Home is a COIN Show in Atlanta

Home is a COIN Show in Atlanta

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Indie pop band COIN is known for their ability to foster a sense of community in any city they step foot into. Their show in Atlanta was no exception, which was clear to any passerby near the Buckhead Theatre on Wednesday, February 6. A line of fans wrapped around the building as far as the eye could see - some had been there as early as 4 am. Lead singer Chase Lawrence was especially excited to be back in Atlanta. They played Buckhead Theatre a year earlier, but this time around, it was completely sold out.

Chase Lawrence in Atlanta

With the 2017 release of "Talk Too Much" from their most recent album, "How Will You Know If You Never Try," COIN began to rapidly gain popularity. Each single that followed proved their lyrical and musical talent. Following HWYKIYNT, COIN has been releasing newer singles, the most recent one being "I Want It All." This tour has been all about showing fans the meaning behind COIN's upbeat, indie-pop sound and helping people feel at home. The phrase "Home is a COIN show" is popular among their ever-growing fanbase. In Atlanta, COIN proved this phrase to be true. Four Atlanta fans spoke about how much this show meant to them.

Joe Memmel in Atlanta

How did you find out about COIN and what drew you to them originally?

Burnie Stone: I found "Fingers Crossed" on an 8tracks playlist back in late 2015, and I liked their sound so much that I looked them up on Youtube. Eventually, I just added their entire first album to my library, and then "Talk Too Much" dropped, and the rest was history.

Savannah Halberstadt: I found out about COIN when I saw them open for the 1975 in Knoxville a few years ago. Their energy on stage [was and still is] absolutely astonishing. I had never really fallen in love with an opening band before, but I completely did that day.

Chase Lawrence in Atlanta

What is it about COIN's music that made you continue to listen? What led them to becoming one of your favorite bands?

Brittney Clark: COIN has a sound that is very different than a lot of artists you hear today. Most of their music is very upbeat but their lyrics hold so much meaning.

Rachel Cummings: No other music has impacted me the way COIN's music has. It's hard to put into words, but their songs mean so much to me. Screaming lyrics I love as loud as I can is an indescribable feeling.

Burnie: I'm extremely picky with my music taste. If a song doesn't capture my attention within the first thirty seconds, I usually skip away, which is honestly kind of harsh on my part. But it was never like that with COIN; I was hooked from the very first note. Something about Chase's voice, and how it blends and layers so well over their beautiful instrumentals... it's hard to put into words. I'm never bored listening to their music, even if it's a song I don't particularly like—there's always something, a bassline or melody or a lyric, that makes me want to scream and sing along.

Chase Lawrence in Atlanta

How is a COIN show more meaningful from other concerts you've been to?

Burnie: I've never seen a band perform with the same energy COIN does. From the second the lights dim and their walk on music starts, to the very last note, it's mesmerizing. All four of them work so well on stage together, completely in sync and having the times of their lives. I live for the glimpses of Ryan's smile when he's playing drums, or when Joe laughs at everyone on barricade for making faces at him. Their passion is exuded through their music, and their performance. Not to mention the way Chase breaks down the boundaries that exist between the barricade and the stage, flinging himself at the audience every chance he gets. This sense of urgency he gives off, this sense of "this show isn't about me, it's about you, all of this is for you," I haven't found it anywhere else. There is no show like a COIN show.

Brittney: COIN never fails to bring a smile to my face during their performance. You can easily tell how happy they are to be on stage performing their music. Every show I've been to, I can easily say how they strive to make everyone feel loved and at home. There's always so much emotion and happiness that you can always feel throughout their performances.

Savannah: There is nothing like a COIN show. Everyone there is family and it really shows. Chase works so hard to make everyone feel so loved and appreciated. Chase is the kindest most incredible person I have ever met and that's a fact. I'm sure he is tired of hearing it by now but I genuinely mean it with every fiber of my being.

Chase Lawrence and Ryan Winnen in Atlanta

How do the band's fan interactions make you feel?

Burnie: Oh, I love them. It's my favorite part of the show. Chase is really good at making you fall in love with him: he dances and jumps across the stage, grabs fans hands and pushes the mic towards the crowd like we're the ones putting on the show. It's these little interactions that make me think of how much they care.

Rachel: The guys really do an incredible job of interacting with their fans. It means so much to me that they continue to come out after shows and talk to as many people as they can. It shows how much they truly care about all of us. They don't have to stay out there late talking to us; they want to and it's amazing.

Chase Lawrence in Atlanta

What is it about a COIN show that gives you a sense of community?

Brittney: The Atlanta show in particular really meant a lot to me. Over the past couple of months, I've been mentally struggling for a lot of different reasons. But getting to come to this show with my best friends and seeing COIN put on yet another incredible show, brings me so much happiness. I've realized how much COIN has truly changed my life for the better, and I'm so beyond thankful for that.

