Why I Write The Way I Do And How I Got Better

Why I Write The Way I Do And How I Got Better

I always wanted to play the piano.

57
views

I always wanted to play the piano. I loved the way it sounded. I loved how people could move their fingers across the keys to create something beautiful for everyone to enjoy.

When I first started writing in middle school, there was always a topic and a rubric you had to follow to make the grades. I would always try to put my spin on it and wrote whatever I saw fit. I took inspiration from movies and books without even noticing it.

When my senior year came around, I was miserable. I wanted to get away from my hometown and everyone in it. I wanted to write myself out of it, so I did. I began a small blog where I just posted candidly about how I was feeling. I didn't care if it got a lot of views- or any at all for that matter. I just wanted a place to compile feelings I couldn't describe and put them into words. It helped me to think about everything and think through it all individually forming it into sentences. I realized, when I stopped focusing on trying to please someone or follow a rubric, my best work came from my own thoughts.

Before heading off to UGA, I started writing on Odyssey. I struggled with finding my brand and what I wanted to write about since this was more than just inspirational posts I wrote when I was bored and needed to sort out my feelings. I tried to write about what was interesting to me. Some I was proud of. Some I wasn't.

But my writing improved when I did. When I finally got my feet wet at school I learned a lot about myself and what I cared about. I didn't want to just fill a word count with meaningless topics. I wanted to write what I wanted to read, what I wanted to talk about. I wanted to share my life with a public audience. I wrote the best about what closest to me- and that was my life itself. I wrote about sorority recruitment and how I felt turning nineteen and how going to UGA flipped my world upside down. I began to write what I casually talked about. I constantly gave advice and filled my mom in on what I was doing, so the words came easy. When you write what you speak, it's simple.

Writing is one of those things that doesn't come with a formula sheet or a test bank. You just have to do it.

You have to think out-loud but instead of saying it, writing it, The grammar and organization will work itself out later, but the thoughts won't always. You have to always write the first thing you think. Use the keyboard as your tongue. It's your way to communicate except with so many more people than your mouth could ever reach.

It's like a puzzle. You have to figure out not just how to arrange what you want to say but place it in the correct spot at the right angle for people to understand the full picture. You have to see the way things fit together, the way the flow. You have to look at what angle captures what you're truly trying to show. You just have to solve it.

The truth is: Everyone has their own style of writing and what works for them. Some people brainstorm list after list of ideas while others wait for a creative kick and are instantly inspired. Some people care more about grammar structure and proper punctuation while others just want their ideas to be read.

I always wanted to write. I loved the way it sounded. I loved how people could move their fingers across the keys to create something beautiful for everyone to enjoy.

Popular Right Now

Dear Taylor Swift, Christians Are Not Homophobic Bigots, Sincerely, The Majority Of Christians

Taylor, you need to calm down when talking about how most Christians act.

332
views

When Taylor Swift released her newest single "You Need to Calm Down" last Friday, I didn't agree with the entire message of the song, mainly because of its heavy political overtones. But as the great Dick Clark once said, "It's got a good beat, and you can dance to it." So, for what it is, it's really easy to dance to this song, and I can see it becoming a pretty big hit.

But then the video came out, and I saw something that really bothered me.

In the music video for "You Need to Calm Down", Taylor is seen partying and hanging out with multiple LGBT+ icons in honor of Pride Month, such as the hosts of Queer Eye, RuPaul, and Ellen Degeneres. There's also a moment with Taylor, dressed as French fries, renewing her friendship with Katy Perry, who's dressed as a hamburger, which is as amazing as it sounds.

However, there's another cast of characters which acts as a foil to the happiness and colorful joy which is taking place in the video. There's a group of protesters surrounding the trailer park where Taylor and all her friends live. They're all dirty, buck-toothed, and dressed like your typical redneck stereotypes. They're also holding up protest signs while screaming at everyone in the trailer park. I saw one of the signs said something about Adam and Eve, and I realized most of the protesters were most likely meant to represent Christians.

