Classes that Should Be Taught in High School

5 Classes They Should Teach You In High School

Stuff that you will actually use in life.

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There are a few things that all of us college students know about high school, either after we graduate or while we are students. High school is boring, tough, and is not the best years of our lives, no matter what our teachers and parents say.

Also, chances are, we aren't going to use anything we learn in high school in our real lives. Especially if we don't like the subject. Like, when are we going to use history in real life, unless you want to be a history teacher or a commentator on National Geographic? And what do you need to use calculus for anyway?

College, while it is difficult and boring, and it does force you to take some classes that have nothing to do with your major and you won't use in real life. At least my school, Drew University, does. However, college has classes that are relevant to my interests, and the outside world. And I think high schools should take notice.

Here are five classes that should be taught in high schools.

1. Finances

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Let's be real, does anyone know how to balance a checkbook? Does anyone know how to pay taxes? Does anyone know how to budget? When I was in middle school, my awesome math teacher did a unit on checkbooks. Unfortunately, we only did that for one week, and I forgot most of what she taught me. I don't see why we can't teach this in high school. It's basic math, and it's easier than most math. Also, this is something we actually can use in real life.

2. Home Economics

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Yeah, I know they used to teach this in school, and still do in some parts. But it's not the staple course that it used to be. I know that it is a bit sexist, appealing mostly to female students, and the photo I chose doesn't help. However, I think this should be a required course. Everyone should know how to take care of their home, and not call their mother when they don't know what to do, as most of us do. I also think this shouldn't just be cooking, it should be laundry, how the basic appliance works, and how to fix things.

3. Technology

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We all know how to do basic things on our electronic devices. But do any of us know how they really work? Or what to do when certain problems arise? We can't just go to Google or to the Apple store every time something goes wrong. It'd be good if we actually knew how our electronics work, or other things we can do with them.

4. Current Events

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We all should know what is happening in the world. Keyword "should." It would be interesting if schools made an entire course dedicated to current events, news, and media, instead of just making it a one-week unit or weekly homework assignment like all of my classes did.

5. Sociology

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If you don't know what this is, it is the study of social interactions and problems. It'd be interesting to learn this in high school where we are trying to find ourselves.

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Hailey Miller's Debut Single Is 'The One'

"The One" is available now across all streaming platforms.

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Being able to blend genres well is a true testament to a great artist, and Hailey Miller has done just that. Breaking onto the pop-country scene with her debut single "The One", the song speaks to the lessons that come out of unfortunate heartbreak, and definitely resonates with people going through one. I got the chance to talk with Hailey about her music, Nashville, and plans for the future:

1. What inspiration did you pull from to write "The One"?

"The One" was inspired by a relationship I was in. It was young love, not the healthiest relationship, and was dragged on for way longer than it should've been. I'd pretty much worked through all the heartbreak by the time it was fully over, and this song felt like the final piece to the puzzle. To acknowledge that some good came from the whole experience, and that lessons were learned. It just kind of poured out of me. It was exactly what I needed at the time. I wrote it and instantly felt peace. Like I could finally let it all go. It's a different kind of breakup anthem, and I hope that people can connect to it in the same way I did.

2. Do you tend to pull from personal experience to write or do you write using a third person perspective?

I definitely prefer to write from personal experience. I've written from a third person perspective, but it always feels more genuine for me to write about things I've been through first hand. It's just easier! It flows better, and feels more honest. Especially if I'm planning on using the song for myself. As an artist, I always want the truths I'm speaking to be genuine. I feel like people connect better that way. If I can't fully connect to the stuff I'm singing, how can I expect the listeners to? Personally, as an artist, the stories behind my songs are just as important to me as the song itself. That being said, if I can connect to someone else's experience deeply, writing third person can be just as fun!

3. What has your experience been like being a woman in the music industry?

You know, I don't have anything negative to say about my experience so far. I've felt respected as an artist from almost everyone I've personally come across in the industry. This being said, I'm very aware of the challenges females tend to face on a larger scale, especially in country. But I try to not let it phase me. In my mind, I'm just an artist…not a "female artist".

4. Growing up in Oregon, what/who inspired you to move to Nashville and write country music?

My earliest inspiration was definitely my aunt. She was singing country music professionally when I was super young, so I grew up seeing that and my family was super good about surrounding me with all sorts of music. My dad had this thing where he would always tell me to "listen to the words" and then at the end of the song I'd have to tell him what I thought it was about. It made me realize at a young age that music isn't just sound, it's stories. I fell in love with country music and its stories. Then came along these powerhouse female singer/songwriters…like Taylor Swift, and that was it. I knew it was something I wanted to do, and I knew Nashville was the place to do it. So, I learned the guitar, taught myself how to write, and made the move as soon as I possibly could! It's pretty much a 19 year old dream in the making at this point.

5. How has Nashville shaped your artistry and/or songwriting since moving there?

Nashville has already shaped my artistry and songwriting immensely. I think the biggest thing is being around so many talented artists and writers. It's super inspiring! Every time I go to a show or writer's round in town, I go home wanting to work even harder. That's the magic about Nashville. In a place where the industry could feel very competitive, the community is so amazing that instead of feeling intimidated, I feel inspired. I think that's so cool. Being able to learn your craft in an environment like that, where everybody is willing to collaborate and learn from each other. There's no room to sit still and not work hard. I think that alone has made me a better artist and writer. I've discovered my own unique writing style and sound, and can't wait to develop it even more.

