ivan basil turchin

You cannot seem to go through one day lately without hearing Fox, CNN, or even MSNBC talk about the dangers of "Russian Collusion" in our elections. This article, however, will pertain to some much more important information, well at least to me.

In the winter of 1822, Ivan Vasilyevich Turchaninov was born to a Cossack family in Russia. Turchaniov was quite interested in the military. His father was a major which helped him to obtain many promotions, this also allowed him to serve in the Hungarian Campaign during the Hungarian War. Well skilled he graduated from General Staff Military School in 1848.

As an officer, Turchin served in The Crimean War, where he spent the last year of the was as a reserve unit in Poland, this action infuriated the crazed Cossack. Ordered to report to Moscow for governmental celebrations, Turchin reported ill. Instead of going to the Spa in Marienbad, Austria, Turchin and his wife went to England. From England, the couple sailed to the United States.

In August of 1856, the couple arrived in New York. They quickly moved to Chicago where Mr. Turchin gained employment for the Illinois Central Railroad. The lived for those years in Chicago until 1861 when the Civil War broke out.

John Basil Turchin quickly began discussing with the United States, federal officers to gain employment in the army. On June 22, 1861, Ivan Basil Turchin is commissioned as a Colonel for the 19th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The regiment left Chicago by train on July 12, 1861.

For the next few months, The 19th served as railroad guard and worked to disperse Confederate troops. On the evening of September 17, 1861, the 19th was involved in a major train wreck that killed many and wounded others involved. After already being given orders, Turchin personally telegraphs President Lincoln to notify him of the wreck, and request marching orders.

Turchin then marched to Tenessee where he met with General Buell, where he was given orders to march to Huntsville/Athens Alabama and guard the rail line there. Around April 15 of 1862, Turchin's federal forces marched back into the town of Athens from Huntsville.

Starting into the town of Athens, it is rumored Turchin told his men, "I close my eyes for two hours". Turchin's men then sacked the town of Athens, I would like to add that many accounts of this event consider it a pillaging or even a "RAPE". These terms are obviously not good so what exactly did Turchin do you might ask? Turchin was in retaliation because the city was not previously surrendered to him, and many women turned their backs as he marched in (proving their disrespect for the Cossack).

I would like to add an excerpt from (Southern History 411 2018) "Later testimony indicated that numerous homes, offices, and stores were pillaged. Money, jewelry, dishware, silver, watches, clothes, shoes, medical supplies, medical instruments, and anything else of value were stolen. Furniture, carpets, artwork, and fixtures were destroyed. Books and especially bibles were viciously destroyed.

Numerous testimonies indicated that the soldiers' language to women was rude, insulting, threatening, and vulgar. One white woman, the pregnant wife of a Confederate cavalryman, was singled out and gang-raped, shortly thereafter dying from a miscarriage. Several black servant girls were raped, and several more had to fend off attempted rapes. The commander made his headquarters in the home of a prominent citizen and refused to let his sick daughter receive any medical treatment.

She subsequently died. Shots were fired into homes and terror reigned. Some of the troops billeted themselves in the slave quarters on a nearby plantation for weeks, debauching the females. They roamed with the males over the surrounding country, plundering, and pillaging."

Moving on from the rape of Athens, Turchin also had some weird power craze that he fixated on. repeatedly throughout the war, you see this Chicagoan newspaper recommending Turchin for a promotion(he was personal friends with the newspaper owners). If you're anything like myself you also asked, what in the hell kind of influence does a newspaper have on a military decision? Little to none to be exact.

You also see throughout the war Turchin requesting commisions (military ranks) to be revoked, he even threated resignation should the requests be denied. He, however, never resigned. Secretary of War, Stanton denied numerous revocation requests.

When news of the Raping of Athen got to Gen. Buell, Turchin was relieved of duty, and ordered to rejoin the regiment. He was then scheduled for a court-martial hearing on August 6, 1862. Before becoming president, James A, Garfield served on the court-martial committee of Turchin. The evidence was presented, and closing arguments made, Turchin was found guilty of 6 counts of criminal activity while acting as an officer. His punishment was dismissal from the Army.

One of those specific counts was having his wife in the camp and field with him. Turchin's wife Madame Turchin or Nadine rode a horse while in the field with the 19th Illinois. It is reported that when the train wrecked in September of 1861, Nadine tore her skirt into bandages to help the soldiers, Seems womanly right? It is stated in an article that when the 19th left to fight in the Western Theatre of the war, Nadine rode in the saddle leaving Quincy with a revolver and dagger on her belt. In another article, it says Nadine rode close to 50 miles a day with the regiment. In the spring of 1862 Turchin became sick and rode in an ambulance, Nadine took his place and led the entire regiment into battle.

When Turchin was arrested for his court-martial, Nadine disappeared from the unit, she was then heard from in Washington and later, Chicago. While traveling she hoped to gain sympathy and a promotion for her incarcerated husband.

When Turchin was finally convicted and dismissed, he and Nadine traveled back to Chicago where he was being hosted by a public reception. In the middle of the reception, A United States Army officer marched down the aisle and handed Turchin a promotion commission as Brigadier General. This order was sent at the request of Abraham Lincoln, President. The Commission was dated July 17, 1862, one month prior to Turchin's court-martial hearing.

Since his court-martial jurors were all Colonels, they had no rank to judge a Brigadier General. The case was dismissed and assumed, void.

It can easily be assumed that Turchin was eager to get back into the field, Then President Lincoln personally writes E. Stanton, Secretary of War to request Turchin be issued a brigade to command.

In 1864 we hear yet again of "Madame Turchin", On reports of Ringgold Gap, Georgian in 1864 Major James Connolly wrote that he called on Nadine as she had been in the field for nearly three years with Ivan Turchin.

In his later life, Turchin worked as a patent solicitor and published many books, one of which Chickamauga, was a full information on the battle. Turchin's health quickly began to diminish and he soon became unable to farm or make a living for himself. His mind soon began to fade and one evening Turchin took his library into the yard of his home and built a fire. Neighbors are rumored to have attempted to save the books, but with little success. On April 18, 1901, Turchin was declared mentally insane.

He died on June 18, 1901.

I did not know much about this Ivan Turchin before, or why he received special treatment and what seems to be, blatant disregard for order within his military regiment. Turchin was never punished for his WAR CRIMES he committed against the State of Alabama, especially Athens.

I do not understand why Abraham Lincoln loved this man with such regard to allowing him back into the military service after a proven, guilty court-martial hearing. This is one of the many examples of how badly the northern army behaved against MY Homeland, with little to no punishment for their actions.

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