A Quick Look at 18-Wheeler Accident Lawsuits and their Attorneys

A Quick Look at 18-Wheeler Accident Lawsuits and their Attorneys

18-Wheeler Accident Lawsuits
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The worst accidents are often the result of larger vehicles going the wrong way. Be it a train accident, a bus accident or a mishap caused by an 18-wheeler, the extent of inflicted physical damage is obviously greater than the one caused by smaller vehicles. This is why there is a strong and growing demand for lawyers who are competent in handling accident cases attributed to trucks, 18-wheelers, buses and so forth.

The attorneys well versed in personal injury cases are likely to sort out the issues dealing with another person’s negligence or mistake. Though there is little difference in the nature of physical injuries inflicted by a car, motorcycle, bus or truck accident, the ways of dealing with their compensation claims is quite different. For instance, the actual difference in the case of a general auto accident and the one caused by an 18-wheeler exists in the severity of injuries inflicted on the victims.

In most cases, general car accidents would result in neck or whiplash injuries that lead to severe soft tissue pain that may lessen with time. On the other hand, an 18-wheeler accident may cause grave damages to the victim’s vehicle along with inflicting severe physical injuries that may lead to closed head injuries, fractures, herniated discs, or untimely deaths. In other words, a typical car accident is unlikely to cause very serious injuries and thus has a lower insurance coverage than the claim possible for accidents caused by 18-wheelers or larger vehicles. This makes a lot of sense as the probability of death in case of accidents involving larger vehicles is much higher than that in case of smaller cars and motorcycles.




While a simple whiplash injury may render the involvement of an attorney fruitless, a more serious kind of injury would surely require the intervention of a lawyer for filing rightful claims with the concerned authorities. In case you have suffered injuries because of an accident linked to an 18-wheeler, it would be wise to get in touch with an experienced attorney who can handle your compensation claim to perfection.

These days, almost all reputed firms dealing with personal injury cases are known to take up 18-wheeler accident claims for injuries as well. Lawyers having adequate knowledge of this sub specialty field assess the severity of injuries before agreeing to take up the case. In general, reliable accident law firms readily accept cases that are a result of 18-wheelers buses, trucks and other large-sized vehicles.



In more fortunate cases, the victims are pleasantly surprised upon receiving deserving compensation from their insurance companies; however, such instances are not very common. The bill issued by the health insurance companies may be higher or lower than the settlement amount. If the amount is lower than the expected or real-time expenses of hospitalization and medical treatment, then further attempts for renegotiation can be made with the help of a dedicated 18-wheeler accident claim lawyer.


Are you ready to hire a good lawyer for your 18-wheeler accident case today?

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To The Nursing Major

Is it all worth it?
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"You're going to feel like quitting. You're going to struggle. You'll have days where you'll wonder, 'what's it all for?' You'll have days when people attempt to break you down, or challenge your intelligence, skills and right to be where you are. You'll have moments when you question your own abilities, and perhaps your sanity - but you'll rise. You'll rise, because your strength as a nurse is not determined by one grade, one shift or one job - it's an ongoing journey of learning, honor, humility and a chance to make even the smallest difference in the lives of your patients."

Don't ever give up on achieving your dreams to be a nurse. Keep pushing forward, no matter how hard it is. Nursing is not an easy major. You will have very little, if any, time to do anything other than study. But just think about how great it will feel to connect with a patient, pray with them, and even save his or her life. This will make all of the late night studying, weekly breakdowns, countless cups of coffee, and tests so hard all you want to do is cry, worth it. To see a patient's face light up when you walk in his or her room will make your heart melt and you'll know you chose the right major.

The kind of nurse you will be isn't based on a test grade, it's based on your heart for the people you are caring for. You may have failed a class, but don't let that ruin you. Try again and keep pushing toward your goal. Don't allow others around you to drag you down and tell you you aren't good enough to be a nurse. Show them how strong you are and that you will never give up. There will be days when all you want to do is quit, I know I question my major more than once a week; however, there is a patient out there that needs you and your caring heart. You can do this, have faith in yourself that you can move mountains.

I will say that you definitely must have a heart for nursing. Personally, I want to be a Pediatric Oncologist and work at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Just the thought of those precious children going through the hardest part of their lives, keeps me going so that I can be there for them. I want to be a light to my patients and their families during a dark time. When I feel like giving up, I just think about how many lives I have the chance to touch and I keep on going. So when you feel like giving up, just think about your future patients and how you can make a difference, even if its only for one person. I love the quote from Katie Davis that states, "I will not change the world, Jesus will do that. But I can change the world for one person. So I will keep loving, one person at a time." Even though this quote is about foreign missions, I believe it fits the mold for nursing as well. Nurses have the opportunity to change the world for people everyday. Just remember that, smile, don't give up, and keep pushing toward your goal.

Cover Image Credit: chla.org

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You Know Economic Capital and Social Capital, How About Energy Capital?

Gaining capital = gaining mobility.

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The most over-used phrase in America is "All you have to do is work hard to get ahead." Another one is the classic, "You can't have a million dollar dream with a minimum wage work ethic." Both of these exhausted ideas are busted by looking at the importance of economic and social capital.

Obviously, our capitalist system is not an equal one. One of the ways in which we're distinctly separated is by our economic and social classes. When we advance by making gains, we accumulate capital, which mobilizes us and enables us to more easily climb and gain more capital. The growth, then, is exponential. If we are born into a great deal of capital, it is immediately easier to gain more.

Economic capital is clear enough; we may call this wealth. It's about our money, our assets.

Social capital, on the other hand, is our position in society. It includes our network and the power of those with whom we hold relationships, our education, and the communities in which we are raised. For example, people raised by parents with college degrees have social capital because they are in positions to understand and help out with the processes of applications and financial aid and the dynamics of post-secondary education.

But there's another kind of capital that plays a role in our mobility. This is energy capital.

This is where my issue with the "minimum wage work ethic" concept arises. I've worked near-minimum-wage jobs. I've worked in fast food. And in every case, I am confident in stating that my coworkers and I worked extremely hard. When I worked at McDonald's, I would go home every day and collapse on the couch because it had taken everything out of me. Physically, my feet were killing me. Emotionally, I was exhausted and tense from being mistreated by customers who dehumanized me. And since I also wasn't making enough money to have extra economic capital, I had to dispense even more emotional energy once I got home to stress over finances.

One of the biggest critiques of fast food workers like myself is that we just need to work toward another job. Yes, that's very true. But the last thing I wanted to do when I got home was get on the job hunt; all I really wanted was to go to sleep. And since I had no connections (less social capital), this job search would take a lot more effort than someone who could contact a family friend.

Meanwhile, there exist people at the top who can make a great deal of money without working all that hard. Some can even get away with no work at all. Some can also then pay for cooks and nannies and housekeepers and wealth managers and tax professionals and tutors for their kids and plumbers and electricians and repairpeople and restaurants and so on and so forth. And they don't have to dispense nearly as much energy.

Now, I don't want to insist that energy capital is always linked to higher economic or social capital. Many people with a lot of economic and social capital work extremely hard. Similarly, there do exist people with no economic and social capital who are in that position because they expend no energy at all.

However, it is necessary to consider energy as an additional criterion in building the capacity for safety, power, and mobility in society.

This is also tied up with privilege. People in positions of privilege (i.e. men, white people, Christians, heterosexual and cisgender people, temporarily able-bodied people, etc.) need not expend the energy to consider stereotypes and prejudices on a day-to-day basis; they can focus all of their energy on their mobility, which already comes easier.

Extra energy is extra capital. Know where you're privileged.

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