Internet Freedom Is Being Stolen

Internet Freedom Is Being Stolen

Protesting against net neutrality in America.
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Do you love the internet as much as everyone else in America? Well, hold onto that love because your internet freedom is going to be stolen from you.

Net neutrality is the basic principle that you have the right to access anything on the internet you want without your internet service provider (ISP) slowing down or blocking any content. This is about to change.

In just a couple months, net neutrality will be completely destroyed and ISPs will have complete control over what internet you are allowed to access. Fundamentally, the more money you pay your ISP equals a larger internet range.

In 2015, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) passed net neutrality protection based on Title II of the Communications Act, strengthening internet freedom as much as possible.

However, on May 18, the FCC voted to allow Ajit Pai, Trump's FCC chairman, to pass his plan on destroying net neutrality.

This plan is great for big phone and cable companies. Is it great for the general public as well? Not so much.

The struggle to earn the freedom of speech in America is a well-known one and is dictated in the first amendment. This plan will rid the internet of free speech and ISPs will be able to decide who gets heard and who doesn't.

It's convenient that the amendments America is built on don't apply to President Trump and his chairmen.

How come so many people don't know about net neutrality? It's not a big deal if it's not popular, right?

Wrong. Millions of people around America have made a stand about net neutrality and the only reason there aren't more people protesting is because the FCC is trying to keep this as quiet as possible, predicting the negative reactions the public will have and does have.

The Internet Association, including Google, Twitter, Uber, Netflix and many more, as well as other internet communication sites, like Discord, are speaking out against internet restrictions.

If you think this won't apply to you, you're wrong. This will impact all internet-users.

Lucky for us, the public still maintains the rights the first amendment guarantees us that the FCC would like to ignore and we are able to peacefully assemble and protest, as so many are currently doing.

Spread the word about net neutrality and tell your friends about what is happening. Knowledge is a weapon!

Most importantly, take a stand to maintain net neutrality. Don't say goodbye to open internet; welcome it back to America.

Join the millions of other people protesting against this grotesque coercion and speak your mind! Tell the FFC what net neutrality means to you at https://www.fcc.gov/ecfs/search/proceedings?q=name:((17-108)) by clicking +express. Simply fill out the required information and tell FFC what you think in the comment section.


Don't let your open internet be taken away. Tell everyone you know about what's going on and stand up for what you believe in. Good luck, America.


Cover Image Credit: The Flying Machines

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I'm The Girl Without A 'Friend Group'

And here's why I'm OK with it

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Little things remind me all the time.

For example, I'll be sitting in the lounge with the people on my floor, just talking about how everyone's days went. Someone will turn to someone else and ask something along the lines of, "When are we going to so-and-so's place tonight?" Sometimes it'll even be, "Are you ready to go to so-and-so's place now? Okay, we'll see you later, Taylor!"

It's little things like that, little things that remind me I don't have a "friend group." And it's been like that forever. I don't have the same people to keep me company 24 hours of the day, the same people to do absolutely everything with, and the same people to cling to like glue. I don't have a whole cast of characters to entertain me and care for me and support me. Sometimes, especially when it feels obvious to me, not having a "friend group" makes me feel like a waste of space. If I don't have more friends than I can count, what's the point in trying to make friends at all?

I can tell you that there is a point. As a matter of fact, just because I don't have a close-knit clique doesn't mean I don't have any friends. The friends I have come from all different walks of life, some are from my town back home and some are from across the country. I've known some of my friends for years, and others I've only known for a few months. It doesn't really matter where they come from, though. What matters is that the friends I have all entertain me, care for me, and support me. Just because I'm not in that "friend group" with all of them together doesn't mean that we can't be friends to each other.

Still, I hate avoiding sticking myself in a box, and I'm not afraid to seek out friendships. I've noticed that a lot of the people I see who consider themselves to be in a "friend group" don't really venture outside the pack very often. I've never had a pack to venture outside of, so I don't mind reaching out to new people whenever.

