Monica Lewinsky's #MeToo Is Valid

Monica Lewinsky's #MeToo Is Valid

Yes, it was consensual. No, she didn't ask to be the scapegoat.
1036
views

"I did not have sexual relations with that woman" is what former President Bill Clinton said in an interview back in 1998 when discussing his extramarital affair with the then 22-year-old intern, Monica Lewinsky.

That infamous line resulted in not only President Clinton being impeached for lying under oath, but propelled young Monica Lewinsky into the public eye.

Monica Lewinsky has stated that the affair she had with the President was a consensual affair. Yet, she also tweeted #MeToo in light of the movement taking root in the country. Many people have said that her experience does not fit with the #MeToo movement and that she should be quiet and move on with her life; they continue shaming her on the internet for an affair that occurred and ended two decades ago.

I'm not going to sit here and pretend that I also didn't say "Girl, sit down and relax." When I saw that she stated that her affair with the former President "constituted a gross abuse of power" I was confused and a little angry.

What power did the President of the United States have over her? She said it was consensual. She wasn't forced. So, I looked into it. The more I read, the more I saw what she was trying to say.

The "gross abuse of power" was not directly the power that the President had over her, it was the power the administration had.

The administration made her the scapegoat.

They blamed everything on her, shaming her, and humiliating her.

The power did not come from the fact that she was forced to do anything. The relationship was consensual. The power came from the fact that she was merely an intern who fell for the most powerful man on the planet.

But what does this have to do with the #MeToo movement?

Yes, the movement has been built on providing support for victims of sexual assault and sexual harassment who have been afraid to come forward. But the movement was also built on reducing the abuse of power that ends up haunting the victim later on in their life.

Monica Lewinsky was not forced or made to do anything. Except live with the fact that everyone in the world would know her as the former President's mistress. It won't matter if she cured cancer or ended world hunger: she's the girl that had that affair.

The administration made that certain. They made the affair public and made her the scapegoat. But it takes two to tango, so shaming her for an affair that was consensual is an abuse of power.

Go ahead and say that she doesn't belong with the rest of the victims of the movement. I'm standing behind her and her tweet of #MeToo. She belongs because she did not ask to be publicly shamed and humiliated.

She made a mistake and regrets it. Every day. She's just realized that the aftermath was not her fault because she is not solely to blame.

Cover Image Credit: Instagram

Popular Right Now

'Baby, It's Cold Outside' Is NOT About Date Rape, It's A Fight Against Social Norms Of The 1940s

The popular Christmas song shouldn't be considered inappropriate.

77226
views

The classic Christmas song "Baby, It's Cold Outside" has recently come under attack. There has been controversy over the song being deemed as inappropriate since it has been suggested that it promotes date rape. Others believe that the song is another common example of our culture's promotion of rape. You may be wondering, where did they get that idea from?

The controversy has led to one radio station, WDOK, taking the song off the air and banning it from their station. Some people believe that this song goes against the #MeToo movement since it promotes rape. However, people are not considering the fact that this traditional Christmas song was made in the 1940s.

People are viewing the song from a modern-day cultural perspective rather than from the perspective of the 1940s. "Baby, It's Cold Outside" was written in 1944. Many people have viewed the song from the perspective of our cultural and social norms. People believe that the song promotes date rape because of lyrics that suggest that the male singing is trying to stop the female singer from leaving, and the female singer is constantly singing about trying to escape with verses like "I really can't stay" or "I've got to go home."

When you first view the song from the perspective of today's culture, you may jump to the conclusion that the song is part of the date rape culture. And it's very easy to jump to this conclusion, especially when you are viewing only one line from the song. We're used to women being given more freedom. In our society, women can have jobs, marry and be independent. However, what everyone seems to forget is that women did not always have this freedom.

In 1944, one of the social norms was that women had curfews and were not allowed to be in the same house as a man at a later time. It was considered a scandal if a single woman so much as stayed at another man's house, let alone be in the same room together. It's mind-blowing, right? You can imagine that this song was probably considered very provocative for the time period.

"Baby, It's Cold Outside" is not a song that encourages date rape, but is actually challenging the social norms of society during the time period. When you listen to the song, you notice that at one part of the song, the female states, "At least I can say that I tried," which suggests that she really doesn't want to leave. In fact, most of the song, she is going back and forth the whole time about leaving stating, "I ought to say no…well maybe just a half a drink more," and other phrases.

