6 Captivating Landscape Photos — National Geographic 2016 Winners

6 Captivating Landscape Photos — National Geographic 2016 Winners

These stunning landscape photos will catch you off-guard as the imagery drags you into the lens.
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2016 has been a series of snapshots, from celeb deaths to the presidential elections, but the most stunning, picturesque photographs that have gained attention are the winners of the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest.

1. Winter Horseman

"The winter in Inner Mongolia is very unforgiving. At a freezing temperature of minus 20 and lower, with a constant breeze of snow from all directions, it was pretty hard to convince myself to get out of the car and take photos. I saw horsemen showing off their skills and commanding the steed from a distance. I quickly grabbed my telephoto lens and captured the moment when one of the horsemen charged out from the morning mist." Anthony Lau

2. Remote Life

"An old woman in a remote village in Himachal Pradesh, India, carries a big log back home to warm up her house." Mattia Passarini

3. Sardine Run

"I captured this image during the migration of the sardines along the wild coast of South Africa. Natural predation, sardines are preyed upon by cape gannet birds and common dolphins. The hunt begins with common dolphins that have developed special hunting techniques. With remarkable eyesight, the gannets follow the dolphins before diving in a free fall from 30 to 40 meters high, piercing the surface of the water head first at a speed of 80km/h to get their fill of sardines." G. Lecoeur

4. Above the Zambezi

"Traversing the skies above the iconic Victoria Falls, known locally as Mosi-Oa-Tunya or “the smoke that thunders." Phillip Nix

5. Ben Youssef

"Marrakesh, Morocco, is an exciting city for any traveler, but I was tired of walking on the crowded street and being asked for money from local people, so I was looking for a place to settle down. Even though there were a lot of people in Ben Youssef Madrasa, it was still a more quiet and relaxing place than outside. Suddenly a beautiful reflection appeared on the shallow pool when I was taking a rest." Takashi Nakagawa

6. Mt. Bromo Sunrise Eruption

"It's like watching the earth being born. A four hour bumpy jeep ride in the middle of the night got me to the freezing cold view point of Mt. Bromo, Indonesia. After a couple more hours wait in the dark I was greeted with not only a rare opportunity to see this special place erupting, but also a wonderful sunrise casting it's orange glow on the ash. Note the small square temple between the cones. This image was made from a seven shot bracket, taken immediately one after the other." Ronald Nelson


Cover Image Credit: Phillip Nix

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Your Wait time At Theme Parks Is Not Unfair, You're Just Impatient

Your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself.

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Toy Story Land at Disney's Hollywood Studios "unboxed" on June 30, 2018. My friend and I decided to brave the crowds on opening day. We got to the park around 7 AM only to find out that the park opened around 6 AM. Upon some more scrolling through multiple Disney Annual Passholder Facebook groups, we discovered that people were waiting outside the park as early as 1 AM.

We knew we'd be waiting in line for the bulk of the Toy Story Land unboxing day. There were four main lines in the new land: the line to enter the land; the line for Slinky Dog Dash, the new roller coaster; the line for Alien Spinning Saucers, the easier of the new rides in the land; Toy Story Mania, the (now old news) arcade-type ride; and the new quick-service restaurant, Woody's Lunchbox (complete with grilled cheese and "grown-up drinks").

Because we were so early, we did not have to wait in line to get into the land. We decided to ride Alien Spinning Saucers first. The posted wait time was 150 minutes, but my friend timed the line and we only waited for 50 minutes. Next, we tried to find the line for Slinky Dog Dash. After receiving conflicting answers, the runaround, and even an, "I don't know, good luck," from multiple Cast Members, we exited the land to find the beginning of the Slinky line. We were then told that there was only one line to enter the park that eventually broke off into the Slinky line. We were not about to wait to get back into the area we just left, so we got a Fastpass for Toy Story Mania that we didn't plan on using in order to be let into the land sooner. We still had to wait for our time, so we decided to get the exclusive Little Green Man alien popcorn bin—this took an entire hour. We then used our Fastpass to enter the land, found the Slinky line, and proceeded to wait for two and a half hours only for the ride to shut down due to rain. But we've come this far and rain was not about to stop us. We waited an hour, still in line and under a covered area, for the rain to stop. Then, we waited another hour and a half to get on the ride from there once it reopened (mainly because they prioritized people who missed their Fastpass time due to the rain). After that, we used the mobile order feature on the My Disney Experience app to skip part of the line at Woody's Lunchbox.

Did you know that there is actually a psychological science to waiting? In the hospitality industry, this science is the difference between "perceived wait" and "actual wait." A perceived wait is how long you feel like you are waiting, while the actual wait is, of course, the real and factual time you wait. There are eight things that affect the perceived wait time: unoccupied time feels longer than occupied time, pre-process waits feel longer than in-process waits, anxiety makes waits feel longer, uncertain waits are longer than certain waits, unexplained waits are longer than explained waits, unfair waits are longer than equitable waits, people will wait longer for more valuable service and solo waiting feels longer than group waiting.

