Kojima's Weird World

Kojima's Weird World

Death Stranding's VGA trailer is certainly stirring excitement.
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Well, that happened.

At last night's Video Game Awards Kojima stole the show with a strange look into his mysterious new project, "Death Stranding."

In the entirety of the gaming industry there are few creators quite like Hideo Kojima. The man behind the classic Metal Gear franchise has written and directed around 14 different projects over the course of his three-decade career working on video games. Each of these endeavours have been packed with cinematic action sequences, fascinating characters, and oftentimes bizarre melodrama. Kojima's scripts have always been delightfully strange trips down the rabbit hole of militarism, espionage, and the philosophy of the battlefield. Though at times his work can be heavy-handed and so damn surreal you will start to wonder if you took something before playing, he is undeniably and unabashedly creative.

Kojima's willingness to explore the odd and unpleasant is on full display in the second trailer for his upcoming game "Death Stranding": his first foray into the gaming industry after the hostile legal mess that was his expulsion from Konami. Now, with his own studio and a much deserved Industry Icon award in hand, he is prodding the excitement of fans the world over.

The first trailer, starring a nude Norman Reedus stranded alone on a beach strewn with the decaying bodies of marine animals, was so blatantly "Kojima" in its oddball artiness and deviously cryptic nature. Though it gave no real indication of what the hell was actually going on in the game, it managed to pique interest around the net. What was this weird new project Kojima was working on? Why is Norman Reedus buck naked on a beach of whale corpses? Am I high? If there is anything the man is talented at it is building curiosity in gamers.



With the VGA 2016 trailer that he premiered live last night, Kojima-san has outdone himself. If the first trailer was weird, then the second is downright nuts. Heaving synths pulse in and out of the background as Guillermo Del Toro -- the Mexican film maker behind dark fantasy horror films such as "Pan's Labyrinth" and the sci-fi Kaiju flick "Pacific Rim" -- traverses an oily landscape of more dead sea creatures while carrying a baby in some sort of artificial robotic womb. That alone is weird enough to have people puzzling over it for some time, but things only get more surreal from there. In just about five minutes the viewer is treated to a floating baby doll with a nail through its head, black tendrils slithering over a lifeless war-torn city, oozing worm creatures on a tank and actor Mads Mikkelson controlling a squad of undead United States soldiers from World War II.

Does that description sound absolutely insane? Then it is probably doing what it is supposed to. Despite how absurd it all seems, the trailer does come together quite nicely, building a sense of unease as it takes you through a small snippet of this new, dark world. Having watched the trailer about five or six times already all I can really say is that I have no idea what the hell it is, but I like it and want more. Kojima-san, you have my attention.


Cover Image Credit: Polygon

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Does Technology Make Us More Alone?

Technology -- we all love it and we all use it, but how is it affecting us?
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In this day and age, it is near impossible to do anything without the use of technology. You can pay your bills, manage your bank accounts and even chat with a customer service representative all with the use of your smartphone.

Is the use of technology starting to take away from our person-to-person interaction? Think about how often you grab your smartphone or tablet and text your friends instead of picking up the phone to call them or, better yet, making plans to hang out in person.

Technology is supposed to make us feel more connected by allowing us to stay in touch with our friends by using social media sites such as Facebook or Twitter and of course, texting. But are our smartphones getting in the way of socializing? Does technology make us feel more alone?

There is a term that is commonly used, "FOMO" –– short for "fear of missing out." Yes, this is a real thing. If for some crazy reason you don't check your Twitter or Facebook news feed every 10 minutes are you really missing out?

The fact that we have become so dependent on knowing exactly what is going on in other people's lives is sad. We should be focusing on our own lives and our own interactions and relationships with people.

Technology is making us more alone because instead of interacting with our friends in person, we are dependent on using our phones or tablets. We start to compare ourselves and our lives to others because of how many likes we get on our Instagram photos.

We are forgetting how to use our basic communication skills because we aren't interacting with each other, anymore. We are too busy with our noses in our phones. Young kids are dependent on a tablet to keep them entertained rather than playing with toys. That is not how I want my children to grow up.

