StuDYING For Midterms: Part Three

StuDYING For Midterms: Part Three

As you know, I don't review. I road trip.

29
views

"College update round two: midterms are upon us yet again, and I thought I understood what to expect. It is safe to say that, in comparison to last quarter, I am enrolled in significantly more challenging classes than I had been two months ago. Not only have I found myself consumed with hours of homework, but I have also found that my levels of stress have reached an all-time high."

This passage was written on February 7, 2018 as part of the series discussing my never-ending struggle with midterms. I remember sitting down to write this piece earlier in the year, as I had just returned from a trip to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where I spent the entire weekend visiting with friends instead of studying for my upcoming rigorous tests.

Looking back on it I often laugh, realizing I had another trip to the same location planned for the following weekend. I had noticed that, during my first round of midterms, I had planned a weekend road trip to visit friends at the University of Iowa. A wave of concern rose over me after contemplating why, at this point in every quarter, do I feel the need to take a road trip and avoid all responsibilities. I told myself that it was likely not a major deal - that it was just an odd coincidence. That is, until I ended up at U of I this past weekend, also known as the weekend I should have been studying for fall quarter midterms.

There is nothing that I love more than visiting my friends who are studying at different colleges than I am. Yet, my timing continuously seems to be off in this regard. This is not to say that I do not pay for it, though. After driving home on Sunday afternoon, I mustered up the courage to log on to D2L and dive into my midterm reviews. Being the procrastinator that I am, I told myself that there was nothing to be overwhelmed about, and that I could easily hit the books for a few short hours and excel on these tests. What I opened my laptop to that Sunday afternoon I will never forget. I found discussions upon articles upon papers with deadlines rapidly approaching. I stared solemnly at the screen and found myself riddled with anxiety. But, did I regret my road trip? Not in the slightest.

I tell myself that next quarter will be different, but in actuality, I am more excited to see where I will travel to next.

Popular Right Now

8 Things You Should Never Say To An Education Major

"Is your homework just a bunch of coloring?"
62890
views

Yes, I'm an Education major, and yes, I love it. Your opinion of the field won't change my mind about my future. If you ever happen to come across an Education major, make sure you steer clear of saying these things, or they might hold you in from recess.

1. "Is your homework just a bunch of coloring?"

Um, no, it's not. We write countless lesson plans and units, match standards and objectives, organize activities, differentiate for our students, study educational theories and principles, and write an insane amount of papers on top of all of that. Sometimes we do get to color though and I won't complain about that.

2. "Your major is so easy."

See above. Also, does anyone else pay tuition to have a full-time job during their last semester of college?

3. "It's not fair that you get summers off."

Are you jealous? Honestly though, we won't really get summers off. We'll probably have to find a second job during the summer, we'll need to keep planning, prepping our classroom, and organizing to get ready for the new school year.

4. “That's a good starter job."

Are you serious..? I'm not in this temporarily. This is my career choice and I intend to stick with it and make a difference.

5. “That must be a lot of fun."

Yes, it definitely is fun, but it's also a lot of hard work. We don't play games all day.

6. “Those who can't, teach."

Just ugh. Where would you be without your teachers who taught you everything you know?

7. “So, you're basically a babysitter."

I don't just monitor students, I teach them.

8. “You won't make a lot of money."

Ah yes, I'm well aware, thanks for reminding me. Teachers don't teach because of the salary, they teach because they enjoy working with students and making a positive impact in their lives.

Cover Image Credit: BinsAndLabels

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

10 Study Habits You Should Never Break

Tips and tricks to surviving finals and midterms.

57
views

It's starting to become that time of year again - wrapping up the semester and preparing for the dreaded week of finals and mid-terms. I couldn't be more excited to be done with high school. But finals stink. I luckily don't have many classes that are going to require taking a test, mine are mostly projects.

All throughout high school, I had really struggled with testing and study habits. I didn't know how to study and therefore continued to do poorly because of my study habits or lack of. It was not until my junior year in high school, I had found my way of studying and it has worked for me for every test since. I color coat everything and write things down a million times. It is time-consuming but it is worth it in the end. You just have to find what works with you and stick with it. Here are some tips and tricks to hopefully help you with your study habits. I wish I had someone to tell me these things when I was struggling at the start of high school.

1. Time management

Don't be silly and study the night before the test and expect to do well. Some people can actually do this but I am a person who has to work their tail off for what kind of grades I receive so studying the night before a test would result in me not doing well. But it is different for everyone. What I typically do is if I know the test date ahead of time, I write it down in my planner and then as we learn something I add it to a notecard so as we go on with a unit I remember what we have learned in the start of the unit. I typically study a week prior to the test.

2. Find a study space

I like when my environment is completely quiet, I find it hard for me to focus when I am surrounded by noise. I usually study in my room or somewhere where no one is at

3. Choose a style of studying you like

I am a freak when it comes to studying. I am a very visual person. I will read the chapters in the book, highlight the important stuff, take notes and color coat them, highlight them. Draw diagrams or pictures if needed. And sometimes write small important things a couple of times. Yes, it's time-consuming but it has gotten me to not fail my test. With more unvisual classes like math, I write a notecard of all the formulas and buttons I will need for that unit. I do all of this as we go through each unit. I also use Quizlet to help me remember vocabulary words.

4. Actually do the study guides or Quizlets, they help

I complete the study guides a couple of times. Sounds crazy but it helps me memorize stuff so much better. There are tons of resources out on the internet, use them. Quizlet, Books online etc can all be valuable resources, just got to know what is available. Sometimes my friends will make a Quizlet and we will have the same class and I will use her Quizlet. Why make what's already made for you?

5. Write things out

I love technology and all but I think some of us have gotten away from writing things actually down on a notebook. Believe it or not, it has been proven that physically writing things out helps you memorize things better. I use a notebook for class and color coat my own notes. I also use flashcards for vocab words and color coat them as well. As you can tell I love color coating.

6. Have a study buddy

Personally I study better alone but when I do study with groups we bounce ideas off each other to get a better understanding of the material. It again depends on how you like to study.

7. Eliminate distractions

I used to have a problem with getting distracted from being on my phone and then I'd realize I just wasted 30 minutes scrolling through Instagram when I could have been studying. So turn your phone off or put it where you can't see it because it really does shorten your time of studying without being on it.

8. Use memory games (pneumonic devices) 

This helps me so much! When I am working on a test I always remember pneumonic devices before anything else.

9. Take your time

Don't rush through the material, you'll get it eventually. If you don't know it, highlight it and come back. Also if you have already mastered and memorized a topic, don't keep studying that study the things you don't know and haven't mastered.

10.  Find what works best for you!

You have to find out what works for you and what doesn't. Your study habits are completely unique to you. If something works for you, continue to do that.

Related Content

Facebook Comments