My Parent's Let Me Make Mistakes & I'm So Grateful They Did

My Parent's Let Me Make Mistakes And I'm So Grateful They Did

Learning to deal with small let downs as a child instill me the values of hard work, gratitude, and appreciation.

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I am not a parent and I am not trying to say that there is one right way to raise children. I am just simply stating my appreciation for the way my parents raised me. I see kids as a part of my future. I want to be a mom (eventually). I am sure that when I become a mother there are things that I will do differently than my parents but this is something I hope to emulate.

I remember in 4th grade I had forgotten a homework assignment at school. My mother was also a 4th-grade teacher so I figured that since she had the same assignment in her teacher book, I could just use that. I was wrong. My mom told me to figure it out the way a child who didn't have extra access to the assignment would.

I remember being absolutely livid. I couldn't understand why my mom would not just simply give me an extra copy of the assignment. After all, it was much more work for her to drive me back to school so I could look for to there and to look for the number of my classmate's parent so I could call and ask my classmate to tell me the list of words or whatever it was that we needed to use.

After that though, I was much more responsible for bringing my homework wrong. Don't get me wrong, I was 10 so I'm sure I still forgot things plenty of times and if it was a particularly stressful time or every once and a while my parents would do things like give me the list of words.

For the most part, though they taught me that actions have consequences and to take responsibility for what I did. If I worked really hard but didn't get the grade I wanted my parents would acknowledge the effort and hard work I put in and then encourage me to think of other ways to study or to go speak with the teacher for help. My parents never called my teachers to complain about grades but they did encourage me and my brother to work harder next time, or if we thought the grade was truly unfair, to speak with the teacher ourselves.

This skill has helped me tremendously during the beginning of my adult life. I am able to respectfully voice my concerns to my professors, even when I don't get the outcome I want. Now that I have a job, I am able to speak with my bosses about concerns I have.

All of this being said, I am still a teenager. I made mistakes and my parents always gave consequences, that I hated at the time. I mean let's be honest what teenage girl likes losing her cell phone privileges. However, this just reinforced the notion that actions have consequences - good or bad.

I am so much more confident in myself and in my own abilities than I would have been otherwise. I still feel comfortable going to my parents with problems. My parents still offer me support and guidance but ultimately I know they trust me, and I trust my own abilities to be responsible and sure of my own decisions. I am able to articulate my thought process on decisions that maybe they might have felt differently about.

My parents and I are close. I appreciate all of their help and I really appreciate them providing a safe place for me to make mistakes and learn the consequence. I appreciate them helping shape me into the person I am today.

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I'm Not 'Spoiled,' I Just Won't Apologize For Having Great Parents

Having supportive parents is one of the best things that ever happened to me.

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When I tell people that I am the baby of my family, there is always a follow-up question asking if I am spoiled. As I was a child, perhaps the situation was a little different because I did not receive material things but instead got my way or rarely was punished. I was most likely spoiled rotten in that sense, especially by my grandparents. Fast forward to the age of 19 and I can say that my parents give me everything that I need, not necessarily everything that I want.

But I still don't think I'm spoiled.

I might legally be an adult, but my parents still provide for me. I may live at school during the semester, but my parents don't charge me rent or utilities when I am at home. My mom still does my laundry. They pay my phone bill monthly. When my mom goes grocery shopping, she doesn't have me chip in to help. She will make sure the bathroom is stocked with tampons or shampoo so I don't have to worry about it. The both of them make sure I have the sufficient needs to not be hungry, cold, or without shelter.

They do all of these things because they want what is best for me.

While they pay my student loans, I give them money to cover it as well as a little extra each month for different expenses. If we go out to eat, I do offer to pay but often get shut down and end up leaving the tip instead. I help around the house and sometimes make trips to the store for food or cleaning supplies, not asking for money to be paid back.

I have a job that gives me decent hours, but my parents understand that money for a college kid is tough.

I pay for my own luxuries such as makeup, cute clothes, even to get my hair cut. Spoiled is typically defined as "damaged by having been given everything they want." Do I want another dog? Yes. Do I have one? No. Do I want a swimming pool in my backyard? Yes. Do I have one? Again, no. That is because both my mother and father still believe in working for what you want and even their daughter doesn't get a free pass unless it's her birthday or Christmas. Do I still have everything I could ever need? Yes.