Savannah: A COIN show is home. It doesn't matter what happened that day or any other day - all that matters is that moment and the music.

Burnie: It's the people and our love for the band. There's this phrase that people like to throw around a lot, "home is a COIN show." If any other band were to try and use this phrase, it wouldn't work, and I would honestly snort and dismiss it. But for them, it works. It perfectly describes what it's like to be surrounded by your friends, celebrating the love you have for each other and the music being played. Those few hours I get to spend on barricade, laughing and singing at the top of my lungs, pressed shoulder to shoulder with the people I treasure more than anything else... there's nothing else like. Nothing at all.


COIN's Paradise of Thought tour continues until March 1st. If you missed them at a city near you, don't worry! This summer, they'll be hitting the road with Young the Giant and Fitz and the Tantrums. Buy tickets here.

Keep up with COIN on:

Instagram

Twitter

Facebook

Youtube

Spotify

For the full gallery of photos from this show, click here.

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Dear Taylor Swift, Christians Are Not Homophobic Bigots, Sincerely, The Majority Of Christians

Taylor, you need to calm down when talking about how most Christians act.

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When Taylor Swift released her newest single "You Need to Calm Down" last Friday, I didn't agree with the entire message of the song, mainly because of its heavy political overtones. But as the great Dick Clark once said, "It's got a good beat, and you can dance to it." So, for what it is, it's really easy to dance to this song, and I can see it becoming a pretty big hit.

But then the video came out, and I saw something that really bothered me.

In the music video for "You Need to Calm Down", Taylor is seen partying and hanging out with multiple LGBT+ icons in honor of Pride Month, such as the hosts of Queer Eye, RuPaul, and Ellen Degeneres. There's also a moment with Taylor, dressed as French fries, renewing her friendship with Katy Perry, who's dressed as a hamburger, which is as amazing as it sounds.

However, there's another cast of characters which acts as a foil to the happiness and colorful joy which is taking place in the video. There's a group of protesters surrounding the trailer park where Taylor and all her friends live. They're all dirty, buck-toothed, and dressed like your typical redneck stereotypes. They're also holding up protest signs while screaming at everyone in the trailer park. I saw one of the signs said something about Adam and Eve, and I realized most of the protesters were most likely meant to represent Christians.

And that...didn't sit well with me at all.

I know that these people never explicitly said they were Christians in the video, none of them even wore a cross. But, whenever someone sees anyone protesting rallies and organizations such as Pride, I can guarantee you that most of the time, the first thing people think is that they're from the Westboro Baptist Church, which is notorious for its protests. And I won't lie, there are some Christians who act that way.

But if you haven't heard this yet, let me be the first to tell you that not all Christians act like that. In fact, most of them don't act that way.

Christians don't agree with the LGBT+ lifestyle because of what the apostle Paul wrote in the book of 1 Corinthians (1 Corinthians 6:9-10). However, Jesus never once taught that just because you don't agree with a person doesn't mean they're automatically your enemy (Matthew 5:44). Christians are supposed to represent the love of the Savior of the world, which encompasses every and all aspects of humanity. This definitely includes people whose lifestyles we don't agree with. By not showing love to certain types of people, we are directly going against one of Jesus's greatest commandments.

Not agreeing with people is one of the cornerstones of humanity. It's a divisive world out there to be sure, but that doesn't mean people from any side of the debate need to perpetuate the division. Grouping all Christians into one group of hateful bigots is no different than Christians grouping all the members of the LGBT+ community into one group of evil people. One of the key elements of Christianity is showing people who have different beliefs from us the same love Jesus would show to anyone. And I know I'm not the only Christian who wants to show love to people of all walks of life. I may be the only Jesus they ever see in their lives, and we all wish to express the same love to others.

So Taylor, it looks like you're the one who needs to calm down on this issue.

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The Driver Era Gives Their Everything In Latest Track "Feel You Now"

Listen to The Driver Era open up about the meaning behind their latest track, what it took to produce it, and how they're interacting with fans on tour.

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The Driver Era combines unpredictable sounds across multiple genres with each release. Listeners never know what to expect from brothers Ross and Rocky Lynch because each track is so unique and nuanced. Their latest single "Feel You Now" was released on March 29. If you didn't get a deep enough glimpse into Ross and Rocky's minds in their lyric video, they opened up to Odyssey about what the track means to them from emotional and technical standpoints.

Odyssey: I love the energy that you guys bring to "Feel You Now." How would you say that it's different from the other three songs that The Driver Era has released so far?

Ross Lynch: Oh, it's super different. The first song we released, "Preacher Man," had a more rebellious view. And then following with songs like "Afterglow" and "Low," which have a bit of a sweeter touch – especially in the chord structure. I'd say "Feel You Now" is our most "pop" song that we've released.

