Odyssey Has Become A Major Platform For Female Expression And Empowerment

Odyssey Has Become A Major Platform For Female Expression And Empowerment

The future for women authors can only become brighter.
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Throughout the last couple of years, Odyssey has grown in the number of communities, reaching college students across the country with over 15,000 content creators. Creators are able to express themselves in any way shape or form as long as it's within proper boundaries.

Most importantly, Odyssey has also become a major platform for women authors to have a voice in issues on policy, their pet cat Snuggles, and the importance of empowerment in a generation where social media and marketing have altered the way we see the female body and mind.

In fact, a majority of the creators on Odyssey are indeed college-aged women, each sharing their own experiences of the life and struggles of womanhood.

Some share important bible verses, as Louisiana State Editor Braelyn Legget did in her article Bible Verses To Read When Your Relationship Is Struggling. Others share thank you letters to loved ones. Le Moyne's Meara Mosny published her open letter to her boyfriend almost three years ago and it is one of the most viewed Odyssey publications of all time, peaking close to 2.5 million views.

Some even have a love of sports. West Chester's Courtney Gutkowski has covered college basketball and the NFL, including Loyala-Chicago's (how about those Ramblers!) run to the Final Four. Fordham University's Kelly Bright shined a light on Harvard Women's basketball Team being the FIRST 16th seed to upset an overall 1 seed in 1998, over perennial Pac 12 powerhouse Stanford.

Let's not forget the great women in my community.

Sarah Moyer's article on the importance of Michelle Obama's influence on young girls alike, knowing that they can be, (and continue to be) powerful with the right mindset.

Muhsena Rahman encourages parents alike to raise their daughters as strong Warriors, as she recalls an argument against her aunt about her role as a woman in her family. So, what do all these articles have in common?

Authenticity.

Women on Odyssey have been able to publish countless authentic works that have been viewed by millions of people.

Whether the material is kind, boastful, or straight up badass, Odyssey will continue to grow as the super-platform for women empowerment for years to come...and the future of women authors can only become brighter.

Cover Image Credit: @girlpowermagazine

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To The Nursing Major

Is it all worth it?
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"You're going to feel like quitting. You're going to struggle. You'll have days where you'll wonder, 'what's it all for?'

You'll have days when people attempt to break you down, or challenge your intelligence, skills, and right to be where you are. You'll have moments when you question your own abilities, and perhaps your sanity - but you'll rise.

You'll rise because your strength as a nurse is not determined by one grade, one shift or one job - it's an ongoing journey of learning, honor, humility and a chance to make even the smallest difference in the lives of your patients."

Don't ever give up on achieving your dreams to be a nurse. Keep pushing forward, no matter how hard it is. Nursing is not an easy major. You will have very little, if any, time to do anything other than study. But just think about how great it will feel to connect with a patient, pray with them, and even save his or her life.

This will make all of the late night studying, weekly breakdowns, countless cups of coffee, and tests so hard all you want to do is cry, worth it. To see a patient's face light up when you walk in his or her room will make your heart melt and you'll know you chose the right major.

The kind of nurse you will be isn't based on a test grade, it's based on your heart for the people you are caring for. You may have failed a class, but don't let that ruin you. Try again and keep pushing toward your goal. Don't allow others around you to drag you down and tell you that you aren't good enough to be a nurse.

Show them how strong you are and that you will never give up.

There will be days when all you want to do is quit, I know I question my major more than once a week; however, there is a patient out there that needs you and your caring heart. You can do this, have faith in yourself that you can move mountains.

I will say that you definitely must have a heart for nursing.

Personally, I want to be a Pediatric Oncologist and work at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Just the thought of those precious children going through the hardest part of their lives, keeps me going so that I can be there for them. I want to be a light to my patients and their families during a dark time. When I feel like giving up, I just think about how many lives I have the chance to touch and I keep on going.

So when you feel like giving up, just think about your future patients and how you can make a difference, even if its only for one person. I love the quote from Katie Davis that states, "I will not change the world, Jesus will do that. But I can change the world for one person. So I will keep loving, one person at a time."

Even though this quote is about foreign missions, I believe it fits the mold for nursing as well.

Nurses have the opportunity to change the world for people every day. Just remember that, smile, don't give up, and keep pushing toward your goal.

Cover Image Credit: chla.org

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Labor Unions Are Integral To Our Country, And They Need Our Help

Organized labor has been a staple of this country for generations, and its' decline is forever associated with various declines in our standard of living.

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USW, UAW, Teamsters, AFSCME. Those may just sound like odd names to many, but to me and many American workers, they are the myriad labor unions that have been integral to our country and its' blue-collar population. They have helped in many ways to defend workers, give them good benefits plans, and to protect their salary and ability to work from corporations.

Now? They have been in decline for decades, and sit at just 10.7% of all workers according to U.S. government estimates. This is a remarkably low number for the United States' workforce and is also another sad part of the economic stagnation of the U.S. since union membership began to collapse.

It might seem a bit odd to believe that unions and income inequality would be linked: you would expect that, maybe as a gesture of goodwill, corporation executives might offer better benefits to retain talent.

This could not be further from the truth. Studies have indicated that unions have a positive effect from members to nonmembers.

In a study conducted measuring average household income from 1973-2015, researchers found that there was a robust correlation between income inequality and union decline. In fact, the study found that the wages of nonunion workers would have been 3-7% higher if union membership rates were noticeably higher.

This dramatic increase in income inequality can be attributed to multiple factors: increasing automation, workers being reduced to performing increasingly less-intricate tasks, outsourcing, college-degree preference and so on. However, as time has gone on and research has been conducted, unions have been shown to benefit society and counter income inequality via actions such as fighting for broader access to healthcare, which has been a key facet of income inequality.

Though unions are far weaker now than they have been historically, we have still seen their power: In Los Angeles, unions were able to help negotiate better pay and funding for school teachers. In West Virginia, unions were center-stage as the many teachers who wanted more money were granted by the governor.

As one can see, unions still have a part to play in our country and its' economy.

Unions remain integral to how we function. Without unions, many of the benefits, payment plans, and healthcare options would not exist. And that is why I am partial to unions: unions allowed for socioeconomic ascendancy, a better life for families, and a chance to live a good life despite not having the luxury of a college degree.

In a time where the world is saturated with degrees and not enough trade school workers, unions might just become essential yet again. I, for one, would welcome that. As a kid from Ohio, union workers are prevalent, and protecting them now and later is integral.

Support your local to rebuild the American dream.

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