5 Conspiracy Theories That Are Sure To Keep You Up At Night

5 Conspiracy Theories That Are Sure To Keep You Up At Night

Government officials and other powerful people (aka the Illuminati) are working together to brainwash the masses in order to create a "New World Order."

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I've always been a conspiracy theorist. As a natural-born cynic, questioning people, institutions, and most especially the government, is second nature to me. I remember years ago, when I was in like, middle school, I would research new theories online and spend hours looking at videos, articles, etc. that aimed to explain the mysteries and injustices filtered throughout the world (I believe Bush did 9/11 before it became a meme).

Alas, my interest since then has not faltered, and with Youtubers like Shane Dawson and Michelle Platti cranking out new videos dedicated to conspiracy theories, I might have become an even greater theorist. But now it's cool to do. So at least if I seem crazy to the rest of the world, I have a group of people behind me ready to look crazy too. Interested to see what new theories people have come up with? Check them out below.

1. Our brains are being programmed by social media

This theory is an extension of one of the most popular theories in the world, which is that government officials and other powerful people (aka the Illuminati) are working together to brainwash the masses in order to create a "New World Order" (sounds creepy, right?). This theory gained steam after Facebook's "secret mood experiment," which was an experiment conducted by the site that screened users' news feed in order to manipulate their emotions. Results showed that people exposed to positive images were more likely to post happier statuses, while it was the opposite for users only shown negative or sad images.

If Facebook is already manipulating users' emotions, what else are these megacorporations doing without our knowledge? Some people believe social media is being used to sway political and social opinions, which will be the catalyst for the U.S. beginning to operate under martial law (more mass outrage/protests = more police force).

Dismal, I know.

2. The government is creating a new disease, and they killed a CDC scientist to cover it up

Timothy Cunningham was an accomplished CDC scientist that helped with outbreaks such as Zika and Ebola. He was so accomplished that he even received the "40 under 40" award for his professional work. In February, Cunningham went missing, leaving behind his personal belongings such as his car, dog, and cellphone. That wasn't even the most suspicious part. After leaving work early because he felt sick, Cunningham called his mother and sister, then told his neighbor to delete his number from her phone.

Two months later, he was found dead in the Atlanta river.

This, of course, caused the conspiracy theory community to light up with dozens of explanations for his bizarre disappearance. Some believe that he may have been a victim of organ harvesting, a problem they say is especially prominent within the Black community (this is a serious rabbit hole... if you want to get deeply invested into a theory, check this one out). But the most popular theory was that Cunningham was prepositioned by the CDC to work on engineering a new, highly contagious and lethal disease they would release to the public to aid in population control. After not complying (remember, Cunningham was deeply devoted to his work and helping others), he fled, but was captured and killed by the government.

Whew, that one is a doozy (but also pretty damn convincing).

3. Racial tension has been influenced by the government to start a "race war"

This theory is probably just a way for people to cope with the harsh realization that our society is pretty darn racist, but I have to admit, it definitely could be true. I know that for someone like me (who is obsessed with race theory and eliminating White supremacy), it's a little hard to believe that I could entertain this idea, but look at the evidence first. Conspiracy theorists believe that some recent events have been too close in proximity to one another or too blatantly racist to actually be realistically perpetrated.

For instance, the Trump presidency. While always an outspoken man, Trump was never outright racist or xenophobic (he was always a sexist dick, however) until he ran for president. It's something theorists believe was orchestrated by the Illuminati (or Free Masons or lizard people. It really depends on what theory you subscribe to).

Another example is the back-to-back incidents involving Black people being either a) removed from public places (or not being able to use the restroom, like in the Starbucks incident) or b) having the cops called on them for arbitrary reasons (like in Oakland, where a White woman called on a group of Black people for LEGALLY barbecuing in the park). As isolated incidents, these all sound highly plausible and expectable from American society, but when viewed as a series of events set in motion since 2016 (right around the time of the presidential election), things start to get a little suspicious.

I mean, ask yourself: Why are all of these incidents happening now? Smartphones, recording devices, and social media have been around for many years now, so we can't use the excuse of technology allowing us to finally share these injustices widely. Conspiracy theorists believe that the government wants to raise tension between racial groups in order to divide the American people and make us easier to control, as we will be too preoccupied with hating each other to question what the government is doing (and then they can ship us off to FEMA camps without any issues).

