8 Mistakes Auburn Freshmen Always Make, Without Fail
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Freshman

8 Mistakes Auburn Freshmen Always Make, Without Fail

You do NOT want to be guilty of #6.

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8 Mistakes Auburn Freshmen Always Make, Without Fail
Anna Solomonik

With the summer coming to a close, the anxiety of incoming freshmen heightens. You wonder if you've bought enough stuff for your dorm, you worry that you won't have enough room to fit all the things you bought for your dorm, and there's always that thought in the back of your head, wondering if you'll be "freshmeat" to the upperclassmen all over again. While they might not look down on you as much as they did in high school, here are a few mistakes you need to know to avoid making yourself look like a total noob.

Only studying 1-2 days prior to a test.

We're all guilty of this one. The first test of freshman year is always a slap to the face because freshmen aren't accustomed to the vigorous studying that has to come before a test. They think, "I usually studied the night before a test in high school and did just fine, so if I start studying two days before a test I should be good." Nope. Professors know that freshmen don't prepare enough for their first test, but that doesn't mean they make it any easier. Use it as a learning experience to figure out what study habits work best for you (obviously not this one).

Doing laundry on Sundays.

Ahhh, Sundays, the day everyone collectively decides to get their crap together. The library is packed, Starbucks is sold out of venti cups, and freshmen migrate to the laundry rooms. It's annoying enough to have to break a $20 just to get quarters for the washing machine, but nothing is more frustrating than finding all the washers full with damp clothes, ready to be dried with no one around to pick them up. My best advice is to do laundry on Saturday morning when everyone's asleep till noon recovering from the night before.

Bringing every single thing on those online packing lists.

Universities don't release packing lists for a reason, because everything on those lists is basically useless after the first month. You're not gonna keep up with filling your Brita water filter, you'll probably just end up buying water bottles at the C-store. You'll most likely only use your mini ironing board once until you realize its pointless since everyone wears their clothes wrinkly anyway. Figure out the things you use on a daily basis at home, and only bring the necessities.

Going home every weekend.

This might seem tempting, especially after the homesickness kicks in, but you can never fully adjust to college if you're spending every weekend with your parents. Don't get me wrong, there's nothing wrong with seeing your parents while in college, just limit the contact to once or twice a month in order to make friends and feel comfortable being away from home.

Never utilizing the library until finals week.

The library is basically my home now, but nothing is more frustrating than not being able to find a table during finals week because they're all filled with freshmen trying to cram a semesters worth of information in a week. The library is always there, 24-7, but people forget how useful it is until the last week of the semester. Work as hard as you work for finals week every time you have a test. It'll make the stress of finals week a little less since you'll already have a grade you're comfortable with and won't be killing yourself for an A on the final in order to pass the class.

Wearing your favorite shoes to a frat party/downtown.

Even if you're wearing the cutest dress known to man that goes with nothing but your OTBTs, you're gonna have to sacrifice the outfit and switch out those wedges for converse if you want your shoes to survive. Between drinks getting spilled and people stepping on your feet, you're gonna be saying goodbye to the $125 you spent on those shoes. Bring an old pair of converse or vans with you to college that you wouldn't mind getting a little dirty.

Only studying with friends.

Studying with your friends sounds like a good idea until you find yourself gossiping and watching youtube videos, getting nothing productive done. Lots of freshmen are scared to go to the library alone but don't be. A good 90% of people there are studying alone, and you'll get waaay more done this way, giving you time to hang with your friends after.

Not going to the UPC events.

Welcome week is when UPC throws the biggest events of the year, such as Paradise on the Plains, Aubie Fest, and the Gameday Experience. These events are held to welcome you to campus, so take advantage of all the free things they have to offer! Free food, free games, and most importantly, free T-shirts. Don't miss out on these events because you're nervous to go to things alone (like I was), this is a perfect opportunity to make friends and get to know the campus a little better.

Freshman year is a rollercoaster, but hopefully knowing these few things to avoid will make it a little easier. Good luck and welcome to Auburn!

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This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.
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