American Media, Your Next Goal Is To Represent East Asian Women Of ALL Sizes

American Media, Your Next Goal Is To Represent East Asian Women Of ALL Sizes

East Asian women should be encouraged to embrace their bodies too, especially for those who don't exactly fit into what many see as the standard for Asian beauty.

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When it comes to East Asian women, there is a very specific view of what they should look like. People often expect them to be small and thin, with sleek, straight black hair. This is not what all East Asian women look like, but it is certainly what most of the East Asian women succeeding in American media look like.

Popular Asian-American actresses like Constance Wu, Lana Condor, and Kelly Marie Tran, all seem to fit this description. And it isn't their fault. I'm happy to see their success since Asian-Americans are so underrepresented. The issue is not that these women are succeeding, it's the perception of what Asian beauty should be. There is enough pressure to fit a certain body type in many Asian-American households, with these same beauty standards being widespread in East Asian countries.

In the United States, women are beginning to promote body positivity, with many of them being more open about their bodies on social media, and a number of plus-size models, such as Ashley Graham, speaking out about issues of inclusion in the modeling industry. What's missing from these movements is Asian women. Yes, of course, there are some, but Asian-American women seem to be rarely represented in these discussions of body positivity. East Asian women should be encouraged to embrace their bodies too, especially for those who don't exactly fit into what many see as the standard for Asian beauty.

Everyone deserves to see themselves being represented and to see that they can succeed no matter what they look like. Going forward, I hope to see more Asian plus-size models being celebrated. There are already some steps being taken in South Korea, with models like Taylor Tak promoting size inclusivity in the modeling industry. Hopefully, this extends to Asian women in the United States as well. It's been a great year for Asian-American representation, and I'd love to see this continue with Asian women of all sizes.

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If You Own 6 Of These 10 Brands, You Are 100 Percent Basic

How basic are you?

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akumari
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For every brand you own, give yourself a point.

5. The North Face Bookbag

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6. Patagonia

Patagaonia Jacket

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7. Hunter Rainboots

Hunter Rainboots

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9. Nike Shorts (NORTS)

What was your score? Are you truly basic or not? If you are BASIC embrace that, who cares what anyone thinks! If you aren't basic, well then you are clearly embracing your style and thriving! Meanwhile, the rest of us are BASIC as can be and we love it!

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akumari

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Believe It Or Not, Being The 'Model Minority' Is Not A Privilege

Asian-American history is not something that is widely known or talked about, and for that, Asian-Americans are perceived as more privileged than other minorities.

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The topic of racism is one that is very much prevalent in the United States. However, in conversations about racism and marginalized groups, it seems that Asian-Americans are often excluded. The Asian-American experience is different from that of other minorities, with the model minority myth being a major contributing factor. While being viewed as a "model minority" may not seem like such a bad thing for Asians upon first glance, being a model minority does not equate to privilege.

There is a notion that Asian-Americans have suffered less from racism, and that they are privileged compared to other minorities. From elementary school, American students learn about Native American genocide and the history of racism against African Americans, but Asian-Americans rarely appear in any US history courses. They are not shown to have suffered a long history of systematic racism in the United States as other minorities have. Asian-American history is not something that is widely known or talked about, and for that, Asian-Americans are perceived as more privileged than other minorities.

Here's the issue: just because it isn't talked about, just because it isn't taught in school, doesn't mean it doesn't exist. Discrimination against Asian-Americans is a part of American history, from the Chinese Exclusion Act, which was the first immigration law to target a specific ethnic group, in 1882, to the Japanese internment camps in the 1940s, to the murder of Vincent Chin in 1982, in which the murderers served no jail time, to the issues of media representation that still exist now. This is a history that has seemingly been erased and brushed to the side so that Asians can be used as the model minority.

I'm not asking that everyone become an expert on Asian-American history. It's enough to know that it exists, and that Asian-Americans are still a racial minority in the United States and still suffer from racism. Instead of dismissing them as privileged, acknowledge that Asian-Americans have faced discrimination and include them in conversations about racism.

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