American Antisemitism Has Many Forms, All Must Be Confronted

American Antisemitism Has Many Forms, All Must Be Confronted

A brief look into American antisemitism, an abhorrent creation.
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In America, there is oftentimes this prevailing belief among its citizens that we have advanced beyond discrimination in most forms. Even isolated incidents are disregarded as simply that; an isolated incident. However, it still exists, and one kind that is seldom discussed in America is antisemitism, which America has a long, embarrassing history of. Considering the recent rise in hate crimes across America, especially against Jews, this is something that should be discussed in the public sphere.

First, these beliefs and actions are still somewhat prevalent. Many people believe in the fairly antisemitic theory that the Rothschild family controls everything. There was an uptick in people who believed in the idea that Jews "controlled Wall Street" and that they infiltrated the government following the Great Recession. Going further back, you have individuals such as Henry Ford, who helped the infamous "Protocols of the Elders of Zion" be proliferated throughout America. Hell, stereotypes involving the infamous hooked noses, yarmulkes, and money are still seen in comedy and other means of entertainment. Disgusting.

Second, these beliefs are especially rampant in our universities. Though anecdotal, there are many stories of having swastikas carved into property, having fliers distributed alleging Jewish involvement in 9/11, members of various far-right/far-left groups stating that "Hitler did not finish the job." Hell, even "Heil Hitler" has been found quite a few times over the past year, according to the ADL. Various horrifying incidents perpetrated by individuals of various political ideologies. What's worse is that the number of incidents, according to the ADL, went up 96%. Ninety-six percent. That IS "deplorable."

This sentiment is also found in American politics. Some modern-day characters, including Holocaust denier Art Jones, have been repudiated across the board. Others, however, such as Paul Nehlen, candidate for Paul Ryan's seat, have been semi-elevated. People like Nehlen, who tweet out (((echo))) to denote Jews, or refer to people as having "Zionist masters," have gained considerable clout via Twitter and other social media platforms. Going further back, you have president Nixon, who complained about "all the Jews in the government." The red scares of the 20th century associating Jews with Communism, therefore making many enemies of the state in the eyes of the populace. All awful.

This may seem a bit disjointed, but this is a subject that is important to me. Discrimination of any form should be intolerable, but oftentimes it seems as if antisemitism is under-reported (potentially due to the fact that there are relatively fewer Jews in America). Whether it be Louis Farrakhan saying Jews engineered the slave trade, or Paul Nehlen/Art Jones/Richard Spencer saying American Jews essentially weren't for America, antisemitism is an evil which should be confronted, especially with the documented rise in hate crimes against Jews in the past year.

Discrimination is a plague of society, and it needs to be eliminated, somehow, some way.

Cover Image Credit: Chicago Sun Times

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12 Things Only Low-Maintenance Girls Understand

I promise we aren’t lazy, just easy going.
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Sometimes low-maintenance girls are looked at as lazy or sloppy. But in reality, I think low-maintenance girls are just so confident in who they are that putting in that extra effort isn't important to them.

Here are 12 things that only low-maintenance girls understand:

1. Leggings or sweat pants and a T-shirt is your normal everyday outfit

Why spend the day uncomfortable in some tight jeans or mini skirt when you can lounge around in some comfy clothes? We aren't here to impress anyone, we are just trying to sit back and chill.

2. Makeup is a special occasion

If you catch a low-maintenance girl with makeup on, take it as a compliment. We are trying to touch our face and rub our eyes as much as we'd like without makeup getting in the way. Not to mention, we wouldn't dare spend over $15 on some foundation.

3. We would rather stay in with a movie then go out for the evening

Something low-key and low stress always sounds better than spending the time, and the money, for a night out. I am perfectly content with taking advantage of my $7.99 monthly payment for Netflix.

4. You're always the first one ready

While your friends spend hours doing their hair, makeup and then finding the perfect outfit, you sit around and wait. Your 10 minutes thrown-together-look gives you time to nap while everyone else takes their sweet time.

5. When you say you "don't care what we do," you really don't care

Seriously, a date night off the McDonald's dollar menu is fine by me. I am not expecting you to wine and dine me on a big extravagant evening, I'm just trying to get a Big Mac in my mouth.

6. Your messy bun isn't a fashion statement, it's actually just your hairstyle

We aren't about to spend time curling or straightening our hair everyday. Every day is a good day to throw your hair up into a ponytail or bun.

7. The extent of your jewelry collection is one pair of earrings and maybe a necklace

Who needs more than one pair of earrings? Diamond studs match everything… right?

8. And your shoe collection is even smaller

Should I wear flip-flops or Converse?

9. Shopping isn't exactly your favorite thing to do

Who has patience for finding the perfect designer brands or finding the best fit? I am perfectly content with my T-shirts and leggings. One size fits all.

