Breakup Letter To March In Cuse

A Breakup Letter To March In Cuse: You Did Us All Dirty With The Weather

Bring on the April Showers

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Dear March in Cuse,

I wanted to start by saying thank you for endless hail, freezing rain, and crazy winds this past March. It was all so appreciated. We started the month on March 1st with a whopping low of 9 degrees! Love that. I just have to say, weather averaging in the 30s and 40s all month was not cool. It was March, spring was coming. We all wanted to wear our cute trendy spring clothes and play frisbee on the quad. We wanted to be outside, to breathe fresh air, but it didn't happen like that. Instead, everyone was bundled up in their Canada goose jackets and snow boots. If you dared, you could go out without a scarf covering your face, but be prepared for endless dry skin. Coming back after spring break felt like getting pelted in the face with a snowball. All in all,

it was a bad time for all of us.

Nobody deserves to have to endure such treacherous weather conditions. That's why, and I hate to say it, but March in Cuse,

It's over.

It is time for this relationship to end. Unfortunately, we, as a Syracuse student body have moved on. I'm sorry. It isn't us, it's you.

We deserve to be with a month that treats us better, a month that allows for fun spring clothes and light jackets, for Birkenstocks and sunglasses. We want frisbee on the quad and Block Party and Mayfest. We want to tailgate on front porches and frat houses throwing their darties. We want the end of the semester vibes and to have the weather put us in a good mood, and that just wasn't something you were contributing to our relationship. April, on the other hand, has been all of this and more. Waking up to April's 60 and 70-degree weather is just more pleasant than your 30s and 40s. We as a campus, need to look out for our happiness and health.

I'm sorry, but this is how it has to be.

Goodbye March! Thanks for doing us all dirty.

-The Syracuse Student Body

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I Don't Care How Hard Your Major Is, There Is No Excuse Not To Have A Job While In College

If the name on your credit card does not match the name on your birth certificate, then you really need to re-evaluate your priorities.

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We seem to live in a generation where everyone wants to go to college.

It is nice to see that people want to invest in their education, but at what expense? It's easy to commit to a school, and it is even easier to get yourself and your parents into thousands of dollars of debt because you're "living your best life."

To me, it's pathetic if you're over the age of eighteen and you don't have some sort of income or responsibilities outside of homework and attendance. The old excuse, "I want to focus on school," is no longer valid. You can get all A's while having a job, and that has nothing to do with intelligence, but rather your will to succeed. "I don't have time for a job/internship," translates to, "I'm really lazy,".

You don't need to overextend yourself and work forty hours a week, but you should at least work summers or weekends. Any job is a good job. Whether you babysit, walk dogs, work retail, serve tables or have an internship. You need to do something.

"My major is too hard," is not an excuse either. If you can go out on the weekends, you can work.

The rigor of your major should not determine whether or not you decide to contribute to your education. If the name on your credit card does not match the name on your birth certificate, then you really need to re-evaluate your priorities.

Working hard in school does not compensate for having any sense of responsibility.

I understand that not everyone has the same level of time management skills, but if you truly can't work during the school year, you need to be working over the summer and during your breaks. The money you make should not exclusively be for spending; you should be putting it towards books, loans, or housing.

Internships are important too, paid or not.

In my opinion, if you chose not to work for income, you should be working for experience. Your resume includes your degree, but your degree does not include your resume. Experience is important, and internships provide experience. A person working an unpaid internship deserves the same credit as a student working full/part-time.

Though they are not bringing in income for their education, they are gaining experience, and opening up potential opportunities for themselves.

If you go to college just to go to class and do nothing else, then you don't deserve to be there. College is so much more than just turning in assignments, it is a place for mental and academic growth. You need to contribute to your education, whether it is through working for income or working for knowledge or experience.

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Dear High School, From An Alumna Who Just Finished Freshman Year Of College

I may not have known it at the time, but you prepared me for the ride of my life.

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It was about this time last year that I was practically pulling my hair out because I was so close to the end of high school. Graduation was so close I could taste it. The air was warm, classes were dwindling down, and the classrooms I knew so well were cluttered with final papers waiting to be graded. Those four years went by so quickly, but at the same time, it felt like they dragged on forever.

I don't even know how I would describe high school. For me, it wasn't terrible, but by senior year, I could tell it was time for a change and I was itching to get out. In retrospect, I wish I would have held on to those final moments of high school. I wish I would have told my teachers how much I truly appreciated them. I wish I spent more time with my friends before I had to leave them for my next adventure. I wish I didn't take the warmth of familiar faces for granted.

I really thought that I knew everything back then. I thought that since I was amongst the older students at that school, there was nothing else that my high school could offer me. I had seen it all, learned all the tricks. I left high school knowing exactly what I wanted.

But here's the thing:

The way I see it now is that high school is not about figuring everything out. To me, high school is about preparing yourself to explore different opportunities and to give every one of those opportunities a fair chance. To me, high school is about acquiring skills that are necessary for any line of work so that you can enter college, or whatever that next step might be, fully equipped with the best of yourself.

Some people have their whole life planned out at an early age and they stick with that plan through and through. I applaud those people for finding something they love so much and committing to it wholeheartedly, but for a lot of us, the truth of the matter is that there is so much about the world and about ourselves that we do not know.

We owe it to ourselves to explore the unknown. Because what I have learned this past year is that one discovery leads to another and you never know what you might find along the way.

What I thought I wanted a year ago is vastly different than what I want now. And it's all because high school taught me to have an open mind about everything I do. High school taught me to put my best foot forward every step of the way. It taught me to stay humble and understand that there is something that I can learn from every person I meet. It taught me the value of exploration.

So, although I don't remember every math formula that I learned in those four years, the things that I do remember turned out to be much more valuable to me even if I didn't realize it at the time.

My advice to high school seniors as they count down the days until graduation: hold on to these moments, work hard until the end, stay humble, and always keep an open mind.

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