The 7 Days Of Dead Week, According To Nick Miller

The 7 Days Of Dead Week, According To Nick Miller

"I'm not a successful adult!"
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The week in between regular classes and finals is a strange twilight zone to navigate through but no one could help you see the roadmap of the week like Nick Miller, who is used to living in the twilight zone between total denial and complete chaos.

1. Monday

You basically forget about all the stress that's about to come for you.

2. Tuesday

You're still feeling OK, still feeling like you have lots of time.

3. Wednesday

It's a weird gray area of not being ready for anything and not being close enough to really panic yet.

4. Thursday

You start working on your final papers, you've got it, no problem.

5. Friday

Oh wow. Finals start Monday, but it's your last weekend of the semester, you try to enjoy yourself.

6. Saturday

Finals are Monday! Go to the library! You can't find a seat! Everyone else is at the library too!

7. Sunday

One day left until the first day of finals. If you're a freshman it's kind of like the apocalypse. If you're a senior you're probably clicking through this article shrugging at the panic.

Cover Image Credit: FOX

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Sorry Not Sorry, My Parents Paid For My Coachella Trip

No haters are going to bring me down.
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This piece is intended to be a satire of an experience at Coachella.

With Coachella officially over, lives can go back to normal and we can all relive Beyonce’s performance online for years to come. Or, if you were like me and actually there, you can replay the experience in your mind for the rest of your life, holding dear to the memories of an epic weekend and a cultural experience like no other on the planet.

And I want to be clear about the Beyonce show: it really was that good.

But with any big event beloved by many, there will always be the haters on the other side. The #nochella’s, the haters of all things ‘Chella fashion. And let me just say this, the flower headbands aren’t cultural appropriation, they’re simply items of clothing used to express the stylistic tendency of a fashion-forward event.

Because yes, the music, and sure, the art, but so much of what Coachella is, really, is about the fashion and what you and your friends are wearing. It's supposed to be fun, not political! Anyway, back to the main point of this.

One of the biggest things people love to hate on about Coachella is the fact that many of the attendees have their tickets bought for them by their parents.

Sorry? It’s not my fault that my parents have enough money to buy their daughter and her friends the gift of going to one of the most amazing melting pots of all things weird and beautiful. It’s not my fault about your life, and it’s none of your business about mine.

All my life, I’ve dealt with people commenting on me, mostly liking, but there are always a few that seem upset about the way I live my life.

One time, I was riding my dolphin out in Turks and Cacaos, (“riding” is the act of holding onto their fin as they swim and you sort of glide next to them. It’s a beautiful, transformative experience between human and animal and I really think, when I looked in my dolphin’s eye, that we made a connection that will last forever) and someone I knew threw shade my way for getting to do it.

Don’t make me be the bad guy.

I felt shame for years after my 16th birthday, where my parents got me an Escalade. People at school made fun of me (especially after I drove into a ditch...oops!) and said I didn’t deserve the things I got in life.

I can think of a lot of people who probably don't deserve the things in life that they get, but you don't hear me hating on them (that's why we vote, people). Well, I’m sick of being made to feel guilty about the luxuries I’m given, because they’ve made me who I am, and I love me.

I’m a good person.

I’m not going to let the Coachella haters bring me down anymore. Did my parents buy my ticket and VIP housing? Yes. Am I sorry about that? Absolutely not.

Sorry, not sorry!

Cover Image Credit: Kaitlin Harasta

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What To Expect For Big Lecture Classes

Don't be afraid, you'll survive these classes.
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I’m about to finish my first year of college once spring quarter is over, and I’ve already been able to experience classes of many sizes, ranging from 13 students to a little under 500.

Thankfully, my larger lectures have been taught mostly by energetic and passionate professors, which I deem as a key quality needed in a great class. Especially for these larger scaled classes, it’s much easier for students to fall off track quicker when the ratio of student to teacher increases.

Student engagement is critical in lectures because the more students are able to participate, the more they can keep focused. In a 400 student class, I had the professor keep the class interesting and persuasive by using memes and gifs throughout his lessons, as well as debatable questions to be consulted with your peers. There were also videos that resonated with today’s media society, all surrounding and relating to the important material kept on a PowerPoint presentation.

Another professor I had read off his already indistinguishable PowerPoint and, occasionally mapped out problems on the chalkboard. Almost one-third of the class dropped within the first week.

Now, this isn’t to scare you away from these large-scale classes. If the professor is worth their dime, they’ll know how to engage the class, and as long as you put in the required effort as well, you’ll have no problem adjusting to the larger class setting.

Remember, the main goal is engagement and participation, even if it’s not to the whole class or to the professor themselves. Don’t be discouraged by the numbers, there are many ways to seek independent help as well if you feel that you’re struggling.

Cover Image Credit: YouTube

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