PSA to all New Englanders:

We get snow in the winter. It is inevitable. Whether it be a dusting or a blizzard, the ground will be coated in white before you know it.

Many people, when winter comes back around, (or when October comes around, you really never know in these parts), tend to get nervous when its time to drive.

Having lived here my whole life, it seems as though many people forget how to drive once even a hint of snow hits the skies, and year after year, it becomes kind of a nuisance. So, in the spirit of that, here are some tips for driving in the incredibly unpredictable snow of New England.

1) DRIVE SLOWLY. The roads become slippery very quickly, and it can be easy to lose control of your car. Take it slow and if you have to be somewhere, leave with plenty of time to drive in a safe manner.

2) PUT ON YOUR HEADLIGHTS. Snow makes driving difficult. It makes it much harder to see, and when you don't have your headlights on, it's damn near impossible to see a car coming down the road. So, in the interest of safety for not only you and your passengers, but also everyone else driving on the road, flick those headlights into the on position and then continue on your way.


3) HAVE A SNOW BRUSH IN YOUR CAR. In case you forgot when you read it earlier, New England is hella unpredictable and you could go into the grocery store and come back to snow on your car with absolutely no warning. So, unless you like using your sleeve, I would recommend keeping a snow brush in the trunk. But really, who likes a cold damp sleeve?


4) TURN THE STEERING WHEEL WITH THE SLIDE. Should you have the unfortunate luck of sliding around in the snow, (not fishtailing in an empty parking lot for fun), it is important to keep the steering wheel in the direction you're going in. It won't solve the problem completely, but it will definitely be helpful.


5) PUMP THE BRAKES. If you begin sliding forwards, don't slam the brake down into the ground. Pump the brakes and they will work much, much better.


6) SHOVELS ARE NEVER A BAD THING. If you know you're traveling through a snow storm, it's not a bad idea to put a shovel in the trunk, right next to your snow brush. That way you're prepared if you get stuck, and don't have to use your hands to dig yourself out.

7) BRUSH YOUR CAR OFF. COMPLETELY. Don't be that guy. Don't be the person driving down the road with a foot of snow on the roof of your car, because nobody wants to be the one on the receiving end of that snow. It's very dangerous, and can also cause obstructed views for you to drive.


8) TAKE TURNS SLOWLY. Odds are, there are random piles of snow everywhere when you go to take those turns, because plows always leave them. Therefore, you should not be whippin your ride around these corners, unless you for some reason want to slide all over the road and cause potential harm.


9) CAR STARTERS ARE AMAZING. It takes an absurd amount of time for a car to heat up in freezing cold weather, and if you have a car starter then you can cut down that time by clicking a button from the comfort of your warm home while still getting ready. If you don't have one, you should probably bundle up and start your car 15 minutes before you leave.


10) SEAT WARMERS ARE ALSO INCREDIBLE. When you take a car and below freezing temperatures, when you get into said car to drive, your seat is inevitably going to be cold. That's why seat warmers were invented. They are a blessing, and if you don't have them, I'm sorry. My solution for you is to put a blanket on your seats, especially if they are leather, because even that small layer in between yourself and your seat can make a difference!


11) MAYBE...JUST CANCEL YOUR PLANS. My final piece of advice for you is if the weather is too bad, cancel your plans to go out and stay home. Watch movies, drink hot chocolate, build a snowman -- whatever you do will be better than sliding all over the road and driving unsafely. New England is unpredictable, especially when it comes to snow and who is driving in it.


So, please take this advice, and drive safely for the remainder of this winter, (or spring, whenever New England decides to stop its crazy weather patterns). Don't drive too quickly, and be careful out there!