As a society, we will start to become very lonely people if we don't start making changes. We are ruining personal relationships because of the addiction to our smartphones and checking our social media sites every five minutes.

It's time for us to own our mistakes and start to change. Next time you reach for your phone, stop yourself. When you are with your friends, ignore your phone and enjoy the company of your loved ones around you.

Technology is a great thing, but it is also going to be the thing that tears us apart as a society if we don't make changes on how dependent we are on it.

Cover Image Credit: NewsOK

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4 Substitutes For Social Media

From an existential crisis at the eye doctor.

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Perhaps the most perplexing question I have ever received has been from my eye doctor. I go for a checkup every summer, and I get asked this same question every time, but for some reason, it always ignites an existential crisis in my soul. "How many hours do you spend on your phone?" Yikes. The first couple times, I tended to underestimate my addiction to my screen, "Maybe two hours," I would reply. This answer was always met with a scornful stare that dug deep into the brain. After a few years of back and forth, we settled on six hours, but part of me believes, in fact, knows, that I am once again underestimating myself. So how many hours do I truly spend on my phone? I am not one hundred percent sure. I know that there is a feature in the settings of my iPhone that can tell me, but there is no way I am ever checking that.

Why am I so scared of finding out the real number? Well, because it will simply confirm what I already know about myself: I spend way too much time on my phone, and I know I am not the only one. Besides the fact that my generation's eyesight will probably be shot by forty, we are locked into a virtual life and missing the one that is flying right before our eyes. We are all constantly trying to live the best lives, but is it for our own benefit or for the benefit of our social image? Graciously, I say that fifty percent of my efforts are heard towards the latter. So in this season of my life or extreme self-evaluation and in an effort to rewire my brain before I'm set in my ways when my brain stops developing, I am offering up substitutes to social media for my own benefit and for the benefit of my generational counterparts.

1. Instagram? Go on a walk instead

https://goodstock.photos/people-walking-by-street/

We love posting pictures of pretty things, but do we actually enjoy the pretty things? I mean, I rarely look at my 107 pictures of the Eiffel Tower. So maybe if we could substitute taking and posting pictures for Instagram, we would see so much more than our limited screen has to offer. There is life in nature and in cities. Breathing life. Not digital life.

2. Twitter? Why not hang out with your friends?

https://pixabay.com/en/fashion-young-people-teens-1219507/

I love a good laugh just as much the next guy, so Twitter is my go to for giggles. But how often do I actually laugh out loud to tweets in my bed? Okay, sometimes, I will admit it. But I have found that sharing tweets with my friends gives me the most joy, so why not, I don't know, share thoughts with my friends? Conversation. If you think your friends are funny online, boy oh boy you'll be surprised to see just how funny they can be in real life.

3. Facebook? Dear God, anything else. How about a book?

https://stocksnap.io/photo/H0VXBZUZP3

Ah, Facebook. I love reading posts that share every part of someone's daily life. You did laundry today? Awesome, Mom! A book, though, a book shares all the essential parts of a story. It's exciting. Riveting. I think we can all agree that we lose brain cells spending time of Facebook, but has anyone ever got dumber from reading? I think not.

4. Snapchat? Stare at your friends. It's awesome, trust me.

https://pixabay.com/en/boy-children-guys-human-watch-1105891/

Okay, this one is a joke. But seriously. There are a million things you can do other than sending pictures of your face back and forth with your friends (or you feet if you're having a fight). Bake a cake. Do some work. Discover your passion. Build real relationships. Half of the people I Snapchat, I don't even to.

TNow I'm not damning social media to Hell. It can be a fun thing, and it is engrained in our generation; it is not going away any time soon. My suggestions seem simplistic and silly, but are we actually prioritizing these things over social media? Probably not. But maybe we can learn to take a step back. Maybe we can learn to live our lives rather than living through our favorite vlogger. Maybe we can be able to face our eye doctors with honesty. Maybe we can gain back some of that wondrous gaze in our eyes that we had before they became blinded by the light of our smartphones.

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