She doesn't want to leave but doesn't really have a choice due to fear of causing a scandal, which would have consequences with how others will treat her. It was not like today's society where nobody cares how late someone stays at another man's house. Nowadays, we could care less if we heard that our single neighbor stayed over a single man's house after 7. We especially don't try to look through our curtain to check on our neighbor. Well, maybe some of us do. But back then, people did care about where women were and what they were doing.

The female singer also says in the lyrics, "The neighbors might think," and, "There's bound to be talk tomorrow," meaning she's scared of how others might perceive her for staying with him. She even says, "My sister will be suspicious," and, "My brother will be there at the door," again stating that she's worried that her family will find out and she will face repercussions for her actions. Yes, she is a grown woman, but that doesn't mean that she won't be treated negatively by others for going against the social norms of the time period.

Then why did the male singer keep pressuring her in the song? This is again because the song is more about challenging the social norms of the time period. Both the female and male singers in the song are trying to find excuses to stay and not leave.

On top of that, when you watch the video of the scene in which the song was originally viewed, you notice that the genders suddenly switch for another two characters, and now it's a female singer singing the male singer's part and vice versa. You also notice that the whole time, both characters are attracted to one another and trying to find a way to stay over longer.

Yes, I know you're thinking it doesn't matter about the genders. But, the song is again consensual for both couples. The woman, in the beginning, wants to stay but knows what will await if she doesn't leave. The male singer meanwhile is trying to convince her to forget about the rules for the time period and break them.

In addition, the complaint regarding the lyric "What's in this drink?" is misguided. What a lot of people don't understand is that back in 1944, this was a common saying. If you look at the lyrics of the song, you notice that the woman who is singing is trying to blame the alcoholic drink for causing her to want to stay longer instead of leaving early. It has nothing to do with her supposed fear that he may have tried to give her too much to drink in order to date rape her. Rather, she is trying to find something to blame for her wanting to commit a scandal.

As you can see, when you view the song from the cultural perspective of the 1940s, you realize that the song could be said to fight against the social norms of that decade. It is a song that challenges the social constrictions against women during the time period. You could even say that it's an example of women's rights, if you wanted to really start an argument.

Yes, I will admit that there were movies and songs made back in the time period that were part of the culture of date rape. However, this song is not the case. It has a historical context that cannot be viewed from today's perspective.

The #MeToo movement is an important movement that has led to so many changes in our society today. However, this is not the right song to use as an example of the date rape culture.

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

10 Pieces Of Advice From Kid President That Got Us Through Our Toughest Days

He might be young, but he's so wise.

118
views

The Kid President made his debut in 2012 and has impacted many lives with his positivity and kind words. He provides insight into negative situations and gives us all words to live by. Here are 10 times his words helped us get through the day.

1. When we didn't want to follow through with plans.

Giphy

We've all been in the position where we had a bad day and wanted to cancel our plans. People want you there, so it's true: just you being there does make it awesome.

2. When you felt like you were struggling as a parent.

Giphy

Your kids love you as a parent. They look up to you and value everything you do! Realistically, you're doing a great job and your kids see it, too.

3. When you felt like quitting.

Giphy

You might be an adult, but there's still a force within you to keep you going.

4. When you felt overwhelmed.

Giphy

Kid President gives great advice when it comes to being stressed: pause, breathe, love. It only takes a few minutes to pause and breathe in order to get back on track.

5. When you felt like you didn't matter.

Giphy

You're here for a reason and have a spot on this planet, you matter.

6. When you saw your cousin post something political on Facebook.

Giphy

Post-election Facebook was a battleground full of insults and disagreements. It's okay to disagree, but there's no reason for us to go out of our way to make someone else feel bad about their position.

7. When you someone cut you off driving and you want to hawk them down.

Giphy

... then don't do it. Plain and simple. It won't do anyone any good to go after someone for something that really isn't a big deal.

8. When you felt like no one was listening.

Giphy

You have so much to say and share, people will listen, especially if you have good things to say.

9. When you felt like you didn't know what you're doing.

Giphy

If you're wearing pants and have toilet paper, you're doing a good job being an adult.

10. When you needed encouragement to get up.

Giphy

Straight to the point, let's do it. You don't have to do it alone, but you have to do it.

Kid President is the king of good advice. It's all put in simple terms because we don't need to complicate anything anymore.

Related Content

Facebook Comments