Analysis : Lawyers and Law Graduates In The United States. The Misconceptions People Have.

Analysis : Lawyers and Law Graduates In The United States. The Misconceptions People Have.

Lots of People Spread Misleading Information, Never trust Rumors.
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College not only provides us with a community that strives for prosperity, it will give us a key to new flourishing possibilities, and one of that is law school. Graduating high school, I had a fantasy that this journey will be simplistic, obstruction free and with extraordinary compensation in the end. However, that isn't the situation at all, in fact, they are more obstacles and facts that people need to know about the law field before dedicating to this route.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in the time span of 10 years 2014-2024, there will be an estimated 157,00 total job openings for lawyers. This sounds great alone, it becomes troubling to discover that in 2016, there was a total of 37,124 law graduates. If this trend maintains, there would be approximately 350,000 law graduates in 10 years, but according to BLS, only 157,000 jobs for lawyer positions will be available. This means that there is a good percentage of law graduates that don't become lawyers. The American Bar Association has data for 2016 law graduates and the numbers don't lie.

Around 35 percent of law graduates don't become lawyers and the tuition keeps increasing. 85 law schools in the United States have an 80 percent or lower bar exam passing rate. Pace University with 70% bar passing rate charges $47,210 tuition and Thomas Jefferson School of Law with a 45% bar passing rate charges $49,500 tuition. Additionally, with the case there aren't enough lawyer openings for the graduates, this doesn't seem prosperous some might imagine law school to be.

Speaking of Thomas Jefferson School of Law, if you are nevertheless planning to go to law school, use the employment summaries from the American Bar Association to search up a law school before applying. 64 out of 210 graduates from Thomas Jefferson School of Law are unemployed, that is 30% who have no job, and not even a teacher.


Some graduating from a school like that has to deal with an average of $120,000 in debt. Private law schools charge ridiculous rates without a promise of a job. There are even misleading debt averages reported from colleges on famous websites like U.S. news. For Law Schools to attract more students, they try their best to lower there reported debt averages to gain more collected tuition money, those averages aren't accurate.

"Law School Transparency reports that a Harvard Law grad with no scholarships will have a student loan bill between $297,548 and $322,348, with a total repayment of between $400,000 on a 10-year plan and $550,000 on a 20-year plan" and "In other words, over 50% of HLS students are paying full price to attend"

"In other words, over 50% of HLS students are paying full price to attend."

"So this means that the average debt of $149,754 reported by HLS and US News may be misleading. I suspect that most of their graduates have much higher loan balances."

This is just one case, plenty of law schools can be around this scale, maybe a little less. At least Harvard gets you a job, unlike Thomas Jefferson. This for-profit law school disproves the myth that the more expensive a college, the better it is for to find a job. A lawyer graduating from Cornell Law School might be making $150,000 a year (probably less), compared to a lawyer graduating CUNY Law making $90,000, can you guess who got more than $200,000 debt to pay up. No shame to Cornell. The journey is troublesome and can be a dangerous investment if you're not careful. Lawyers have a 15% unemployment rate. With what we discussed, it's not a good mix with the outrageous debt and the 65% bar passing rate.

When you hear the rumors that there is high demand for lawyers, they probably mean not the state you live in, but in the entire country. To further illustrate, According to NYTimes Theresa Amato, a lawyer and public advocate at Washington DC, "In Nebraska, 20 out of 93 counties have fewer than four lawyers. Eleven counties have no lawyers at all. The Montana Legal Services Association, a nonprofit group that is partly federally funded, reports having only 13 case-handling lawyers for the entire state". There is unbalance of lawyers for different states, so while there is notably few demand for new lawyers in New York, states like Nebraska and Montana have a scarcity of lawyers. Some states have enough lawyers while others are looking. The author further explains that law school debt makes graduates unwilling to take lower paying legal jobs, they weren't fantasizing that while in school.

You may be willing to go through this because you have a passion to protect, serve the people and bring justice. Families are hurt, political tensions are rising, deportation, and everyone deserves the right to a lawyer. Ask yourself this first.

Am I helping people when in the end, the person I'm helping is paying unaffordable legal fees, just so I can make a great living?

That's for another time to debate.

Cover Image Credit: google

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3 Awkward Personnel Situations Every Business Might Face This Year

Personnel problems are some of the trickiest to deal with in the business world so be sure to plan ahead.
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Personnel problems are some of the trickiest to deal with in the business world. You’re not just dealing with numbers—you’re dealing with people and all the attendant emotions they bring with them. As your business year continues, you are likely to run into a few awkward personnel situations. Below are three that tend to impact businesses across the world.

