A New Page

A New Page

Doing library work like you read about
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So recently I got myself a job. Part-time, minimum wage, but a job nonetheless, and one that I’m pretty happy about. Assuming that you’ve read the headline for this article, (and if not then how did you miss it?!) then by now you know that I’m officially going to be beginning work as a page. I realized that some people might not know exactly what that entails though, and so I’m here to inform those people.

When you imagine entry-level library work, you probably imagine someone stocking shelves and making sure that the library books are in the right order. This is partially correct, but there’s actually much more to the position than that. Starting out, there's a two month training period, during which time the trainee learns the layout of the library and the duties that they are expected to perform within it. These include, but are not limited to, greeting and guiding visitors, delivering packages around the building and retrieving books from employees-only storage, and making copies of important documents for the various departments that work within the library space.



Training is meant to be gradual, but it is expected that once the training period is over, the page will be able to work almost entirely independently each day. Once the page has been independent for some time, they may apply for an open senior page position, which comes with higher pay, but with more responsibilities, like assisting new pages with their training. Because many employees come in and out of jobs in the library, there are often openings, but space is still limited; for every 25 or so pages, there are only 8 pages at the most. That makes 35 pages in a book, for anyone keeping track.

Of course, in addition to work requirements, the position does come with perks. Besides having easier access to books, the page can apply for a week long grace period, meaning that they can take out books for longer than the average library-goer. Some people might find this to be a rather minor benefit, but I prefer to avoid those people whenever possible.



Where will this new position take me? No idea, but I'm excited to start. You could say that I'm in my element, at the library.

Cover Image Credit: Bookicious

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10 Things Someone Who Grew Up In A Private School Knows

The 10 things that every private school-goer knows all too well.

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1. Uniforms

Plaid. The one thing that every private school-goer knows all too well. It was made into jumpers, skirts, shorts, scouts, hair ties, basically anything you could imagine, the school plaid was made into. You had many different options on what to wear on a normal day, but you always dreaded dress uniform day because of skirts and ballet flats. But it made waking up late for school a whole lot easier.

2. New people were a big deal

New people weren't a big thing. Maybe one or two a year to a grade, but after freshman year no one new really showed up, making the new kid a big deal.

3. You've been to school with most of your class since Kindergarten


Most of your graduating class has been together since Kindergarten, maybe even preschool, if your school has it. They've become part of your family, and you can honestly say you've grown up with your best friends.

4. You've had the same teachers over and over

Having the same teacher two or three years in a row isn't a real surprise. They know what you are capable of and push you to do your best.

5. Everyone knows everybody. Especially everyone's business.

Your graduating class doesn't exceed 150. You know everyone in your grade and most likely everyone in the high school. Because of this, gossip spreads like wildfire. So everyone knows what's going on 10 minutes after it happens.

6. Your hair color was a big deal

If it's not a natural hair color, then forget about it. No dyeing your hair hot pink or blue or you could expect a phone call to your parents saying you have to get rid of it ASAP.

7. Your school isn't like "Gossip Girl"

There is no eating off campus for lunch or casually using your cell phone in class. Teachers are more strict and you can't skip class or just walk right off of campus.

8. Sports are a big deal

Your school is the best of the best at most sports. The teams normally go to the state championships. The rest of the school that doesn't play sports attends the games to cheer on the teams.

9. Boys had to be clean-shaven, and hair had to be cut

If you came to school and your hair was not cut or your beard was not shaved, you were written up and made to go in the bathroom and shave or have the head of discipline cut your hair. Basically, if you know you're getting written up for hair, it's best just to check out and go get a hair cut.

10. Free dress days were like a fashion show

Wearing a school uniform every day can really drive you mad. That free dress day once a month is what you lived for. It was basically a fashion show for everyone, except for those upperclassmen who were over everything and just wore sweat pants.

Cover Image Credit: Authors Photos

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The Secret to Life is Putting Yourself First

Sounds selfish. But is it?

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Society puts unrealistic expectations on us to put everyone before ourselves. We see it everywhere... Donate money. Help a friend in need. The list goes on and on. I am not saying not to help other people - quite the opposite. I am saying that if you neglect to help yourself first, you are not any help to others. Let me explain...

There is a fun saying recited before a plane takes off. When demonstrating how to put on your air mask if something should happen to the plane, the flight attendant makes it clear that you have to put on your own mask first before helping others to put on their's. Otherwise you won't be able to breathe when you're trying to save everyone else, and consequently, won't be much help to those people.

Life is the same way. If you don't put your own happiness before trying to make everyone else happy, you will "run out of air" aka fail to make yourself happy. In a way, putting yourself first is much more altruistic because you are more suited to help others.

For most of my life, I was under the impression that I needed to put everyone before myself. This mentality turned me into a people-pleasing person who neglected my own happiness. I felt like I was a bad person if I wanted to do something for myself before helping someone else. After one too many times feeling resentful and taken advantage, I realized that many of my problems stemmed from not putting on my air mask first.

Your world changes when you put yourself first. I am happier, less resentful, and actually MORE giving. I am helping other people because I actually want to and not because I feel like it is what I am supposed to do. I have taken care of myself, and I am not giving more than I have to give. Further, I have already made myself happy, and I don't need to live vicariously through making others happy. I learned that if I didn't put myself first, no one else would.

This mentality taught me the key difference in being nice and being kind. I strive for being kind. Kindness is being a genuine, good person. Kindness is not just giving to others, it's giving to yourself as well. Niceness is kissing up to people and letting others walk all over you. It is caring about what others think about you. It is advertising your good deeds. It is doing things because you think others will think better of you. Being nice is not doing kind acts for the sake of being a good person. I was nice for most of my life. I now aim for kindness. I am focused on giving to others, but not at the expense of my own happiness. I am not focused on impressing everyone else.

Since I have changed my mentality, there have been times that I have felt guilty not being able to drop everything to help someone last minute. Maybe it would feel nice to completely change my day around every time someone suddenly needs me, but I need "me" too. There are still times that I change my day around to accommodate others (and gladly do it), but I have made it happen less often. I no longer feel like other people are taking advantage of me because I am only giving what I am actually capable of giving. What I am capable of giving to others is what I have left over after I have helped myself. Otherwise, who is there to help me?

I guess this mentality breeds not caring what others think as well. I learned that if I made myself happy, then I am excited to give back. I learned not to care if everything I do fails to please everyone. Focusing on pleasing everyone really does please anyone.

I am not saying to be a self-centered, horrible person, but if you are a little selfish, you will actually be much more altruistic and kind. You will be a better person.

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