A New Page

A New Page

Doing library work like you read about
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So recently I got myself a job. Part-time, minimum wage, but a job nonetheless, and one that I’m pretty happy about. Assuming that you’ve read the headline for this article, (and if not then how did you miss it?!) then by now you know that I’m officially going to be beginning work as a page. I realized that some people might not know exactly what that entails though, and so I’m here to inform those people.

When you imagine entry-level library work, you probably imagine someone stocking shelves and making sure that the library books are in the right order. This is partially correct, but there’s actually much more to the position than that. Starting out, there's a two month training period, during which time the trainee learns the layout of the library and the duties that they are expected to perform within it. These include, but are not limited to, greeting and guiding visitors, delivering packages around the building and retrieving books from employees-only storage, and making copies of important documents for the various departments that work within the library space.



Training is meant to be gradual, but it is expected that once the training period is over, the page will be able to work almost entirely independently each day. Once the page has been independent for some time, they may apply for an open senior page position, which comes with higher pay, but with more responsibilities, like assisting new pages with their training. Because many employees come in and out of jobs in the library, there are often openings, but space is still limited; for every 25 or so pages, there are only 8 pages at the most. That makes 35 pages in a book, for anyone keeping track.

Of course, in addition to work requirements, the position does come with perks. Besides having easier access to books, the page can apply for a week long grace period, meaning that they can take out books for longer than the average library-goer. Some people might find this to be a rather minor benefit, but I prefer to avoid those people whenever possible.



Where will this new position take me? No idea, but I'm excited to start. You could say that I'm in my element, at the library.

Cover Image Credit: Bookicious

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To The Parent Who Chose Addiction

Thank you for giving me a stronger bond with our family.

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When I was younger I resented you, I hated every ounce of you, and I used to question why God would give me a parent like you. Not now. Now I see the beauty and the blessings behind having an addict for a parent. If you're reading this, it isn't meant to hurt you, but rather to thank you.

Thank you for choosing your addiction over me.

Throughout my life, you have always chosen the addiction over my programs, my swim meets or even a simple movie night. You joke about it now or act as if I never questioned if you would wake up the next morning from your pill and alcohol-induced sleep, but I thank you for this. I thank you because I gained a relationship with God. The amount of time I spent praying for you strengthened our relationship in ways I could never explain.

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Thank you for giving me a stronger bond with our family.

The amount of hurt and disappointment our family has gone through has brought us closer together. I have a relationship with Nanny and Pop that would never be as strong as it is today if you had been in the picture from day one. That in itself is a blessing.

Thank you for showing me how to love.

From your absence, I have learned how to love unconditionally. I want you to know that even though you weren't here, I love you most of all. No matter the amount of heartbreak, tears, and pain I've felt, you will always be my greatest love.

Thank you for making me strong.

Thank you for leaving and for showing me how to be independent. From you, I have learned that I do not need anyone else to prove to me that I am worthy of being loved. From you, I have learned that life is always hard, but you shouldn't give into the things that make you feel good for a short while, but should search for the real happiness in life.

Most of all, thank you for showing me how to turn my hurt into motivation.

I have learned that the cycle of addiction is not something that will continue into my life. You have hurt me more than anyone, but through that hurt, I have pushed myself to become the best version of myself.

Thank you for choosing the addiction over me because you've made me stronger, wiser, and loving than I ever could've been before.

Cover Image Credit: http://crashingintolove.tumblr.com/post/62246881826/pieffysessanta-tumblr-com

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To The People Who Don't Respond To Messages In A Timely Fashion...

It's not a personality trait - it's just rude.

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I get it. People are busy, and we shouldn't constantly be on our phones all the time, or else we will inevitably miss the things that are going on all around us. But, it is ignorant to not admit that, even though everyone has many responsibilities and things to get done everyday, we are all very much connected. Social media, text messages, phone calls, emails, and more - we have virtually our entire worlds at our fingertips at any minute of the day.

That is, if the people we reach out to actually bother to respond. My greatest pet peeve is when people let their messages build up to the point where they are days late in their response. Or, even worse, just never bother to respond. No one is that busy, especially if you are still maintaining your Snapchat streaks and liking my Instagram pictures, all while my text from a day and a half ago remains unread.

I am not even asking for a long, well thought out response, either. While that is always very much appreciated, acknowledging the fact that I sent you something, even if it is just to say you are busy and will look into whatever it is later, that is far better than leaving me hanging. If you have time to scroll mindlessly through twitter, you have time to respond to your unanswered emails, phone calls, and texts. Don't tell me you are bad at responding in a timely manner - you choose to not respond, you choose to push it off to read later, and therefore, whether intentionally or not, choose to be rude.

So, to the people who have let their unread messages notification reach a number higher than 10, my message, if you choose to read it, is simple: respond. No response at this point is too late, and if it is, apologize if you actually mean it. This isn't a hard thing to do, and it really does make a difference. The occasional late response with a legit excuse is acceptable, but to be consistently late is to consistently put yourself before anyone else's needs. Everyone has stuff going on, being "busy" and having a long to-do list is not unique to you. But someone actually took time out of their day, their busy schedule, to send you a message. Do them the courtesy of responding in a timely manner, if you want that same sort of respect in return.

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