on your navy blue scrubs and fling your pretty little stethoscope around your neck, the little girl that you once were with the dream of saving lives someday will be silently nudging you to keep going.

You'll rise because you have compassion, you are selfless, and you are strong. You'll rise because even during the darkest weeks, you have the constant reminder that you will be changing the world someday.

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Odyssey, From A Creator's Point Of View

Writing for Odyssey is transitioning from the outside looking in, to the inside looking a million ways at once.

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It's 11:59 p.m. and I have two articles due tomorrow afternoon: two articles that are basically figments of my imagination at this point. When I was asked to write for Odyssey, I was ecstatic. I was a devout reader in high school and found every post so #relatable. During my short time as a "creator" for Odyssey, I've experienced what it's like to be on the other side of the articles.

Every post is not #relatable. This is a platform for anyone and everyone. I chose the articles I wanted to click on and read them, deemed them relatable, and clicked share. I, along with Odyssey's 700,000 something followers, did not go through and read every single article.

Being a creator has shown me that everyone has a voice, and by God, they're going to use it (rightfully so).

It can be disheartening at times to get what we think is a low number of page views when there are articles we don't necessarily agree with getting hundreds of Facebook shares. I don't crank out journalistic gold by any means, but being a writer isn't a walk in the park. It's stressful at times and even disappointing. Odyssey creators aren't paid, and even though it's liberating to be able to write about whatever our hearts desire, I'll be the first to admit that my life is just not that interesting.

When I first started writing for Odyssey, I vowed to never post anything basic like some things I have read in the past. If I'm going to dedicate the time it takes to write for a national platform, I'm going to publish things worth reading.

That vow is basically out the window now.

Simply stated, it's easy to write about things that are easy to write about. It's kind of like calling a Hail Mary play when it's the night before an article is due and there's been a topic in the back of your mind for days that you don't think is that great, but you think people might read. You just throw it out there and hope for the best. Being a creator gives you inside access to knowing what people are reading, what's popular, and what's working for other creators. Odyssey's demographic is not as diverse as it could or should be, so it's not hard to pick out something that the high school girl you once were will find relatable. Recently went through a breakup? Write about it. Watched a new show on Netflix? Write about it. When there's nothing holding you back, you have the freedom to literally put whatever you want online.

It's not easy coming out of your freshman year of college, one of the hardest years for any person, and being expected to whip up articles that everyone will love. Not everyone is going to love what I write. Heck, not everyone is going to like what I write. The First Amendment is a blessing and a curse. Not everyone is going to agree with you, and that's okay.

The beauty of Odyssey is that it highlights the fact that everyone DOES have a voice, and whether that voice coincides with your religious, political, or personal views isn't up to you.

You have the power to pick and choose what you want to read, relate to, and share. Remember that you have no way of knowing what every single person on the planet is going through and what they choose to write about reflects their own personal opinions, experiences, accomplishments, and hardships. Odyssey creators can spend weeks crafting articles they hope will break the Internet, but in return only get a few views. They can also pull all-nighters grasping at straws just trying to reach the minimum word requirement and end up writing the best thing since sliced bread.

I guess what I'm getting at here is that even though there are posts out there that are so easy for us to relate to, that's not always the goal for writers. We write what we feel, and if there's nothing to write about, we write what we think other people feel. The kicker is that we don't truly know what other people are feeling. You might hurt someone's feelings with your words. You might make someone cry with your story because they felt like they were alone and finally, finally, someone else feels the same way. You might trigger someone and get hateful comments. You might even change someone's life with your words.

The moral of the story is that words are pretty powerful, whether we choose to believe it or not.

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