Inter-Office Relationships

While television and movies make inter-office relationships look fantastic, they’re actually a headache for anyone who runs a business. If you’re lucky, the people involved will keep everything very low-key and you’ll never be any the wiser. If you’re not, you can expect some real personnel issues to crop up. The best way to deal with these problems is to be equitable and to follow any protocols you have in place to the letter. Don’t become involved with these relationships on a personal level and make sure to keep a level head when dealing with any of the resulting problems.

Bringing in a New Generation

There’s a good chance that you’ll be bringing in a new generation of workers this year, and that’s going to mean changing the way you do things. Despite the doom and gloom forecast by most of the media when it comes to dealing with millennials, you won’t have to completely upend your business in order to cater to these new hires. You will, however, have to adapt to workers just as they adapt to you.

Many millennials pursue postgraduate education if they can manage it while working at the same time. For example, a hospital may hire a young nurse with an associate’s degree in nursing who wants to pursue further education. That employee can take an ADN to MSN program at the same time as working. The availability of online education makes hiring millennials a possible investment for greater future returns.

Dealing with Major Shifts

One way or another, your personnel needs are likely to change this year. You might have to deal with the pain of letting some of your best employees go, watch as one of your managers moves on to greener pastures, or have to hire a number of new workers quickly in order to fill vacancies. You can’t expect this year to be the same as last year, so don’t rest comfortably just because things are going well now. Start looking at your staffing needs early so you can put contingency plans in place.

You might also have to make major changes in your operations based on your employee demographics. It’s obvious that each generation or background your employees come from can change the way you have to run things. It can be tempting to attempt a one-size-fits-all approach, but research on leadership through multigenerational differences suggests that you may be better off playing to the strengths of each demographic individually. If you can draw out the best of your employees with a unique, and even personal, approach, your business will inevitably thrive.

The next year might bring some real changes to your workforce. Be prepared to deal with relationships, new hires, and wildly changing circumstances as the year goes by. The more you prepare, the better you will be able to weather the storms that are likely to come your way.

Cover Image Credit: Pixabay

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People Who Don't Work Reflect Their Whole Generation In A Bad Light

When did work ethics equal a whole age group?
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I'm sure everyone has seen that meme where the message has a guy saying, "You ever looked at a coworker and think 'How the hell are you still working here?'"

Well, I have a coworker like that. This person will come up with any way to not work. Which I continuously find hilarious since they begged my boss for the job because they just up and quit their previous job without a backup plan.

They'll come in, work for a little while, then find excuses to leave the floor. They need water. They need to use the bathroom. They need to call a few people. They need to send a text. They want to talk about a new diet they're trying. Then they want to fix themselves dinner. They get upset when they're told to do the work they're supposed to do. They rely on shortcuts and hacks to get out of doing it. Then they take 30 minutes to get ready to leave every evening. Mind you, they're only scheduled to work four and a half hours a day, second shift.

Recently, laziness on the job is blamed on Millennials. Yet, a few years ago, it was said that Millenials are more productive and economically innovative. Laziness at work or the inability to get a job was a prominent trait of Generation X.

Everyone in my personal circle is a Millennial with excellent work ethics. They all are in careers. Everyone I know that is from Generation X either bounce from job to job, work under-the-table jobs, or don't work at all.

My lazy coworker belongs to Generation X. I don't think that's a coincidence.

I'm not saying all Gen Xers are lazy and all Millennials are successful. However, I, and many others in my circle, have personally witnessed these things. Despite all the variables that could present a miscalculation in data, Generation X and Millennials tend to act similarly.

My personal work ethic came about because I wanted to escape my home life. I held down part-time jobs and high school to avoid being at home. Once I left home and went to college, I worked a lot to prove that I could support myself and not have to go back home.

I don't know why people don't want to work. Working provides people with the income to get whatever they need and want. Working not only gives one something to do but also provides a purpose in life other than just existing. Working is one of the foundations of living in America. So again, with all the benefits to working, I don't understand why there are people who don't want to work.

I could talk to this coworker about the benefits of working. I could get to the bottom of why they're so against doing the job they begged for. But some things people should just...do. One should want to dispel the nonworking stereotypes that society puts on Generation X and Millennials. Perhaps that's too much to ask for.

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

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