Out of every 1,000 rapes, only 334 are reported -- leaving 666 victims to suffer in utter solitude. 666 women who are the byproduct of a criminal justice system that has turned its back on them.

Of the 334 reported rapes, only 63 lead to an arrest -- leaving 271 victims with an overwhelming sense of betrayal as those sworn to protect them fail to do so.

Of the 63 arrests, only 13 will be prosecuted -- leaving 50 victims feeling as if their confession would have been better off stifled and suppressed.

Of the 13 cases prosecuted, seven will lead to a conviction -- leaving six victims feeling as if their battle was not worth fighting after all.

And of the seven convictions, only six rapists will be incarcerated -- leaving one victim and a world population of 7.4 billion with the crippling fear that they must now share their planet with a convicted rapist.

On average, 293,066 people are raped a year in the United States, which means that 291,308 rapists live amongst us, free of shackles and orange jump-suits.

Of those rapists that were convicted, 60 percent of them will commit new crimes following their release (up to five years afterward).

Out of every 1,000 convicted rapists, 510 of those rapists maintain one or more prior rape convictions.

This means that rapists are not one-time offenders, therefore they cannot be trusted to coexist in society. Yet our criminal justice system neglects to incarcerate them time and time again, leaving the public at risk for future offenses, and leaving the victim toll to rise, instead of decrease.

And what do we do to combat these risks? We teach women to show less skin, to drink less, to guard their drinks, to avoid parties, to stay inside our locked bedrooms, sheathed in turtle necks. We teach victims that the crimes maliciously perpetrated upon them were their fault, and their fault alone. We place the blame on those who have been violated, and not on those who did the violating. We teach victims that their testimonies will go unheard and disbelieved. We teach victims that unconsciousness and intoxication automatically equates to consent. We teach victims that the crimes preformed upon them are not crimes at all.

We blame "party culture" and launch campaigns geared toward teaching women the dangers of excessive drinking.

We teach women that if they drink too much, they become an object. That the second their bloodstream is awash with alcohol they become less than human, that they become something to be used, abused, and violated.

We perpetrate the idea that unconsciousness and silence automatically equate to consent; that the lack of consent is invariably consent itself.

We don't punish, at least not those who deserve it anyway.

So yeah, we should be outraged by Brock Turner's embarrassingly short six month sentence for rape. But when our anger towards Brock subsides, as it inevitably will, we should remember the 291,308 rapists who never saw the inside of a jail cell. We should remember their victims, and the justice they never received. The anger we are feeling right now must linger with us, because this issue is much larger than a privileged white boy getting a short sentence. Brock Turner granted America with a small glimpse inside the inter-workings of a failed criminal justice system, but in reality, he merely skimmed the surface.

Brock Turner may have only received a six month sentence, but that's six more months than 291,308 rapists.

However, six months is not nearly enough, and we shouldn't settle for that. But if we sit idly by, while sexual assaults are disregarded and reduced to "minor indiscretions" and "lapses of judgment," we allow this behavior to flourish. We allow the rapists to win.

This year tens of thousands of people will be raped. Let's not let Brock Turner be the only rapist who attracts our outrage.