Since I was in maybe 6th or 7th grade, I've always dreamed of being a doctor. Don't ask me why, but for some reason, I just up and decided I wanted to pursue one of the hardest possible careers that exist. Anatomy, science, and math have always been interests of mine, but not necessarily strong-suits. These areas, for me, always take extra work and studying to excel on exams and homework versus English and history. Regardless, I ignored this. Why? I am dumb. I didn't pay attention to what my personal strengths are, but rather what my interests alone were. I guess what I am trying to say here is, through personal experience, I've learned that it's important to pay attention to what your personal talents and interests are and to find a good middle ground. This can apply to any degree, not just a science degree.

Interest in science has increased over time. As technology and medicine have advanced, people have recognized that there is a need for more people in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) field. There are more jobs available for people who pursue STEM degrees, and those jobs generally offer more money. According to Business Insider, non-STEM majors earn an average of $15,500 less per year starting salary than STEM majors. This is enticing to many but can be misleading. Science degrees are very difficult to earn, which is why they offer such high-earning salaries and give so many job opportunities after college.

If you are actually good at math and science and know the first 100 numbers of pi off the top of your head, by all means, feel free to become a neurosurgeon or aerospace engineer, but I had to learn my lesson the hard way. Just know that nobody's opinion matters but your own and this is your life. The decisions you make during these four years will affect your career for the rest of your life. Don't pursue a degree just because it will make you a lot of money. Pursue a career because you are good at it and you actually enjoy it.