I'm not going to lie, when I hear people talking about all the fun they're going to have with their "friend group" over the weekend, part of me wishes I could be included in something like that. I do sometimes want to have the personality type that allows me to mesh perfectly into a clique. I couldn't tell you what it is about me, but there is some part of me that just happens to function better one-on-one with people.

I hated it all my life up until very recently, and that's because I've finally learned that not having a "friend group" is never going to be the same as not having friends.

SEE ALSO: To The Girls Who Float Between Friend Groups

Cover Image Credit: wordpress.com

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The Fake World - My Personal Experience On Instagram

Body Dysmorphia, Followers, and Posting Photos—How can Instagram NOT affect my mental health.

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The sticker on Kendall Jenner's phone says, "social media seriously harms your mental health." Despite her heavy presence online, she and many others are taking steps towards pointing out the dangers of Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, and other social media.

While it may seem like a source of inspiration, social media (Instagram in particular), seems to be causing people like me more negativity than anything else.

"People like me…", what does this mean? I am a 19-year-old female college student with serious body dysmorphia. By definition, body dysmorphia is "a distinct mental disorder in which a person is preoccupied with an imagined physical defect or a minor defect that others often cannot see." Those with the disorder often perceive themselves as ugly or obsess over ways to improve their physical appearance.

I grew up in the ballet world—one that emphasizes your weight and bases a large amount of success on attaining a specific body type. The ideal silhouette is long, willowy, and malnourished-looking. I have a more muscular build for a ballet dancer. Some days I see myself as a beautiful person on the inside and out, and other days I am the complete opposite.

My body dysmorphia comes and goes, but I know this: every time I open the Instagram app, I become consumed with my physical appearance and attaining the perfect body. I end up in a comparison game that I did not sign up for, obsessing over my imperfections and ultimately feeling unhappy despite all the blessings I have been given.

I initially created an Instagram to follow the trends—everyone at the time (when I was in middle school and high school in the 2010s) had an account and posted cool, artsy photos. I wanted to join in because I liked being behind the camera. Soon enough, however, Instagram started to place emphasis on being in front of the camera and now, seems to be a competition about who can look the best and show the most skin. As someone who is not always comfortable in her own skin no matter the outfit, it becomes quite the struggle to keep up with the followers, likes, comments, and appearance of being confident.

It was not until this year that I started to realize "the fake" in just about every photo on my feed. The "Instagram models," real-life models, and others post constantly because it brings fame, attention, and for some, confidence. I applaud anyone who believes Instagram is a positive in their lives, but many people that I know feel the same way I do—even without explicitly saying so. I am constantly reminding myself that people pay to have their photos edited. There are other apps like Facetune which are designed to alter the real-you into Instagram-you. I believe Instagram is wishful thinking—wishing you really look like what you post. While I take part in the comparison game, comparing every part of my body to famous models, I do not take part in the paid editing game. I do not have apps that will give me a jawline or thinner legs. I do not have an app that will change my face shape. I do not applaud myself on this, as I am more self-conscious than ever and have not posted a photo since February.

However, I am strong enough to know that the fake world on Instagram does not take into account real-life aspects like someone's charisma, personality, voice, behavior, etc. It does not guarantee you friends, likes, or happiness. It is taking a chance to put yourself out there, however you wish. It is up to you to interpret what you see and have a sense of your own self-worth.

With this being said, Instagram does come with some benefits. There are a few brave souls who are not afraid to post un-edited photos and who do bring awareness to the falseness and extreme editing. Instagram also comes with accounts not dedicated to selfies, but that serve as platforms for important causes such as human suffering, pollution of the earth, animal brutality, and the like.

Instagram is overwhelming with its positives and negatives, and it is up to me to decide what to believe and what to perceive as false. I find it helpful to take breaks from the app by logging out. Whenever I do decide to post next, I will do my best to post for ME, thinking about my own well-being and creating a positive message for all.

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