5 Awesome Tweets For The City Of Champions

5 Awesome Tweets For The City Of Champions

Boston has done it again this week with yet another Championship Title

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I have grown up in Boston during a time where all of their sports teams have thrived. Since 2002, one of our major sports team has won a championship title every year. This past week the Boston Red Sox won the World Series, and Boston fans are yet again going crazy over their city of championships. Here are some awesome tweets that have been released about the city's amazing streak.

1.@PatriotsSBLII

"The Red Sox ended a 630-day championship drought for the only city that measures its championship drought in days."

2. @sargvn

"How lucky are we to live in New England where we piss excellence."

3. @stoolpresidente

"My favorite part of being from Boston is being better than everybody else."

4. @Ian_OConnor

"On 10/17/04, the Red Sox entered 9th inn of ALCS Game 4 down 0-3 & 1 run to greatest closer ever, about to go 86 years w/o a title. They've won 4 World Series w/3 managers since that night. The haunted franchise now haunts everyone else."


@AdamMKaufman "The #Patriots won last night. The #Celtics and #Bruins won tonight.
The #RedSox #WorldSeries parade is tomorrow. Boston fans are dressing as winners for Halloween."

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The 19th Amendment Did Not Affect All Women

The fight for Voting Rights across the country is still a struggle.
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It’s a fact we’ve learned to regurgitate; in the year 1920, the 19th Amendment was ratified. It prohibited any United States citizen from being denied the right to vote on account of their gender. It's been hailed as the one of the greatest, if the not the greatest achievement for our country's women's rights movement.

What we don’t hear, is that two years after this amendment was passed, the Supreme Court ruled people of Japanese heritage were ineligible to become naturalized citizens -- a court found the same with Asian Indians in the following year. Not being able to become naturalized citizens, of course, affected what demographic of women could actually vote. In 1924, Native Americans were granted citizenship through the Indian Citizenship Act, but many states still passed laws preventing Native Americans from voting, for as late as the year 1957.

It wasn’t until 1943 that Chinese Americans were first permitted to become citizens, after the Chinese Exclusion Act was repealed. For Filipinos, it wasn’t until 1946; for Japanese Americans and other Asian Americans, this did not come until 1952. In 1964, women of lower socio-economic status were faced with one less barrier to voting; there was now no tax to pay anywhere in the country in order to vote.

In 1965, the Voting Rights Act was passed abolishing legal barriers that prevented black Americans from voting. In 1990, polling centers were required to have accommodations for Americans with disabilities with the Americans with Disabilities Act. In the year 2000, a federal court decided US Territories could not vote in presidential elections. The fight for Voting Rights across the country is still a struggle; in this month, alone, a federal appeals court struck down a voter ID law in North Carolina that was described as targeting African American voters "with almost surgical precision."

Why is it, then, that we accept the 19th Amendment as being the point when women were allowed the right to vote? It's presented in our history classes, our media, etc., as if the struggle to get women to vote ended with the passing of this amendment to the Constitution, which is simply not true. To state so would be to exclude essentially all women of color, among white women who couldn't afford to pay a poll tax.

Some could argue there’s exceptions to every fact and law in our history, but it’s not as if one specific group of women were an exception to this. Asian women, Native American women, black women, poor women and more were unable to exercise their right to vote, and their struggles have been arguably erased in the acceptation of the 19th Amendment being the point in which all women could vote.

When we use the word women, we assume it applies to women of every race and ethnicity; instead, it’s been reduced to mean only white women. When we say women earned the right to vote in 1920, we're whitewashing history. To be fair, we have no reason to not pause and think if this is a whitewashing of history, because of the pure lack of information on voting rights of marginalized and minority groups in our country.

Often, high school American history classes have been dubbed as being a history of "great white men." It's not hard to picture the only real segment of women's history taught in most history classes really only applies to that of "great white women." It shouldn’t be surprising that we’ve been conditioned to accept the notion that saying women got the right to vote in 1920 as appropriate, because of how our history is often taught to us.

Recently, with the recognition of white feminism becoming slowly more prevalent in our country's society, it’s important for us as a people to not portray women’s struggles as merely white women’s struggles. It's more than frustrating to see our politicians, socially-conscious celebrities, and other prominent figures speak as if the 19th Amendment was the end of women's struggle for voting rights. It's easy to accept the erasing of the history. After all, most people were taught a history that erased struggles of marginalized groups. It’s harder to try to write history back into a place it deserves to be. Women worked hard for the 19th Amendment to be ratified. It's time to recognize women that also worked hard for their own voting struggles, long after the 19th Amendment was ratified.

Cover Image Credit: Bio.

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Listen Up Sports Fans, It's Time To Give The Mets The Attention They Rightfully Deserve

The New York Mets struggled mightily last season, and with new front office management, here's how the Mets are shaping up for next season.

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The New York Mets were at the bottom of the pack in the MLB last season. They look like they are starting to shake things up a lot, but we won't know if that helps until the season starts. Here's how things are shaping up to look.

1. The Mets hired a new General Manager who is very active

The New York Mets recently hired a new General Manager, Brodie Van Wagenen. After his hire, many Mets fan were skeptical of him since he was an agent who represented MLB players and had no general management experience. However, right off the bat (pun intended), Van Wagenen is shaking up the Mets roster with an early offseason trade, and likely several more to come.

2. But hopefully not too active

There is a perfect balance to a general manager's activity level. Too few trades and signings mean the team is likely to do just as poorly as last season, and the fans won't be too happy about that, especially because the fans are from New York. Yikes. On the other hand, too many trades mean that you're inevitably going to trade away a player that you shouldn't have and you'll get next to nothing in return, again leaving New York sports fans angered, and that's something you just never want to do. As per trade rumors regarding the New York Mets, it seems as if the new GM is coming close to pulling off a bad trade surrounding Brandon Nimmo, Michael Conforto, or Amed Rosario.

3. Robinson Cano is a crucial piece to the puzzle for the Mets

The Mets recently acquired all-star second baseman Robinson Cano and arguably the best closing pitcher in baseball last season, Edwin Diaz. While Diaz is a key addition to the roster, Robinson Cano is really the centerpiece. Cano spent many seasons playing for the New York Yankees, so he has experience playing in New York — good experience, too. He was an all-star four out of his eight seasons with the New York Yankees, so he definitely has shown his skill set off in New York.

4. But things could turn sour with Robinson Cano

Last season, Robinson Cano was suspended for 80 games for using performance-enhancing drugs. If he did that while playing in Seattle, it would be easy to imagine how quickly things could take a turn for the worse if he is playing in New York.

5. There are still many good free agents to sign

While some free agents like Patrick Corbin have recently been taken off the market, there still remains a large number of quality players who have yet to sign with a team. Perhaps the biggest free agent name in any sport is Bryce Harper. The Mets should make a serious push to sign Bryce Harper which would definitely smooth things over with New York fans if the new GM decides to follow through with that aforementioned bad trade.

6. But time and money are running out

The Mets have little time left to meet with these big free agents since many other teams have already had meetings with Harper and other players like Manny Machado. Additionally, it doesn't help that the Mets only have limited money left to sign players when they still need to focus on resigning some of their own.

The New York Mets have made some very positive changes this offseason, but there are plenty of opportunities for negative changes, too. We'll just have to wait and see how the rest of the offseason goes and pray for a good 2019 season for the New York Mets.

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