Just food for thought.

4. People will be assigned a "social" score in order to quell resistance from the government

This theory was brought to my attention by YouTuber Moe Othman, a self-proclaimed "insider" with special knowledge of government affairs. I highly recommend going to watch his YouTube video, where this theory is addressed more in-depth. The theory pretty much suggests that in the coming years, the government will begin a new program where they assign "social scores" to citizens. Social scores are sort of like social security numbers. They are unique to each person and are a way of identifying them or obtaining information about them. With social scores, the government would deduct or add points based on behavior. For example, if a person were to commit a crime, their social score would decrease (points deducted).

Theorists believe this social score system could then be used to silence the masses and bring about an age of censorship. The government would have the power to deduct points from citizens who question, challenge, or offend the government. The catch to this is that the score would not just be a way of judging people's moral character, but it would stop people from being able to buy and sell goods, real estate, or even apply for licenses. The government would essentially punish people to death (how can you live if you can't even buy food or rent an apartment?) just for using their first amendment right... Yikes.

5. The year isn't 2018. It's actually 1721

Okay, this conspiracy theory actually isn't new. It started popping up circa 2009. But I just love it so much that I had to mention it. According to the Phantom Time Hypothesis, a portion of the Middle Ages never existed; instead, they were faked by "Pope Sylvester II, Holy Roman Emperor Otto III, and Byzantine Emperor Constantine VII [who] got together and changed the calendar to make it seem as if Otto had begun his reign in the millennial year of 1000 AD, rather than 996" (allthatsinteresting.com). Due to their initial tampering, they ended up forging 297 years of history that didn't actually happen.

This sounds crazy, but German theorist Heribert Illig actually claims to have archaeological proof. Not only that, but if it actually is 1721, that would explain why the 2012 doomsday apocalypse didn't happen, and why the Yellowstone super-volcano eruption hasn't happened yet (super-volcanos erupt on a 600,000-year cycle. It has now been 640,000 years since the last one).

Who knows? Maybe conspiracy theorists had it right with Y2K as well. They were just 279 years early.

Regardless of whether these theories are true or not, we can all agree that they're interesting to read about. Don't get too terrified behind these ideas, though. Remember, conspiracy theorists are also the same group of people that claim the Earth is flat.

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I'm The Girl Who'd Rather Raise A Family Than A Feminist Protest Sign

You raise your protest picket signs and I’ll raise my white picket fence.
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Social Media feeds are constantly filled with quotes on women's rights, protests with mobs of women, and an array of cleverly worded picket signs.

Good for them, standing up for their beliefs and opinions. Will I be joining my tight-knit family of the same gender?

Nope, no thank you.

Don't get me wrong, I am not going to be oblivious to my history and the advancements that women have fought to achieve. I am aware that the strides made by many women before me have provided us with voting rights, a voice, equality, and equal pay in the workforce.

SEE ALSO: To The Girl Who Would Rather Raise A Family Than A Feminist Protest Sign

For that, I am deeply thankful. But at this day in age, I know more female managers in the workforce than male. I know more women in business than men. I know more female students in STEM programs than male students. So what’s with all the hype? We are girl bosses, we can run the world, we don’t need to fight the system anymore.

Please stop.

Because it is insulting to the rest of us girls who are okay with being homemakers, wives, or stay-at-home moms. It's dividing our sisterhood, and it needs to stop.

All these protests and strong statements make us feel like now we HAVE to obtain a power position in our career. It's our rightful duty to our sisters. And if we do not, we are a disappointment to the gender and it makes us look weak.

Weak to the point where I feel ashamed to say to a friend “I want to be a stay at home mom someday.” Then have them look at me like I must have been brain-washed by a man because that can be the only explanation. I'm tired of feeling belittled for being a traditionalist.

Why?

Because why should I feel bad for wanting to create a comfortable home for my future family, cooking for my husband, being a soccer mom, keeping my house tidy? Because honestly, I cannot wait.

I will have no problem taking my future husband’s last name, and following his lead.

