8 Reasons To Go To An In-State College

8 Reasons To Go To An In-State College

As much as out-of-state sounds really fantastic, in-state is just so much better.

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When applying to colleges, a lot of high schoolers dream of going somewhere far away and new, somewhere they can start over, somewhere their parents won't be breathing down their necks. Honestly though, all of that is overrated. Going to a state school is the most thrilling college experience, and here are just some of the reasons why.

1. School spirit

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Although private universities have a lot of school spirit, no one loves their university more than state school students. They're proud of their respective schools because college, to them, represents more than just a certain demographic of academics, sports, or other activities. State schools are a diverse cross section of their states, and the diversity that they encourage is what people are so enthusiastic to convey.

2. Easy laundry access

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You were probably really excited to move away from home and start living the life of a free ,independent adult. What you didn't expect was just how much laundry costs would add up on your journey to "adulthood." There's something really convenient and amazing about living close enough to home that laundry costs are never an issue.

3. You're used to the (probably terrible) weather

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No one likes change, and whether you're more used to the clear blue skies of California or the shifting seasons of Maryland, you probably prefer your own state's weather to that of others. You know what to expect, and you've got a whole wardrobe to suit your university needs.

4. Forgetting stuff at home is no problem

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Move in day is stressful enough, but adding on the possibility of forgetting something key that you have no way of getting is even worse. Going out-of-state means a long road trip or plane ride to and from campus, and you have to fit everything in either one car, or worse, a couple suitcases. Attending an in-state school means you've got constant access to all of the belongings you left behind at home, no matter if you've got room for them on the very first trip to college.

5. Easy grocery access

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Once you're living in your own apartment in college, you may realize that grocery shopping in college sucks. You probably don't have a car, so you have to carry your groceries yourself, and you don't have money, so you don't have anything to actually by groceries with as it is. Instead, as an in-state student, you get the luxury of going home, buying cheaper, better groceries, and transporting them back to your apartment with ease. How great is that?

6. You may already know some people at school before it even starts

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Sure, high school kind of sucked, I know. Still, college is scary, and it might be nice to know a friendly face or two. That's in no way an excuse to sit in your room and avoid new experiences, but it is a reassurance that everything will ultimately be okay.

7. In-state tuition

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This one speaks for itself. Who doesn't love lower prices? Out-of-state may be exciting in some ways, but the money you'll save going in-state is ultimately going to help you if you want to study abroad, take a gap year, or go to grad/law/med school.

8. Home is always close-by

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As much as no one wants to admit it, we miss home. College is fun, but nothing compares to the feel of your own bed, your own family, your own pets. There are some things that your poster-studded dorm room will never replace, and those things are never far when you go to school in-state.

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I Spent Most Of My Childhood Obsessing Over My Hair

How a terrible haircut grew into a shallow obsession with deep roots (pun intended).

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I spent seven years of my life dreading every haircut. I spent seven years asking my hairdressers for "just a tiny trim off the tips". I would cringe anytime a class craft called for using scissors, terrified that someone would somehow miss their paper and chop off a chunk of my locks. I was ridiculously paranoid, even afraid that someone would try to sabotage me by attacking my hair (which, by the way, was not altogether delusional as one of my friends confessed to me last year that in middle school she did make a plot to put Nair in my shampoo. I'm talking to you, Anna Jones). Ever since a dreadful haircut in fourth grade, I was traumatized.

Little Laurel at her 13th birthday, with a big yellow flower on top of her head. Laurel Hecht

I knew, deep down, that this fear was pretty frivolous and shallow. It was ridiculous for me to place such importance on the state of my hair. It still sounds ridiculous when I think back to those feelings. But they were really intense feelings. Feeling really embarrassed when my fourth-grade friends wore their hair in braids or pigtails and mine couldn't reach anymore. Feeling like I had lost all girly-ness and beauty just because my hair wasn't long and flowing.

When I first cut my hair into that tragic, and (now) laughable style, my feelings of being less pretty translated into feeling less valuable. Somehow, losing ten inches of hair caused my worth to plummet.

By high school, my hair was down to my hips. I was not really afraid of getting it cut anymore, but it had just become a part of my identity. I was known for my long hair. I am a relatively reserved person, I don't like attention in unknown situations or when I'm in big groups. I tend to lay pretty low. My hair became a source of comfort, almost like I was hiding behind long, dark curtains of hair.

Anyways, I realized this weird strategy and attachment to my hair that developed and started planning out a time to chop my hair off during my junior year. The horrible haircut was years ago when I was but a child. It was time to get over myself and just cut off my hair, conquer my fears and move on.

We love a good freshman year car selfie, proudly showing off the long hair and braces.Laurel Hecht

I told myself that when I got my braces off, THAT is when I will finally get over this whole hair thing and will chop my hair off and lose the metal teeth, and emerge a woman. However, the braces came and went, and I told myself it just wasn't a good time.

