Inclusivity, Intent, and Dove's Racist Advertising

Inclusivity, Intent, and Dove's Racist Advertising

Dove's problematic advertisement is receiving backlash all over the internet.
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Many Brands have taken it upon themselves to become more inclusive of all people in their advertising campaigns; however, all progress comes with many setbacks, and it just so happens that many of these setbacks are racist in context. Dove, Shea Moisture, and Pepsi to name a few of the brands who are responsible for problematic advertising, have all spoken out against the ads they previously posted stating that it wasn’t their intention to make a racist advertisement, but the damage had already been done making these textbook examples of intention versus impact.

Perhaps Dove did make the mistake they claimed to not realize was a mistake, but this is a spilt milk situation or maybe a chocolate-milk situation. The advertisement that Dove recently released on Facebook depicts a Woman of Color removing her shirt and as the shirt is removed a Caucasian woman appears where the Woman of Color once was, and during the entire advertisement a Dove bottle was placed in the lower right-hand corner. At first glance this seems harmless, but that is only if someone is oblivious to the history of skin whitening and the desire for fair skin by using bleach and cleaning products as an attempt to wash away melanin.

There is a dark history in America of fair skin being preferred over darker skin, of course racism is a factor in this, but specifically speaking about the Black community and internalized racism this advertisement plays upon that preference. The desire to have fair skin is one constructed in a society that favors people who possess this ineffectual trait, and in the recent Dove advertisement this fallacious desire for fair skin is fully depicted. The context of skin whitening and the preference for fair skin is a phenomenon that is talked about frequently in the black community, which is my main concern for the advertisement because it not only reveals how oblivious Dove is but it also may suggest that no people of color were involved in the creation process of the advertisement other than the actor of color included in the beginning, who seems annoyed that the advertisement was being misinterpreted.

How could a brand that preaches about inclusivity not employ people whom they are trying to include? Shea Moisture is another brand responsible for the same misstep, and it’s troubling to think that this will not be the last time a story of this caliber, so what is the solution to this problem? Ironically, the solution is the exact purpose of the advertisements in the first place, diversity, not just on camera but behind the camera and all throughout an organization. If certain voices are left out of a conversation and only present to save face issues such as this advertisement will continue to occur.

The advertisement “missed its mark” as placed by Dove execs who apologized for the ad, but that doesn’t free them for what they did. In situation such as this where intent differs from impact it seems only fair to forgive those who committed the transgression, but it’s not that simple when the issue harms other in the process. Intent is inconsequential when dealing with the impact of that action. Dove’s apology is far from change they are empty words, and this is something observed by many twitter users who have planned to boycott Dove for the time being.

Dove apologized for the offensive advertisement, but what will they actually do to make sure it doesn’t happen again in the future?

Cover Image Credit: Youtube

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37 Things Growing Up in the South Taught You

Where the tea is sweet, but the people are sweeter.
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1. The art of small talking.
2. The importance of calling your momma.
3. The beauty of sweet tea.
4. How to use the term “ma'am” or “sir” (that is, use it as much as possible).
5. Real flowers are way better than fake flowers.
6. Sometimes you only have two seasons instead of four.
7. Fried chicken is the best kind of chicken.
8. When it comes to food, always go for seconds.
9. It is better to overdress for Church than underdress.
10. Word travels fast.
11. Lake days are better than beach days.
12. Handwritten letters never go out of style.
13. If a man doesn’t open the door for you on the first date, dump him.
14. If a man won’t meet your family after four dates, dump him.
15. If your family doesn’t like your boyfriend, dump him.
16. Your occupation doesn’t matter as long as you're happy.
17. But you should always make sure you can support your family.
18. Rocking chairs are by far the best kind of chairs.
19. Cracker Barrel is more than a restaurant, it's a lifestyle.
20. Just 'cause you are from Florida and it is in the south does not make you Southern.
21. High School football is a big deal.
22. If you have a hair dresser for more than three years, never change. Trust her and only her.
23. The kids in your Sunday school class in third grade are also in your graduating class.
24. Makeup doesn’t work in the summer.
25. Laying out is a hobby.
26. Moms get more into high school drama than high schoolers.
27. Sororities are a family affair.
28. You never know how many adults you know 'til its time to get recommendation letters for rush.
29. SEC is the best, no question.
30. You can't go wrong buying a girl Kendra Scotts.
31. People will refer to you by your last name.
32. Biscuits and gravy are bae.
33. Sadie Robertson is a role model.
34. If it is game day you should be dressed nice.
35. If you pass by a child's lemonade stand you better buy lemonade from her. You're supporting capitalism.
36. You are never too old to go home for just a weekend… or just a meal.
37. You can’t imagine living anywhere but the South.



































Cover Image Credit: Grace Valentine

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Men, My 'Plan B' Is Also Your 'Plan B' So Be Prepared To Cough Up

Unprotected takes two people, dude.

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Now, not that I know a whole lot of anything on this subject. But I am very passionate about men and women being equals as well as often having the opinion that "men are trash."

When having sex, in any circumstance, it takes two willing partners who are aware of the conditions of the activity. When having unprotected sex, it is even more important to make sure both partners are on the same terms. Now, personally, I think having unprotected sex is a stupid and unnecessary risk. Not only do you run a pregnancy risk, but you run an STI risk as well.

But, if two people are going to have unprotected sex, it is a good idea to have a plan for emergency contraceptives. If you think you're going to get laid without agreeing to help pay or placing the responsibility of Plan B on the woman, you're wrong and I am more than willing to tell you why.

First of all, Plan B is expensive and sex is not worth the cost. It is $50 for just one pill. If you think sex with someone who is too cheap to pay for it is worth it, you're a few screws loose. I don't care who you are, it's not worth it.

Second of all, the woman is not the only person engaging in sex. It takes two people to engage in successful consensual sexual intercourse. Therefore, it should take to people to pay for the emergency contraceptive. I am petty enough to take money from your wallet. Don't try me.

Third, it's 2018. Women and men are becoming equals. Therefore, you need to walk yourself right on out of 1952 and stop telling women what their responsibilities are and are not. Women are tired of men dictating what they should and shouldn't do. If you can run around telling women Plan B is their job we can tell you that cleaning up all of the mess that sex leaves is your job.

I will tell you right now, I will never cover the cost of Plan B on my own when I didn't have sex alone. So you have three options here: a.) split the cost b.) wear a condom c.) have a child.

The cost of Plan B One Step birth control at Walgreens is $49.99. And I again state, we will split it. So, split in half that's roughly $24.99. Condoms, on average, cost from $2-$6 for a pack of 3. A baby, on average in the United States costs $10,808. So, I beg the question, A five minute $24.99 trip to Walgreens for Plan B, a relatively cheap box of condoms, or $10,808+ multiplied over 18 years of life?

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