Bribery And Ivy League Admissions

Bribery And Ivy League Admissions

The FBI is spilling some tea.

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The admissions process at Ivy League universities has remained pretty sketchy for quite some time. Race, relation to alumni, and economic status appear to play a large role in an individual student's admittance. In fact, according to research from a 2011 study, children of alumni had a 3.13 times more likely chance to receive admission when compared to non-legacies.

On March 12th, 2019, the United States Department of Justice published eight documents charging 50 individuals with bribing Ivy League universities in order to admit privileged, possibly unqualified children. Among the accused are 33 parents as well as coaches of Olympic sports at the universities. Two of these individuals are TV stars Felicity Hoffman ("American Crime"...haha, how ironic!) and Lori Loughlin ("Summerland"). Apparently, the crimes committed include racketeering (fraudulent business dealings), mail fraud, alteration of examination scores, and lying about participation in athletic sports. Charges faced by the actresses could be up to five years behind bars if plea deals are excluded.

Some of the schools affected by this conspiracy include Yale University, Stanford University, and Georgetown University. Prosecutors have said that they have not charged any students, instead saying that the parents were the scheme's principal conductors. FBI Special Agent Joseph Bonavolonta has stated that parents have paid from $200,000 to $6.5 million in order for their children to obtain acceptance, some under the facade of charitable donations. According to Andrew Lelling, Boston's attorney, this may be the largest ever college admissions scandal prosecuted by the United States Department of Justice.

Unfortunately, I doubt that much will come out of this. I assume that the defendants will be subjected to hefty fines and damage in reputation, but not much else. I'm also very skeptical about the Ivies changing their admissions processes in the near future in light of this scandal. It seems that hard work will never really be enough for students who are pushed against wealthy competitors or legacy children. Sure, there are stories of kids getting into their dream schools through nothing but sheer determination, but many are turned away for unfair reasons. After all, in 2017, one-third of Harvard's incoming class were legacies. The advantage isn't fair, especially to those who are more qualified but lack the substantial boost in acceptance that being related to an alumnus provides.

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10 Ways College Is 100% NOTHING Like High School

Once-a-day showers go to dry shampoo for four days straight.

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As a college freshman well into their second semester, it has officially occurred to me just how different, and often times better, college is compared to its predecessor, high school.

Here are just 10 ways the two could not be MORE different:

1. How you sleep

You'll go from waking up three hours before school to three minutes before class

2. How you hygiene

Once-a-day showers develop into dry shampoo for four days straight.

3. How you eat

Pizza goes from a once-in-a-while treat to an everyday food group.

4. How you socialize

You'll go from being nice to everyone to disliking people for no reason.

5. How much effort you put into your appearance

High school contour was on fleek and now there's somehow mascara on your forehead.

6. How you nap

Naps go from two hours to 10 minutes.

7. How you operate heavy machinery

Driving goes from 10 and 2 with perfectly lined up mirrors to driving with your knees and eating a taco.

8. Your classmates

High school classes are with all of your friends and college classes have strangers in them almost every day.

9. The people teaching you things

High school teachers are scary and mean, while college professors become your friends.

10. Textbooks

High school textbooks are provided where college textbooks need to be bought with another student loan.

Cover Image Credit: Instargram//Madsbythesea

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I'm About To Burst, Laughing At The People Who Thought My Pregnancy Meant I Had To Drop Out Of College

I get stared at in the halls and asked if I am going to drop out. Here are ways being a pregnant student has changed my college experience.

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I have been pregnant the entire time that I have been in graduate school. It was not how I planned to experience grad school, but it has opened my eyes to a whole new perspective and will give me a lovely son (seriously, any second now). There are certain things that I did not realize about being a pregnant student until I experienced it, and maybe my experiences can help better prepare other women, or give them something to relate to since pregnant students are such a rare breed.

As a grad student and a 25-year-old, I am around the average age to have my first child in America. I am not dependent on my parents and the world does not treat me like a child anymore.

However, since I decided to pursue my master's degree, I feel that people are not used to seeing pregnant and student in the same sentence without gasping.

When I first told my father, his first reaction was to ask me if I was to going to drop out.

This became a recurrent reaction from my family and friends (which my boyfriend who is also a student was never asked once). I did not expect the hesitant reactions and it made me feel shameful to be a pregnant student. As my expecting belly grew I always noticed that people on campus would stare at my stomach.

As I walked past, their eyes followed my belly like I had a giant red felt "A" on my chest.

None of my classmates are pregnant and thinking back, I can't remember ever seeing a pregnant woman in all of my five years of college. Since none of my classmates were pregnant, I felt like I had no one to relate to. There are a lot of things that pregnancy effects, besides the baby in the tummy part. I could not go out and get drinks with my classmates and bond with them the way that they were all doing. I could not relate to them fashionably because maternity clothes are heinous. I also feel like pregnancy put up a barrier because I would have a baby eventually and will always be busy, so why bother?

Pregnancy side effects would sometimes take a toll on my school work. In the first trimester, I could barely get out of bed because I was so tired. I could easily have slept 14 hours straight and being a working student did not help. I would seep through some of my classes and had to take the hit to my attendance points. I also have "pregnancy brain." Pregnancy brain is a real thing and is not well known enough. My mind can be so scattered that I forget my friend's names while I am speaking to them. I think it is October when it is March. Pregnancy brain has made me forget that I even go to school or that I work in twenty minutes. I missed due dates or completely misread instructions on assignments. For someone who needs A's on every assignment to function, it hurt because I would never make that mistake otherwise.

There are also benefits to being a pregnant student. I am never hungover and I have never been tempted to ditch a night class for a drinking holiday.

Pregnancy has allowed me to prioritize my school work and ignore the college lifestyle.

Before I knew I was pregnant, I went with my roommates to bars in Chicago's Lincoln Park. I feel so happy knowing getting wasted from $3 shots on a Wednesday is behind me. I now truly have nothing better to do at night than complete my homework.

Another benefit is that you sometimes get special treatment. The special treatment that pregnant women get is awesome. It is my favorite part and sometimes makes me wish I could be pregnant forever. People feel obligated to wait on me hand and foot. If I drop something, people rush to pick it up. It is completely not necessary but I get to feel like a princess for a day (or 280 days). Even though I was singled out for being the only pregnant woman, I was always treated especially nicely by students and professors.

Regardless of my friends and family expecting me to drop out, I am doing phenomenal in grad school. I have received A's in every class and have loved all of my classes. Being a pregnant student can be tough, but it is totally doable. If you find yourself to be a pregnant student, don't feel discouraged. It is not ruining your college experience but allowing you to do college differently.

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