And that...didn't sit well with me at all.

I know that these people never explicitly said they were Christians in the video, none of them even wore a cross. But, whenever someone sees anyone protesting rallies and organizations such as Pride, I can guarantee you that most of the time, the first thing people think is that they're from the Westboro Baptist Church, which is notorious for its protests. And I won't lie, there are some Christians who act that way.

But if you haven't heard this yet, let me be the first to tell you that not all Christians act like that. In fact, most of them don't act that way.

Christians don't agree with the LGBT+ lifestyle because of what the apostle Paul wrote in the book of 1 Corinthians (1 Corinthians 6:9-10). However, Jesus never once taught that just because you don't agree with a person doesn't mean they're automatically your enemy (Matthew 5:44). Christians are supposed to represent the love of the Savior of the world, which encompasses every and all aspects of humanity. This definitely includes people whose lifestyles we don't agree with. By not showing love to certain types of people, we are directly going against one of Jesus's greatest commandments.

Not agreeing with people is one of the cornerstones of humanity. It's a divisive world out there to be sure, but that doesn't mean people from any side of the debate need to perpetuate the division. Grouping all Christians into one group of hateful bigots is no different than Christians grouping all the members of the LGBT+ community into one group of evil people. One of the key elements of Christianity is showing people who have different beliefs from us the same love Jesus would show to anyone. And I know I'm not the only Christian who wants to show love to people of all walks of life. I may be the only Jesus they ever see in their lives, and we all wish to express the same love to others.

So Taylor, it looks like you're the one who needs to calm down on this issue.

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

The Sad Reality Of Losing My Best Friend

I had been your friend. I wish you stayed mine.

133
views

When I think of you, I think of blue flannels and acoustic guitar strings, the smell of cigarettes and metal, the first day of August, long study sessions, the seventies, roses, earl grey tea, greek yogurt, waking early and sleeping late, the view on top of the Blue Ridge Mountains, black coffee, callouses, long walks by yourself at the first hour of dawn, parking tickets, the smell after it rains, Bach's Cello Suite, Polaroid photos, the indifference in your voice the last time we spoke.

My first two years of college were charted by the hours I spent studying and taking long drives with you. I was in a new city, a new apartment, and no one to talk to. There was such peace and excitement in the days we spent together that I wanted to trust, and forgot I trusted, that we would always be friends. When even that changed, I needed a routine to anchor myself to this strange life. In the morning, I'd wake up early to go to the gym, walk along Lake Herrick, or get breakfast at Panera Bread. After class, I'd stay on campus and get my homework done where there are no distractions and the campus scene to remind me I was here to get good grades. If I wasn't doing school work, I was reading in the Founder's Garden. If I started to feel sad, I'd write how I felt in my journal. Writing helps because it makes me feel soothed by what I wrote, even though there's nothing to feel soothed by, much less my own words. At the end of the day, I'd write down why that day was a good one: I got out of bed, I attended class, I emailed my advisor, I finished one chapter, I learned something new online, I went to a coffee shop or a public outing, each movement was good movement. I also wrote down my plans for the next day: take a long walk along the Beltline in Atlanta, read at that coffee shop down the street I'd never been to, go to the museum, buy tickets to that concert, learn how to paint, ask a classmate out to lunch, sign up for that yoga class, visit other places I found on the top 10 places to visit in Athens on The Odyssey. Not every day had to be productive, some days I genuinely wanted to lie in bed and watch Netflix.

Deleting social media was crucial. I wasn't trying to show anyone that I was better. I wasn't trying to be better at all. in Mark Manson's The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck, "The desire for a more positive experience is itself a negative experience. And, paradoxically, the acceptance of one's negative experience is itself a positive experience." When I went off the grid, I accepted the fact that I was lonely, and I accept this loneliness because with it comes the ability to learn to not depend on others for fun, the experience of dealing with sadness and hurt, and being my own therapist. I had been your friend. I wish you stayed mine, but I will be okay that you didn't.

Related Content

Facebook Comments