Then, I said I would cut my hair short right before college. I would graduate from high school, move out of my house, chop off my hair and emerge a new woman!! However, graduation came and went and next thing I knew I was a freshman in college still clinging to the comfort of my long hair.

An evolved senior year car selfie, but still a car selfie nonetheless. Laurel Hecht

Basically, I kept putting it off. I was older and knew very well that I had so much more worth than just my dumb looks. Still, though, deep down, I was scared that I would cut off two feet of hair just to be left feeling like the sad, shy nine-year-old again. I kept planning then putting off my big haircut until this dramatic saga finally came to an end with a random haircut in Europe.

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5 Stories That Shook America in 2018

It's been a long year. These stories prove that.

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Now that 2018 is officially over, we can look back on the year's most significant ups and downs and reflect on what's to come next. This year saw the emergence of two large-scale movements that broke down barriers and shook up society, increased our understanding of social media's implications, and revealed the troubling extent of America's immigration crisis. The following five news stories were some of the most covered national events of 2018. Each reflect the tumultuous, eye-opening, inspiring year 2018 has been.

Facebook's Mishandling of User Data

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before Congress in April.

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This social media giant has long been the target of government criticism, but its troubles seemed to peak last year in March. That's when federal regulators began to investigate Facebook's mishandling of user data in connection with the 2016 presidential campaign. The Federal Trade Commission's investigation came in response to reports that political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica had improperly gained access to 50 million users' information, and exploited this information in Trump's favor during the election. Since then, Facebook's stock value has plummeted, and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has launched an aggressive apology campaign. In April, he appeared before an unforgiving Congress to answer questions about Facebook's lacking privacy policies. The company's repeated failures to protect user data will most likely lead to stronger federal regulations come 2019.

March For Our Lives

Emma Gonzalez, a Parkland survivor and one of the movement's organizers, speaks at the March For Our Lives in Washington, D.C.

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On February 14, 2018, seventeen students and teachers were killed in a mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Days after the tragedy, Parkland students flooded major TV networks demanding gun control. The March For Our Lives movement was created by a group of MSD juniors and seniors with the goal of rallying their generation for gun reform, in the hopes that one day school shootings would be a thing of the past. One month later, over 2,000 schools participated in a nationwide walkout to mark the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting. Ten days after that, millions gathered in Washington D.C. to march in solidarity with the students of MSD and send a message to lawmakers. As many of these students reach voting age in the coming year, it will be interesting to see how politicians respond to their demands, and the gun control legislation that will follow.

Family Separation 

A portrait of Felipe Alonzo-Gomez, the second Guatemalan child to die in U.S. Border Patrol custody following implementation of the "zero-tolerance" immigration policy.

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The Trump Administration's family separation policy at the border, first practiced in October, is perhaps the most controversial act thus far by one of the most controversial presidents. On April 6, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the "zero-tolerance" immigration policy that would soon separate thousands of children, and many infants, from their parents as they reached the United States. Unsurprisingly, the American public reacted swiftly and angrily to the policy, and their outrage peaked in June when photos of children held in cages began circling the internet. Judges have ordered that the Department of Homeland Security reunite separated families, but the agency has failed to reach two different deadlines, and as of three months ago as many as 200 children remain in government custody. With recent reports that two Guatemalan children have died in Border Patrol custody, this tragic issue won't be going away in 2019.

#MeToo

Actress Ashley Judd, who became one of the first women in Hollywood to accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault in a 2017 New York Times exposé.

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The #MeToo movement began in late 2017 when a New York Times exposé featured firsthand accounts from several women accusing Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault. As more and more men were forced to step down from powerful positions, Alyssa Milano coined the hashtag "MeToo" to represent victims of sexual assault, and hence the movement began. The following months saw the creation of the Time's Up coalition, the record-breaking second annual Women's March, the testimony of Christine Blasey Ford, and the imprisonment of Weinstein, Bill Cosby, and Larry Nassar. This movement, which took hold over not only Hollywood, but each profession, has brought permanent change to the country as women gain more seats in office and more representation in media. #MeToo has set the precedent for future steps toward gender equality in 2019.

Brett Kavanaugh Confirmation Hearing

Dr. Christine Blasey Ford prepares to testify in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee in October.

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Publicized by the #MeToo movement and defined by the political loyalties of skeptical conservatives, Supreme Court judge Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings kept the nation on edge for two weeks in mid-October. The reason: Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, a California professor, appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee and alleged that Kavanaugh had sexually assaulted her at a party when they were in high school. The poise with which Ford presented her testimony, contrasted with the emotional turbulence that characterized Kavanaugh's defense, both moved and shocked the many Americans who watched the hearings unfold live on television. After an initial delay, the confirmation vote proceeded, and Kavanaugh was appointed to the Supreme Court on a narrow 50-48 vote split along party lines. To many, Kavanaugh's confirmation symbolized just how much progress the United States has yet to make in its treatment of sexual assault victims, and how little the nation has changed since Anita Hill testified against then-nominee Clarence Thomas in 1991.

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