We are all taught that a person who chooses to defend their country legally is a hero. In other words there are several persons considered heroes going against one another, thinking of each other as a villain. As children, we were made to see that military men/women in our country are heroes defending us and that is all there is to it. No one mentioned that each time they leave their families could be the last moment they share together. I don’t remember being told our heroes cry too, when they watch their comrades fall, when they realize they are taking their last breath on a battleground. Most importantly, we were not told that this applies to the military everywhere regardless of the country represented.

I had an eye-opening experience when I read the book “All Quiet on the Western Front.” The book gave a deeper insight into the mental, physical, social stress German military men experienced during World War I. Reading the book, I had to disregard the fact that I belong to a country that stood against Germany; because the German military's personal story could also be the story a United States military man would tell. At the end of the book, the main character, Paul, a man in the military, died and I could not help but question whether he won or lost.

During or after a war, who would you say gained or lost more; the ones who rested, never to reunite with their loved ones, or those who lived to see loved ones while holding onto memories and scars from war?

War is a game of pain with death, one that has no worthy gain. Nevertheless, there are women and men who join the military believing that they are defending their country, representing their country, protecting their country, and that is true. Because of their bravery, heroism, strength...many countries' senses of security are solid and stable. Therefore, to women and men in the military; to those who have rested, those who are traumatized; to those who try to live with their experiences and those who are yet to know where they stand; thank you, for being our hero.