My parents do the exact same thing for my brother and sister who are older than I am.

I know if I have a problem, whether it be financial or crucial, I can turn to them for help. A lot of people my age don't have parents like I do and I am extremely grateful for them and everything that they do. Thanks, Mom and Dad.

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10 Father's Day Quotes To Share With Your Dad

"Any man can be a father, but it takes someone special to be a dad."
— Anne Geddes
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Fathers are peculiar figures in our lives. They lack the frantic affection of mothers, yet display a certain tenderness of their own toward their children. They've done some crazy stunts of their own, yet fuss over their kids' tiniest mishaps. They're there for the ride of child-rearing no shorter than mothers, and yet their emotional experience isn't exactly the same.

Fathers are our parents, teachers, and providers. It only seems right to take a day out of each year to honor all that they do for us. And so in the spirit of the holiday, I've listed ten Father's Day quotes below for you to share with your own dads.

“The power of a dad in a child’s life is unmatched.” —Justin Ricklefs

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It's true: a father's emotional presence in his relationship with his children can make all the difference in how the child turns out as an adult, for better or worse. A dad receives his parenting "report card," so to say, once the child reaches adulthood and either chooses to continue visiting home or stay away.

However, for a large portion of a child's youth, a dad has most of the power over his relationship with his children. The development of the relationship is entirely dependent on how he chooses to treat his children.

“It is a wise father that knows his own child.” —William Shakespeare

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You can't deny this one, either. Most good fathers know their children better than they know themselves. My own dad frequently knows what I'm feeling before I do. The best fathers are tuned in to their children's emotions, and they certainly try their best to help you when problems arise.

“A father’s smile has been known to light up a child’s entire day.” —Susan Gale

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Remember way back when the most exciting part of your day was when your dad came home from work? It's a magical feeling to reflect on those days and recall that the simplest things our fathers do can bring smiles to our faces. It's healthy to retain a bit of that childlike wonder as an adult, and we can't ever forget that.

“Fathers just have a way of putting everything together.” —Erika Cosby

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Although it may be somewhat begrudgingly, you'll admit that you're almost never disappointed when you seek advice from your dad. Your dad is truly great at piecing together puzzles that you can't solve yourself, and you're grateful for his invaluable input. You wouldn't be where you are now if it weren't for his words.

“A father carries pictures where his money used to be.” —Steve Martin

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For the father who has what it takes to be a dad, children teach him that there's much more to life than money. Matters of the heart exceed the value of money, and wallet photographs most likely serve as a reminder of the children for whom he must provide.

After having kids, a man no longer works for his own livelihood, but for that of his own family. And for this, your father certainly deserves much more recognition than he may receive at times.

“Dad: A son’s first hero, a daughter’s first love.” —Unknown

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From the moment a child sees his or her father for the first time, a heavy responsibility is placed upon his shoulders. A dad must be a role model for how his son is to behave and a standard to which a daughter sets herself to seek out a partner. Hence, a father is a son's first idol and a daughter's first love, as the saying goes.

“A father doesn’t tell you that he loves you. He shows you.” —Dimitri the Stoneheart

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Oftentimes, a father uses his actions rather than his to show you that he loves you. He works to put food on the table because he loves you. He teaches you how to drive because he wants you to stay safe. He shows you how to change a tire so that you aren't stranded anywhere. Everything he does, he does with love.

“My father didn’t do anything unusual. He only did what dads are supposed to do—be there.” —Max Lucado

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And what more can you ask of a good dad?

"I'll never forget how I felt at that moment. I felt that my father was a great man." —Kevin Arnold

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Every child has a moment when he or she realizes that the sacrifices that a father makes are all for their children's benefit. Every child has a moment at which he or she understands that a father is only human, makes mistakes and has more aspirations than meets the eye. It's eye-opening to comprehend that our father is a normal people like you but somehow makes him all the more of an inspiration.

“A dad is someone who wants to catch you when you fall. Instead he picks you up, brushes you off and lets you try again.” —Unknown

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If there's one thing your fathers teaches you, it's perseverance. And you couldn't love him more so for it.

Father's Day is one of our greatest holidays, so this father's day, remember to thank him for all he's done for you.

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