Why It's STILL Okay To Miss Your Mom

Why It's STILL Okay To Miss Your Mom

Long-distance sucks.
55
views

It's your sophomore year of college, so naturally you think you know what you're getting into. You've already done all of this before: the work, the parties, the being away from home. The butterflies that you feel as you pull up to school are those of excitement rather than last year's dread. You are confident and you are ready. Or so you thought.

Your mom moves you in and maybe you feel a little pang in your heart as she leaves, but nothing close to last year. And maybe you shed a few tears, but again, nothing compared to last year's flood. And so she leaves and you "ooooh" and "aaaaah" over your friends new rooms, and you go out to meals, and you go out at night, and you watch A LOT of Netflix: all trying to keep your mind occupied.

But you can't--not entirely and not all the time. And when you come home from classes the first day after your professor berated your entire class and you spilled your iced coffee only minutes after buying it there is only one thing that you really want: your mom.

Yes, you've done this before. No, that doesn't mean it is all of a sudden easy to be away from your primary source of comfort, especially after you got used to being around home for an entire 4 months.

So the next time you start missing your parents despite being a sophomore, don't be embarrassed. Know that plenty of people are right there with you, and know that you are lucky to have something so exciting to come home to.

Popular Right Now

Dear Dad, I Hope You Know

I hope you know that you are my best friend.
1513
views

Dear Dad,

I hope you know that I love your silly jokes, even when I say I don't.

Throughout my entire life, you have always managed to get on my last nerve with your countless jokes and teasing. However, now that I'm older, I realize you do it all out of love. So for that, I thank you. Thank you so much for always knowing how to make me smile or laugh, even on the worst of days, I know I can always count on you to have my back.

I hope you know that I'm so incredibly thankful for you and everything you do.

You always work your hardest to make sure you provide for our family and then, to top it all off, you're still there at the end of the day supporting us in all that we do. From sporting events to dance recitals and even to sorority banquets, you're always sitting in the front row cheering us on to reach our full potential.

I hope you know I'm so appreciative that you're the best mechanic around.

Because my car has been through the ringer too many times to count and you're always there to figure out what went wrong. Not only that, thank you so much for always changing my oil or replacing my brake light when it went out. I know I may not always act like it, but I'm so appreciative of all the little things you do for me.

I hope you know that I'm sorry.

When I was younger, I wasn't always the most pleasant daughter, and for that I'm sorry. I'm sorry for not listening to you when you told me to take out the trash or to clean the kitchen. I'm sorry for yelling at you, talking back to you, and being a big pain in the butt, but I'm so thankful that you still love me anyways regardless of how many times I screw up.

I hope you know that you inspire me.

Not only does your hard work and dedication to your work and your family inspire me, but your overwhelming sense of love and gratitude you have for everyone around you does as well. Even though you try and act tough, you're such a big teddy bear and all of your friends and family love you for that.

I hope you know that you are my best friend.

And for right now, the only man in my life that I need. I pray every single day that I can find half the man to marry that you are. Thank you for always being that example for my sisters and I to look up too.

I hope you know that I am here for you--until the very end.

So I know I stole this line from my article to Mom, but I want you to know that it still applies to you and I mean it wholeheartedly. I don't mean to make you cry or anything -- and I'll laugh at you if you are, but I want you to know that when the time comes, I'm going to be there for you just like all of these years you've been here for me. I will be there to support you, talk with you, laugh with you, cry with you, and love you for all of my life.

Dad, I can't imagine my life without you. Thank you for being YOU.

I love you,

Your daughter.

Cover Image Credit: Flickr

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Your Relationship With Your Parents Changes Over Time, Here's Why

Four ways in which your relationship with your parents change from age eighteen to twenty-two.

26
views

Over spring break I had time to think about all the different ways in which my relationship with my parents has changed throughout college. We've definitely had our ups and downs, but as graduation grows closer, I take time to note how far we have come. From freshman to senior year of college I have undergone a drastic change in how I appreciate my parents.

At eighteen, I wanted to get as far away from my parents as possible. I was going to college in order to be independent, study, and hopefully make a career for myself. Nothing could stop me and no one could give me advice. I was stubborn and hungry to explore the new life that awaited me. I didn't realize how hard it would be being on my own for the first time ever. I had never even been to camp let alone moved to a different state not knowing a single soul. I was happy for the new opportunities but quickly realized how much I had been sheltered. Initially, I resented my parents for my little life experience going into college but as the years have passed I realized I can't be so immature to put my lack of knowledge on them. As an adult I now make things work and advocate for myself. Your struggles as an individual humble you so you can come back together better and stronger than before.

Here are some ways in which the relationship between you and your parents change:

1. You don't live together 24/7, so you appreciate time spent with them.

When you're not sharing a space with your parents and they are not there to nag at you about chores, you finally get to know them as people. As an adult yourself you begin to relate to them in ways that weren't possible in childhood.

2. You realize what is worth fighting over and what is not.

You have learned how to live on your own and set boundaries. As an adult, you come back home knowing what can be improved upon within the relationship and what are things you can let go.

3. You have experience with adulthood now and can understand how really great they are.

Adult struggles are real and now as someone older and wiser, you have experienced a great many. You then begin to realize how your parents took on all these responsibilities plus the responsibility of raising/providing for you. You don't know how they did it, but suddenly you're mad at sixteen-year-old you who fought them on everything.

4. They are your biggest support system in wanting you to achieve your dreams.

There is no one quite as invested in your dreams like your parents. When you have no one to turn to and nothing to give you that extra boost of motivation, parents are there. They may not be perfect but they love you more than anyone so call your parents.

Related Content

Facebook Comments