Giving In The Midst Of Loss

Giving In The Midst Of Loss

In the midst of the damage left by Hurricane Irma in Puerto Rico, Puerto Ricans have come together.
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On Wednesday this past week, we saw Hurricane Irma swipe through Puerto Rico. As a category 5 hurricane, the highest in the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale, and almost as big as the state of Texas, Hurricane Irma possed a real and powerful threat to the 3.7 million people who live in Puerto Rico.

According to reports, over 1 million people on the island were left without electricity, over 55,000 had no running water, and only about 40 percent of hospitals were able to continue operations, in addition to local damages and flooding. Much is still left to do in disaster relief efforts, but we are grateful for all the help we have received and proud of the help we are giving.

Immediate Help

Free meals for those helping with disaster relief. The Governor of Puerto Rico, Ricardo Roselló, and the Association of Restaurants of the island agreed to provide meals free of charge to those people who decided to aid in disaster relief efforts.

Temporary suspension of IVU tax, the main federal tax in the island (11.5%), on prepared goods. Governor Ricardo Roselló stated the measure was made, "to make sure families have greater access to food".

AT&T sent out this message to help Puerto Ricans communicate during such an important time.

Krispy Kreme donated hundreds of donuts to the Governor Ricardo Roselló, to pass on to those helping with disaster relief.



U.S. Government Help

President Trump has authorized funds for FEMA to coordinate in relief efforts on the island:

"Today, President Donald J. Trump declared that an emergency exists in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and ordered Federal assistance to supplement Commonwealth and local response efforts due to the emergency conditions resulting from Hurricane Irma beginning on September 5, 2017, and continuing."

Temporary suspension of the Jones Act. Elaine Duke, Security Acting Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, approved a seven-day waiver of the Jones Act. This waiver was issued to ensure that , “all options are available to distribute fuel to states and territories impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, both historic storms.”

Aid to Neighboring Islands

In the midst of the damage left by Hurricane Irma, Puerto Ricans decided to send supplies and personnel to the islands of the Antilles and U.S. Virgin Islands to aid in their disaster relief efforts.

Even though 40 percent of hospitals on the island were operating due to generators after Irma, "The British Virgin Islands, just east of Puerto Rico, saw extensive damage and was sending some of its injured to two Puerto Rico hospitals".

Also, thousands in Puerto Rico have gathered supplies during the days following Irma to send to the islands most affected. Groups are preparing to go and some are already in these places assisting with disaster relief.


Here are videos of people in Puerto Rico rallying to help each other and to help those in the nearing islands:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1922822811318744/p...



Cover Image Credit: El Nuevo Dia

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A Senior's Last Week Of High School

The bittersweet end.
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Well, this is it. This is what we've worked so hard the last four years - who am I kidding - basically what seems like our whole lives for. This is the very last week we will set foot as a student in our high school's hallways. As most schools are getting ready to set their seniors free at last, it all begins to set in - the excitement, the anxiousness, and also the sentiment and nostalgia.

For seniors, the years since our first day as a freshman at the bottom of the high school totem pole have seemed endless, but as we look back on these last few weeks, we realize that this year in particular has gone by extraordinarily fast. It was just yesterday that we were sitting in our classrooms for the very first time, going to our 'last first' practice, and getting our first taste of the (very real) "senioritis". With all that's going on in our lives right now, from sports and clubs, finals, and the sought after graduation ceremony, it's hard to really sit down and think about how our lives are all about to become drastically different. For some it's moving out, and for some it's just the thought of not seeing your best friend on the way to fourth period English; either way, the feels are real. We are all in a tug of war with the emotions going on inside of us; everything is changing - we're ready, but we're not.

THE GOOD. Our lives are about to begin! There is a constant whirlwind of excitement. Senior awards, getting out of school early, parties, and of course Graduation. We are about to be thrust into a world of all new things and new people. Calling our own shots and having the freedom we have so desperately desired since the teenage years began is right around the corner. Maybe the best part is being able to use these new things surrounding you to grow and open your mind and even your heart to ideas you never could before. We get the chance to sink or swim, become our own person, and really begin to find ourselves.

