I'm A College Student Who Is Against Free Tuition

I'm A College Student Who Is Against Free Tuition

Why Paying For College Isn't A Burden
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I worked hard throughout high school to get good grades, to get into college, and to get my tuition paid for. That discipline was my first experience of the "real world." At some point in your life, everything stops getting handed to you. You have to work for the things you want. Either paying out of pocket for your college education or having it paid for by the scholarships you've received, you appreciate college and value your time and money. College is a privilege.

College is a transition and preparation for a career and life itself. How can you be expected to work hard in your career if you can't work hard for everything leading up to that career?

It is stressful to know that if I fail a test and don't meet my GPA requirements, that I will ultimately lose my scholarships. However, that stress motivates me to work hard. I'm constantly studying so that I can achieve my career goals. I'm working hard for what I want.

I want to succeed.

Of course I would in a sense love for my tuition to be paid for, but I don't view it as a burden. I view it as taking initiative to achieve my goals. Nothing is free and college happens to be something that isn't.

I never asked my parents to pay for me to go to college. I made sure that I would study hard to get good enough grades to receive enough scholarships. I decided not to attend the most expensive school in the state, and with working as hard as I did in high school, I should receive a degree in four years, debt free.

Recently Fox News Reporter, Neil Cavuto, interviewed a young woman, Keely Mullen, who was a Million Student March organizer. Keely discussed her demands for free college tuition and an increase in minimum wage.

When approached with the question on how nationwide college tuition should be paid for, Keely proposed that those with the most wealth in the country should pay higher taxes. She describes the 1% of the United States, that is the overall wealthiest, as hoarders.

"If you’re willing to work hard, it doesn’t matter who you are or where you come from or what you look like or where you live. It doesn’t matter whether you’re black or white, or Hispanic or Asian, or Native American, or young or old, or rich or poor, able, disabled, gay or straight. You can make it here in America if you’re willing to try.” -President Obama

A college degree is earned, not handed to you.

Cover Image Credit: http://ualr.edu/about/

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I'm A Woman And You Can't Convince Me Breastfeeding In Public Is OK In 2019

Sorry, not sorry.

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Lately, I have seen so many people going off on social media about how people shouldn't be upset with mothers breastfeeding in public. You know what? I disagree.

There's a huge difference between being modest while breastfeeding and just being straight up careless, trashy and disrespectful to those around you. Why don't you try popping out a boob without a baby attached to it and see how long it takes for you to get arrested for public indecency? Strange how that works, right?

So many people talking about it bring up the point of how we shouldn't "sexualize" breastfeeding and seeing a woman's breasts while doing so. Actually, all of these people are missing the point. It's not sexual, it's just purely immodest and disrespectful.

If you see a girl in a shirt cut too low, you call her a slut. If you see a celebrity post a nude photo, you call them immodest and a terrible role model. What makes you think that pulling out a breast in the middle of public is different, regardless of what you're doing with it?

If I'm eating in a restaurant, I would be disgusted if the person at the table next to me had their bare feet out while they were eating. It's just not appropriate. Neither is pulling out your breast for the entire general public to see.

Nobody asked you to put a blanket over your kid's head to feed them. Nobody asked you to go feed them in a dirty bathroom. But you don't need to basically be topless to feed your kid. Growing up, I watched my mom feed my younger siblings in public. She never shied away from it, but the way she did it was always tasteful and never drew attention. She would cover herself up while doing it. She would make sure that nothing inappropriate could be seen. She was lowkey about it.

Mindblowing, right? Wait, you can actually breastfeed in public and not have to show everyone what you're doing? What a revolutionary idea!

There is nothing wrong with feeding your baby. It's something you need to do, it's a part of life. But there is definitely something wrong with thinking it's fine to expose yourself to the entire world while doing it. Nobody wants to see it. Nobody cares if you're feeding your kid. Nobody cares if you're trying to make some sort of weird "feminist" statement by showing them your boobs.

Cover up. Be modest. Be mindful. Be respectful. Don't want to see my boobs? Good, I don't want to see yours either. Hard to believe, I know.

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Thanks To Harry Potter, I Graduated With Honors

Never judge a book by its cover.

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For as long as I can remember, Harry Potter has been a part of my life.

I can remember being tiny and sitting in front of the TV and being mesmerized by the antics of Harry, Ron, and Hermoine. The second one, “The Chamber of Secrets" was always my favorite. Mainly because of the giant snake.

I never knew they were books until I was on a cruise to Mexico when I was four and my older cousin was reading one of the later books (I believe it was “The Order of the Phoenix" yet, I can't remember exactly). As soon as I knew they were books, I wanted to read them.

However, I was a fairly slow reader in my youth. I can remember being in first grade and only reading one book the entire year, while the other kids had three or four books on their belt. I felt out of place because school put me in a specialized reading group with all the other kids who were struggling to read. Yet, every time I walked past the Harry Potter books in the library, I would tap them and think, “one day."

In second grade, I was still fairly behind in reading in contrast to my fellow peers. There was a volunteer, a sweet, older woman with curly, grey-white hair, who would read with me every Thursday. We read a bunch of different things and would never judge me for saying a word wrong or stumbling through a sentence. One day after we read a particularly long story, she asked me, "what's your book goal or book series goal?"

I felt my eyes drifting over to where the Harry Potter books across the library. She followed my line of sight and smiled when she realized what I was looking at. "Harry Potter," she stated, "those are fifth and sixth-grade reading level books." I nodded, slightly embarrassed that I would even think about reading such books with such a high reading level. She must have noticed my cheek flare red because the next thing she said was, "Well, I believe you can do it. Maybe in a few years, but you'll get there."

I can distinctly remember the smile spread across my face when I returned to class.

The next year, in third grade, I remember my teacher telling me that the sweet, older woman who had helped and believed in me had died of a stroke. That day I picked up the first Harry Potter book and started reading.

I struggled through it, I didn't know much of the vocabulary, especially the British vocabulary and phrases. However, I could see my reading comprehension increasing. I graduated from the extra reading classes I had to do, my reading comprehension tests sky-rocketed, and by fourth grade, I was the number one reader in the class.

I credit the Harry Potter series with helping me get to where I am today. They helped me to realize that books weren't actually boring, but adventurous and interesting. Harry Potter turned me into an avid reader, which helped me to graduate High School with honors.

Today, when I put on my "Gryffindor" hat or when I log onto my computer and see my wallpaper, I can't help but think back to second grade and my time spent with the sweet older woman. Each time, I can picture her smile and her telling me she believed in me, which is enough to help me get through any day.

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