Our perceived wait time for Alien Spinning Saucers was short because we expected it to be longer. Our wait for the popcorn seemed longer because it was unoccupied and unexplained. Our wait for the rain to stop so the ride could reopen seemed shorter because it was explained. Our wait between the ride reopening and getting on the coaster seemed longer because it felt unfair for Disney to let so many Fastpass holders through while more people waited through the rain. Our entire wait for Slinky Dog Dash seemed longer because we were not told the wait time in the beginning. Our wait for our food after placing a mobile order seemed shorter because it was an in-process wait. We also didn't mind wait long wait times for any of these experiences because they were new and we placed more value on them than other rides or restaurants at Disney. The people who arrived at 1 AM just added five hours to their perceived wait

Some non-theme park examples of this science of waiting in the hospitality industry would be waiting at a restaurant, movie theater, hotel, performance or even grocery store. When I went to see "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom," the power went out in the theater right as we arrived. Not only did we have to wait for it to come back and for them to reset the projectors, I had to wait in a bit of anxiety because the power outage spooked me. It was only a 30-minute wait but felt so much longer. At the quick-service restaurant where I work, we track the time from when the guest places their order to the time they receive their food. Guests in the drive-thru will complain about 10 or more minute waits, when our screens tell us they have only been waiting four or five minutes. Their actual wait was the four or five minutes that we track because this is when they first request our service, but their perceived wait begins the moment they pull into the parking lot and join the line because this is when they begin interacting with our business. While in line, they are experiencing pre-process wait times; after placing the order, they experience in-process wait times.

Establishments in the hospitality industry do what they can to cut down on guests' wait times. For example, theme parks offer services like Disney's Fastpass or Universal's Express pass in order to cut down the time waiting in lines so guests have more time to buy food and merchandise. Stores like Target or Wal-Mart offer self-checkout to give guests that in-process wait time. Movie theaters allow you to check in and get tickets on a mobile app and some quick-service restaurants let you place mobile or online orders. So why do people still get so bent out of shape about being forced to wait?

On Toy Story Land unboxing day, I witnessed a woman make a small scene about being forced to wait to exit the new land. Cast Members were regulating the flow of traffic in and out of the land due to the large crowd and the line that was in place to enter the land. Those exiting the land needed to wait while those entering moved forward from the line. Looking from the outside of the situation as I was, this all makes sense. However, the woman I saw may have felt that her wait was unfair or unexplained. She switched between her hands on her hips and her arms crossed, communicated with her body language that she was not happy. Her face was in a nasty scowl at those entering the land and the Cast Members in the area. She kept shaking her head at those in her group and when allowed to proceed out of the land, I could tell she was making snide comments about the wait.

At work, we sometimes run a double drive-thru in which team members with iPads will take orders outside and a sequencer will direct cars so that they stay in the correct order moving toward the window. In my experience as the sequencer, I will inform the drivers which car to follow, they will acknowledge me and then still proceed to dart in front of other cars just so they make it to the window maybe a whole minute sooner. Not only is this rude, but it puts this car and the cars around them at risk of receiving the wrong food because they are now out of order. We catch these instances more often than not, but it still adds stress and makes the other guests upset. Perhaps these guests feel like their wait is also unfair or unexplained, but if they look at the situation from the outside or from the restaurant's perspective, they would understand why they need to follow the blue Toyota.

The truth of the matter is that your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself. We all want instant gratification, I get it. But in reality, we have to wait for some things. It takes time to prepare a meal. It takes time to experience a ride at a theme park that everyone else wants to go on. It takes time to ring up groceries. It takes patience to live in this world.

So next time you find yourself waiting, take a minute to remember the difference between perceived and actual wait times. Think about the eight aspects of waiting that affect your perceived wait. Do what you can to realize why you are waiting or keep yourself occupied in this wait. Don't be impatient. That's no way to live your life.

Cover Image Credit:

Aranxa Esteve

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24 Quotes You Will Only Hear When You Go Road Trippin' With Your Girls

*Someone's gas cap was unscrewed* "That's not supposed to happen."

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When you take a girls trip, you know some hilarious stuff is bound to come out of your friends' mouths. Two of my friends and I just went on a trip to Tennessee, which for us was an eight to nine-hour drive.

1. "Why are we stopping?"

2. "These motorcycle drivers are so reckless."

3. "There's more than enough room in front of you, you Volkswagen, speed up!"

4. "Come on, Tom Wood from Indiana!"

5. "Where's the Southern hospitality cause I sure don't see it."

6. We sped up multiple times to try to figure out what a license plate said and still couldn't figure it out.

7. "I'm following this Caddy. They're rich, they will take me to the front."

8. "We didn't get Southern hospitality cause they saw my Michigan license plate."

9. *Someone's gas cap was unscrewed* "That's not supposed to happen."

10. *Everyone else was admiring the scenery* "Look at the cute fire hydrant!"

11. "There's a turkey…No, that's a real turkey!"

12. We sang "She'll Be Coming Around The Mountain When She Comes" as we drove up the mountain.

13. *Going around the corners and mountains of Tennessee* Melissa: "Who's afraid to drive?" Me: *raises hand*

14. "Can we please learn how to drive our vehicles?"

15. "There's King f***ing Kong!"

16. "Tomb…I don't want to go."

17. "I need an oh sh*t bar."

18. "Normally I wouldn't care but I stepped in a puddle of an unknown substance, so here I am."

19. "You had food poisoning, you were drunk, and I was full of comments."

20. *Getting in the car with Melissa's phone dead, my phone on 3%, and Sarah's phone with no data* "God protect this Jeep."

21. "Be there for your friends. It doesn't seem like much but it's something you can get right every time."

22. "If I can explicitly see how big a bug is going 75 down the freeway, I don't want anything to do with it."

23. "Michigan roads, I still hate you but I'm glad to see you."

24. "I've never been so happy to see land so flat."

Cover Image Credit:

Raphael Rychetsky

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