10. Your favorite gifts are the sentimental ones, not the expensive ones

A homemade card or a small gift that makes someone think of you is forever better and more meaningful than an expensive present. I don't want your money, I just want to know you thought of me.

11. You don't put in the effort to chase after a guy

I'm awesome and I know it. If a guy is worth it enough to be in my life, he can come after me. I am not down for any games or players. Just someone who embraces my low-maintenance qualities.

12. You are always the first person to help someone out

Giving your friends a ride or lending them two dollars isn't a huge deal. Just helping someone out gives you peace of mind. Everyone should have time to help a homie out.

Cover Image Credit: http://www.cosboots.com/sale/christmas/christmas.html

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I Asked A Group Of College Students If Ariana Grande's Fake Tan Is Problematic, Here's The Consensus

"It's just a tan. Who doesn't want to be tan?"

Ellie
Ellie
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For the last few weeks, every time I have gone on my phone, I keep seeing articles in my recommended about how Ariana Grande's fake tan has gone too far and considered blackface and how she also appropriates Hispanic/Latino culture. Although it kept popping up on my phone, I haven't heard anyone talk about it so I questioned how many people actually thought this. I looked up a picture of her and I was surprised to see that she was just as dark or possibly even darker than Nicki Minaj, so I thought, okay, maybe some people really do think this.

I created a poll and sent it to all my friends and club group chats asking for people's opinions. I asked three questions. Do you think Ariana Grande's fake tan should be considered blackface? Do you think she appropriates black culture in any way? Do you think she appropriates Hispanic/Latino culture in any way? The yes or no questions were mandatory on the form but an explanation was optional.

These were the results along with some reasoning:

Do you think Ariana Grande's fake tan should be considered blackface?

82.4% of respondents said no, it is not blackface, and 17.6% said it is.

The only explanation for yes was "She is several shades darker."

Some of the explanations for no included:

"It's a spray tan. Everyone gets them. And as a black person, I don't find it offensive."

"She isn't changing her skin tone to suppress a minority, she is doing it because being tan is more on trend. She isn't doing it with the intent of hurting anyone."

"Her tan is not an attempt to seem black or to mock black people."

"It's just a tan. Who doesn't want to be tan?!"

"Some people just use too much tan. Example: Donald Trump. His fake tan is most likely not blackface."

"A good tan helps with confidence! I know that when I'm tan, I feel 100x prettier. I'm not a fan of Grande, but she got a tan! I don't think it's anything more."

"If someone is uncomfortable in their pale skin, they have every right to tan. She is not claiming to be anything other than white, she is just changing something about herself that made her insecure. Pale skin is often seen as unattractive, so this is perfectly normal for her to want to alter it."

"Everyone does fake tans. She just wants to show her real Italian color."

"We live in a time where getting a cheap tan equals wanting to be a certain race. These types of people are looking for something to be offended by at this point even if it's a non-issue."

The next question: Do you think she appropriates black culture in other ways? (language, appearance, etc.)

88.2% of respondents said she is not and 11.8% said that she is.

There were no explanations for yes here, but here are some of the ones to no.

"She acts too white."

"She's not desperate like the Kardashians, so there you go."

"I don't think she is doing anything to appropriate black culture, I think she is just trying to make money"

"I don't believe she is appropriating black culture simply by being who she is. If she was exploiting black culture like 'acting black' in a music video, that would be a much different case."

"I don't think her appearance does, but not sure about other characteristics"

"She is not claiming to be black or anything else. Many people have fake tans, it is normal in our society."

"She's expressing her interests."

I think it's interesting that the percentage went down.

The final Question: Do you think she appropriates Hispanic/Latino culture in any way? (language, appearance, etc.)

Again, 88.2% of respondents said she is not and 11.8% said she is.

There were again no explanations for yes. This time most of the answers for no were "Same as previous answers" as well as these:

"She doesn't act or take on any traits of people from these cultures."

"No. She's just expressing her interests."

"I've never seen her appropriate their culture."

Before I concluded these findings I looked to see if there were any other reasons people would find it problematic. The main thing I found was that she takes off her fake tan to be on magazine covers such as Vogue. This, in some people's minds, means she is using the dark skin to gain a following and gain a wider audience yet took it off to play to racist mainstream beauty standards.

I was hoping looking into all this would help me form a more solid opinion on the situation. As of now, I don't think it was done in a harmful sense, so it is probably okay. I hate when unnecessary problems are made. Yet, I can see why some people find her fake dark skin to be a problem. Similar to the Instagram influencers who were pretending to be black. I would love to hear more opinions on the matter and get more viewpoints.

Ellie
Ellie

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