Rocky Lynch: Yeah, like, electronic pop.

Ross L: It's definitely got some rock elements too.

O: Oh yeah. It really appeals to everyone in your fanbase. It's definitely pop and upbeat, but also the lyrics are pretty meaningful. So how are you hoping that "Feel You Now" resonates with your listeners, lyrically and musically? What main message do you want people to take away from it?

Ross L: Well, I always like it when the listener interprets songs however it can be the most personal to them. So, however people resonate with the song is it's really up to them because that's how it's going to mean the most to you. But what it means to me is it's about the struggle between your head and your heart – which everyone deals with so often, especially in me. I sometimes get into a spell of overthinking. At the end of the day, the song is about love. That's the message – love over fear.

O: Totally feel you with the whole overthinking thing.

Ross L: It's hard, isn't it?

O: Did you base the lyrics off of your general experiences with the battle between the head and the heart, or was it more from one specific instance?

Ross L: It's a collection of experiences – this song isn't particularly one life occurrence. Typically how we've been writing recently is we've been trying to turn off conscious thought. Without sounding too cheesy, I try to connect to my higher self and just try to let that come through. So with this particular song, it just came out.

O: I feel like that definitely like shows your true, authentic selves. I really appreciate that you're able to get into that realm. Not a lot of artists can do that.

Ross L: Yeah! That's, that's my whole objective. A lot of the greatest songwriters ever said that the meaning of the song would come to them after they wrote the whole song. For instance, John Lennon would say the song writes itself. I am the device that it flows through. That's where "Feel You Now" came from.

O: How do you two balance the songwriting and producing? Is Ross mainly songwriting and Rocky mainly producing?

Rocky L: We go back and forth. Our most common way of making a song is that I'll tend to be a little more production oriented and Ross will tend to do a little more lyric and melody. But if you split us up, we do a little bit of everything. For instance, "Low," our last single, I produced entirely on my own because Ross was in Vancouver filming a Netflix show, like a baller. And then you get to "Feel You Now," and that's a track where we wrote and produced with the drummer Ellington, but the single after that is just Ross and me, and we did the whole thing ourselves. So, it kind of goes back and forth.

O: I like the teamwork element.

Rocky L: Yeah! It just kind of flows like that. It'd be a fun experiment to say, "You know, let's just swap."

Ross L: I would love to do that.

Rocky L: It'd be like, "Ross, sit down at the computer. I'm going to head over to the guitar." We'll float, we do everything. We flip back and forth continuously while writing, and it would be really fun to just be like, "hey, you're only going to touch production and I'm only gonna touch lyric and melody." But that could be a fun thing.

Ross L: I'm surprised we haven't done that.

O: You should totally do it.

Rocky L: We're going to do that now because of you!

O: I'm glad I could inspire you! But yeah, I love the balance. You can really tell listening to your music how well you two work together. How would you say your balance of talents worked together specifically on "Feel You Now?"

Ross L: I think Rocky is a really, really talented musician and engineer. The amount of precision that is in "Feel You Now" a lot of people won't get because they're not musicians. It's really, really precise. He does such a good job about letting the song flow and building it, EQing it just right. And compression and all those little details to such a precise state that the song sounds really crisp. For this particular song, it's what it needed. We had Ellington do a drum pass on the bridge, that's where all that crazy, hectic drumming comes from. All the intense synths and intricacies of the production is just really unique.

Rocky L: I got to start paying him. He's my hype man.

Ross L: I mean, I've said it to Rocky, he said it to me. I don't want to work with anybody else.

O: So you've just started touring…how has it been?

Rocky L: We started on the East Coast and then we spent some time in Colorado, which is where we're originally from.

O: That's awesome! I actually spoke to a couple of the fans that were at your Denver show, but several of your other shows on this tour as well. They said that a Driver Era show really feels like a safe space to them and that each show is very memorable. So how do you go about making sure your live shows are meaningful for fans?

Ross L: Denver is our hometown and after the show, our uncle came backstage – he might be our biggest fan. One of the main things that you said was, "You guys left it all out on the stage." Like all, all of our blood, sweat, tears, energy, everything. We show up and we leave it there. We give it all. I think that's what people really resonate with. Some of our fans have been to 50 of our shows before and they'll follow us on tour, so much so that we know their names and their faces.

O: That's so important. Even just fan interactions, it's so easy to tell how much you guys care about what you do.

Rocky L: That's honestly dope to hear. Because sometimes, you do put in a lot of time, effort, and love to try to dedicate most of your life to something. And it's nice to hear that people see that and feel that as well about a project we've been working on.

To hear "Feel You Now" and other songs live, see when The Driver Era is coming to a city near you. Find tickets here.

Keep up with The Driver Era on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Spotify, and YouTube. Subscribe to their community here.

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