The Bible appoints men to be the head of a family, and for wives to submit to their husbands. (This can be interpreted in so many ways, so don't get your panties in a bunch at the word “submit”). God specifically made women to be gentle and caring, and we should not be afraid to embrace that. God created men to be leaders with the strength to carry the weight of a family.

However, in no way does this mean that the roles cannot be flipped. If you want to take on the responsibility, by all means, you go girl. But for me personally? I'm sensitive, I cry during horror movies, I'm afraid of basements and dark rooms. I, in no way, am strong enough to take on the tasks that men have been appointed to. And I'm okay with that.

So please, let me look forward to baking cookies for bake sales and driving a mom car.

And I'll support you in your endeavors and climb to the top of the corporate ladder. It doesn't matter what side you are on as long as we support each other, because we all need some girl power.

Cover Image Credit: Unsplash

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Abortion Bans Are Only A Small Part Of The Republican War On Women

These bans expose the Republican Party for what it truly is.

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This week, several states passed laws that ban abortion after six to eight weeks of pregnancy, before most women even know that they're pregnant. The most egregious of these is Alabama — the state has banned abortion except for in cases of danger to the mother. Exceptions in the cases of rape and incest were actively voted against by the state legislature. Under the new law, any doctor who is caught giving an abortion would be sentenced to 99 years in prison, and the woman would be charged with murder.

Apart from the fact that this explicitly violates the decision of Roe v. Wade (which is the point), this is only a small part of the slow but steady degradation of women's rights by Republicans in the United States. To anyone who believes that this is simply about people being "pro-life" or "saving the children," then tell them to look at what happens after the fetus is carried to term.

Republicans oppose forcing fathers to be involved in the lives of their children that were forcibly carried to term, desires to cut food stamps and make it more difficult to feed said child, cut funding for affordable housing to make it more difficult for them to find homes, cut spending to public education so these children can't move up the social ladder, and refuse to offer the woman or her child health insurance to keep them both healthy. What about efforts to prevent pregnancy? Republicans also oppose funding birth control and contraception, as well as opposing comprehensive sexual education. To them, the only feasible solution is to simply keep your legs shut. They oppose all of these things because it is, in their eyes, a violation of individual rights to force people to do something. The bill also makes women who get abortions felons, and felons can't vote. I'll let you finish putting those two together.

If you view it from this framework, it would seem like Republicans are being extremely hypocritical by violating the personal freedoms of pregnant women, but if you look at it from the view of restricting social mobility for women, then it makes perfect sense. The Republican dogma of "individual rights" and "personal responsibility" is a socially acceptable facade that they use to cover up their true intentions of protecting the status quo and protect those in power. About any Republican policy, ask yourself: does this disperse power or consolidate it? Whether it be education, healthcare, the environment, or the economy, Republicans love to keep power away from the average citizen and give it to the small number of people that they deem "deserving" of it because of their race, gender, wealth, or power. This is the case with abortion as well; Power is being taken from women, and being given back to men in a reversal of the Feminist Movement of the 1970s.

Republicans don't believe in systemic issues. They believe that everyone has the same opportunity to succeed regardless of what point they started. This is why they love capitalism so much. It acts as some sort of great filter in which only those who deserve power can make it to the top. It's also why they hate social policies; they think that helping people who can't help themselves changes the hierarchy in a negative way by giving people who don't "deserve" power, power. Of course, we know that just because you have money and power doesn't mean you earned it fair and square, and even if Republicans believe it, it wouldn't change anything because it wouldn't change how they want to distribute power.

In short, Republican policies, including abortion, leave the average American with less money, less protection, less education, worse health, less opportunity, fewer rights, and less freedom. This is NOT a side effect. This is the point. Regardless of what Republicans will tell you about "inalienable rights" and how everyone is equal, in reality, they believe that some people and groups are more deserving of rights than others, and the group that deserves rights the most are the ones "that will do the best with them." To Republicans, this group consists of the wealthy, the powerful, and the white — the mega-rich, the CEOs of large companies, gun owners and Christians.

So, who do Republicans think deserve power and give it to? People who look and think like them. This, however, begs the question: Who do they want to take it from?

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