6. What has your experience been like releasing your first single independently?

It's been amazing! I've had the best time with it. The process was so fun, and such a learning experience. Since it was my first release, I tried to go into it with little to no expectations and I've been blown away! The support I've received is beyond what I ever expected, and people are listening!! That's all I could've ever asked for. I think putting out music for any artist, independent or not, is always a little scary because there's this fear that people won't connect to such a personal part of you. There's so much work behind the scenes that goes into it. But it is so rewarding to read people's messages about how they connect or relate to the song. It's the best feeling in the world!

7. What are your future goals and aspirations within the music industry?

I ultimately just want to keep writing and putting out music that I love, and that other people love. Whether that's on a small scale level, or a larger scale. As long as I'm continuing to make music, I'm happy! That being said, I'd love to do some touring soon, and work towards my first EP/full length album.

8. Do you have plans to release new music soon?

Plans are in the works. I don't have a definitive date for you guys quite yet, but new music is on its way! I've been writing tons and I have some stuff that I'm dying to get out. I'd keep an eye out in the upcoming months for sure.

Listen to "The One" across all streaming platforms now and keep an eye out for future music from Hailey!


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8 Ways To Curve Writer's Block

If you feel that your best work is still in the process of writing or editing, ask for an extension so your article will be at its best.

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1. Write about how you have nothing to write about.

Hence, what I am exactly doing now. Writer's block and loss of motivation is normal for many creators and editors. When individuals read writing tips about having absolutely nothing to create, it can spark an idea and even create some motivation. If you have never heard of Charles Bukowski, (I haven't until right now) he is a poet that once said, "Writing about a writer's block is better than writing nothing at all." The sense of having zero motivation for writing happens all of the time and each creator is bound to hit that point sometime in their career.

2. Identify what is keeping you from writing.

There are a few causes that can accompany writer's block. Cause number one is time. Do not sit down and try to brainstorm at the wrong time when you could be outside taking a walk or hanging out with friends. Random ideas will pop up and if you don't already carry a notebook and pen with you, jot those ideas down in your phone. A simple walk down the block can be your perfect timing. Cause number two is often fear. Fear of how many readers will read your article, who will share it, and what will people think about it. Push it aside and write about what YOU want to write about. There is nothing motivational about making up a story just to reach the word count. It really does not matter what others think, it matters what you think. The last and final cause is perfectionism. Always remember that perfect is the enemy of good. One can never simple be perfect at anything, yet maybe they can master the art of writing but never be perfect.

3. If you can't identify then read other's articles.

I find myself gazing through the New York Times just to spark up an idea that can lead me to an article. Never copying any work, but simply gathering a few details that can turn into something worthy of actually reading. Reading about the National Dog Show can turn into "10 Different Reasons To Always Treat Your Pooch." Reading about a fashion show can transform into "The Best Organic Materials To Look For In Clothing." Ideas are out there, just go searching.

4. Use your own experience.

A bad date? A book you can't seem to finish? Do you hate algebra? All of your experiences are not boring and I am sure some reader out there will appreciate snippets of your life. Who doesn't love reading about a date that went wrong, or the perfect date! Thinking back to some of my best articles, my heartbreak was one of my most popular pieces. Most popular because many can relate. If you share an experience that others can relate to, you'll have a kick ass story.

5. Share the best articles you've ever read and comment on them.

The amount of articles that are truly out there are intense. Guaranteed you will find one idea that can turn into 500 or more words. "The Ultimate Productivity Hack is Saying No", "The Surprising Benefits of Journaling One Sentence Every Day", or "7 Ways to Retain More of Every Book You Read" are simple yet detailed articles to write. Why couldn't you think of any of those topics? Well same, I pulled them off of Best Articles: Over 100 Interesting Articles to Read by James Clear. Check out that article when your writer's block is so strong because out of 100 pieces to write about, you must find something.

6. Don't be afraid to ask for an extension.

If you procrastinate, that's okay because some people get their best work done at the last minute. However, writers have multiple deadlines and drafts they must complete before the final is good to go. Many companies take weeks and weeks to develop a final draft. But if you feel that your best work is still in the process of writing or editing, ask for an extension so your article will be at its best, you'll probably feel better to knowing your absolute finest writing is out there.

7. Pick up what's going on around you.

Society is a broad topic so dig deeper. What's going around town, your college, and on social media? If you take your college newspaper and check out some articles, the little inspiration you had may expand to see the problems going on around you everyday. A newspaper mainly has five categories, news, feature, opinion, arts & entertainment, and sports, Reading a sports article about a student who broke their leg? A broken leg can turn into "How to Care For Your Body During the Season." Taking local problems can expand into huge issues individuals face in everyday life. Always go for detail because each glimpse in someone's life can carry your article.

8. Write about tips.

Tips on how to curve writer's block makes a great article. Tips on how to stay healthy, follow your passion, and how to apply makeup, are all interesting topics. Many individuals don't fully read articles, they skim. For a few quick tips that are an easy read will flow traffic to your page and get you a few clicks.

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