Things we don't even know yet are in the works with new people we haven't even met yet. These friendships we find will be the ones to last us a lifetime. The adventures we experience will transform into the advice we tell our own children and will become the old tales we pass down to our grandkids when they come to visit on the weekends. We will probably hate the all night study sessions, the intensity of finals week, and the overpowering stress and panic of school in general, just like we did in high school... But it will all be worth it for the memories we make that will outlive the stress of that paper due in that class you absolutely hate. As we leave high school, remember what all the parents, teachers, coaches, and mentors are telling you - this are the best times of our lives!

THE BAD. The sentimental emotions are setting in. We're crying, siblings are tearing up, and parents are full-out bawling. On that first day, we never expected the school year to speed by the way it did. Suddenly everything is coming to an end. Our favorite teachers aren't going to be down the hall anymore, our best friends probably won't share a class with us, we won't be coming home to eat dinner with our families...

We all said we wanted to get out of this place, we couldn't wait, we were ready to be on our own; we all said we wouldn't be "so emotional" when the time came, but yet here we are, wishing we could play one more football game with our team or taking the time to make sure we remember the class we liked the most or the person that has made us laugh even when we were so stressed we could cry these past few years. Take the time to hug your parents these last few months. Memorize the facial expressions of your little sister or brother. Remember the sound of your dad coming home from work. These little things we take for granted every day will soon just be the things we tell our college roommate when they ask about where we're from. As much as we've wanted to get out of our house and our school, we never thought it would break our heart as much as it did. We are all beginning to realize that everything we have is about to be gone.

Growing up is scary, but it can also be fun. As we take the last few steps in the hallways of our school, take it all in. Remember, it's okay to be happy; it's okay to be totally excited. But also remember it's okay to be sad. It's okay to be sentimental. It's okay to be scared, too. It's okay to feel all these confusing emotions that we are feeling. The best thing about the bittersweet end to our high school years is that we are finally slowing down our busy lives enough to remember the happy memories.

Try not to get annoyed when your mom starts showing your baby pictures to everyone she sees, or when your dad starts getting aggravated when you talk about moving out and into your new dorm. They're coping with the same emotions we are. Walk through the halls remembering the classes you loved and the classes you hated. Think of the all great times that have happened in our high school years and the friends that have been made that will never be forgotten. We all say we hated school, but we really didn't. Everything is about to change; that's a happy thing, and a sad thing. We all just have to embrace it! We're ready, but we're not...

Cover Image Credit: Facebook

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You're Not Crazy, Your Seasonal Allergies ARE Worse Than They Normally Are

Between all of these symptoms, I've felt miserable the last week.

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We've all been waiting for summer to come, and it's finally on its way. I started putting away my jackets and heavy clothes, and I'm so excited to take out my dresses and bathing suits. Classes are ending for students and we can start the beach trips on these warm, sunny days. What could possibly be wrong with summer coming?

If you have seasonal allergies, specifically to pollen and tree-related allergens, you may be in for a real problem.

In certain states, especially in the northern and eastern US areas, the pollen count is at drastically high levels. So much so that people with only minimal seasonal allergies are having intense reactions, and people who didn't even know they had allergies are having their first reactions.

I've only ever had an itchy nose when seasons change, and only when standing in the middle of lots of plants that would aggravate it. I never suspected my allergies would be making me so sick right now until my physician told me what's going on with this season's allergens.

Since the pollen levels are so dramatic in New York right now, I've had sinus congestion so bad it turned into sinusitis, and a sore throat so swollen and painful I swore it had to be strep. The sinusitis was giving me fevers, aches, and chills, making me feel like I had the flu — all of this traced back to allergies. Between all of these symptoms, I've felt miserable the last week.

Once I started asking around about what my doctor said, several people have told me they're having the same problem with their allergies now. If you're suspicious you may have allergies, get tested and ask your doctor's opinion. It's best to be well-informed on your medical issues so that you'll be prepared if a bad allergy season comes along (like this summer).

If you want to know what the pollen count looks like in your area, go to Pollen.com and allow access to your location — it'll show you a map of the states and their current pollen levels, as well as a specific analysis of the town you live.

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