If should have a child someday, I hope she is tall. It’s not that I would love any gender, race, shape or size child any less than another, but I have some thoughts to share with tall girls on the subject of growing up.

Like when she is going through puberty: I would tell her the reason certain size pants, shirts and jackets do not fit her the same way they do some other girls is because she has longer arms, a longer torso and longer legs than other girls do. And because anything in a size “tall” also assumes that the wearer is not curvy in any way. Her size is perfect the way it is. To allow a label to define her self-worth is a recipe for an empty existence.

On dating: Attraction, be it physical, emotional and/or intellectual, one prominent concept defines the difference between a romantic interest and a platonic one. Physical attraction plays a prominent role when differentiating friendship and relationships. It’s not superficial to think so, but simply the fact that people are attracted to different physical attributes. If the attraction is not there than the relationship may not be either. Tall girls are supposed to be attracted to tall guys, they are supposed to only date tall guys. Otherwise, society tells us that it doesn’t look right. Society is wrong. We should be looking at the couple in how they see each other. So date tall or date short, date whomever you choose. Don't base that choice on society’s expectations.

When she is picking out shoes for prom: If you are in love with a pair of shoes, put them back on the shelf because they are too expensive not because the heel is too high. Your date, be it a young man or a young woman or just a group of friends, should not be a determining factor in your choice of footwear. I remember when I was at the mall searching desperately for kitten heels that went with my dress and ignoring the beautiful heels that were more than two inches in fear that my date would look short. In my exasperating search, a woman working at one of the stores said one very simple thing to me: “Girl, if you look good in the shoes why should anything else matter. You’re tall, and you should rock that sh*t." Since that day, I can proudly say that I have purchased and even ruined some beautiful heels of all sizes

Tall is beautiful.

To that assh*le at the party who asks who invited the Amazons: First of all, this guy single-handedly is trying to turn the concept of a planet of independent, confident, sexy and fearless women into an insult. I do not think I need to elaborate on how short-sighted that is. To that small-minded individual that tries to turn your gift of being tall into a negative thing, know that if you were actually an Amazon it would be all too easy to physically crush him into the tiny being that he is so that his outsides reflect his insides.

When you’re taking a group photo with people shorter than you: Don't you ever shrink for anyone. Don’t you ever slouch to make others appear taller. If the people you surround yourself with expect you to hunch down so they look taller, then you need new people. By physically shrinking you are basically saying to those people in the photo and the world that you are willing to make yourself smaller to build others up when you should be building yourself up and inspiring and supporting others to do the same. Never make your star less bright so others can shine. If you are perfectly who you are and comfortable with who that person is, people will come to you. In a group of friends there should be a balance and a desire to empower one another.

In no way is this advice only applicable for young tall women, but that is my point of reference when machete-ing my way through the jungle that is adolescence. That’s exactly it. I know these things because I experienced them firsthand and am guilty of learning them the hard way and eventually discovering for myself what it truly means to stand tall. As parents, for which I have no point of reference only my personal conjecture, we should want to start our kids off confidently, especially with the ever growing rates of depression and suicide. We should be celebrating self-confidence and with that perhaps future generations can accomplish more without focusing on the trivial.