I Owe Tomi Lahren An Apology

I Owe Tomi Lahren An Apology

From a liberal, and yes, this apology is serious.
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Tomi, your “Final Thoughts” have infuriated me on more than one occasion. Your controversial political comments have received you plenty of praise and criticism, but you already know that. People love you or they hate you, but they’re talking about you and you get conversations started about important topics/issues. I cannot say I’ve ever agreed with you though. As a poor reflection on me, in addition to my disagreement with you, I never liked you or even respected you.

Until this past week. You appeared on “The View” to join the panel of women to discuss politics. I was annoyed with your defense of Trump’s Muslim ban and when you said Trump was in no way “anti-woman” I found myself rolling my eyes. But then, you were asked about your pro-choice beliefs and my jaw dropped. I’ve held so many opinions about you based on your standpoint on other political issues that I never even thought to consider your stance on the abortion issue. You do not claim to be a feminist, and actually dispute feminists’ arguments, so I just assumed you were pro-life, as many others, I assume, did too. That was wrong.

When you said, “so stay out of my guns, and you can stay out of my body as well” I wanted to physically applaud you. Your statement was so strong, confident, and spunky. As a fellow woman, I was so proud of your comment and you unapologetic tone. And then I shamed myself. Your tone of this comment was no different than the way you express your views on other political issues, the only difference being this time I agreed with you. You are honest, raw, strong, confident, and overwhelmingly unapologetic in your “Final Thoughts” on TheBlaze, something I would praise if the show were hosted by a liberal woman. I would watch that segment every week excitedly. I realized how hypocritical I was.

I am liberal, feminist woman. I pride myself on supporting other women, encouraging each other to be ambitious, strong, and to never refrain from expressing our opinions/values, and to feel empowered. Yet, here I have been tearing a strong, confident woman who holds her values close to her heart down simply because we have differing opinions. Tomi, I am sorry for that. I have realized that I should have immense respect for you, despite our differing opinions. Women need to stick together, especially in politics and other male-dominated situations.

I am also sorry that your pro-choice comments got your “Final Thoughts” suspended. Nobody should be punished for speaking their minds and owning their opinions. I understand TheBlaze is a conservative network and that they have a right to air commentators who reflect their views, but that does not make suspending you morally right. In many aspects, you are a conservative and being pro-choice does not diminish identifying yourself as such. Almost nobody is 100 percent one party. That is just not logical.

TheBlaze is limiting themselves by not expressing many aspects, opinions, and individuals of the conservative party because they disliked one of your comments. Glenn Beck, the founder of TheBlaze's tweets about your comments have been petty, and yours have been strong and demonstrating that you will continue to be strong and honest. I am proud of you for not apologizing for your viewpoints.



You have resonated with so many people and you have been a voice for many young conservative women. So, I hope they do lift your suspension. But, if they don’t, I know this will not be the last we heard from you. I look forward to hearing your thoughts on politics and current events while I embrace my newfound, and long overdue, respect for you. I may not agree with you, but I respect what you’re doing.

See Also: An Apology To Tomi Lahren From A Republican

Cover Image Credit: theblaze.com

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An Open Letter To Democrats From A Millennial Republican

Why being a Republican doesn't mean I'm inhuman.
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Dear Democrats,

I have a few things to say to you — all of you.

You probably don't know me. But you think you do. Because I am a Republican.

Gasp. Shock. Horror. The usual. I know it all. I hear it every time I come out of the conservative closet here at my liberal arts university.

SEE ALSO: What I Mean When I Say I'm A Young Republican

“You're a Republican?" people ask, saying the word in the same tone that Draco Malfoy says “Mudblood."

I know that not all Democrats feel about Republicans this way. Honestly, I can't even say for certain that most of them do. But in my experience, saying you're a Republican on a liberal college campus has the same effect as telling someone you're a child molester.

You see, in this day and age, with leaders of the Republican Party standing up and spouting unfortunately ridiculous phrases like “build a wall," and standing next to Kim Davis in Kentucky after her release, we Republicans are given an extreme stereotype. If you're a Republican, you're a bigot. You don't believe in marriage equality. You don't believe in racial equality. You don't believe in a woman's right to choose. You're extremely religious and want to impose it on everyone else.

Unfortunately, stereotypes are rooted in truth. There are some people out there who really do think these things and feel this way. And it makes me mad. The far right is so far right that they make the rest of us look bad. They make sure we aren't heard. Plenty of us are fed up with their theatrics and extremism.

For those of us brave enough to wear the title “Republican" in this day and age, as millennials, it's different. Many of us don't agree with these brash ideas. I'd even go as far as to say that most of us don't feel this way.

For me personally, being a Republican doesn't even mean that I automatically vote red.

When people ask me to describe my political views, I usually put it pretty simply. “Conservative, but with liberal social views."

“Oh," they say, “so you're a libertarian."

“Sure," I say. But that's the thing. I'm not really a libertarian.

Here's what I believe:

I believe in marriage equality. I believe in feminism. I believe in racial equality. I don't want to defund Planned Parenthood. I believe in birth control. I believe in a woman's right to choose. I believe in welfare. I believe more funds should be allocated to the public school system.

Then what's the problem? Obviously, I'm a Democrat then, right?

Wrong. Because I have other beliefs too.

Yes, I believe in the right to choose — but I'd always hope that unless a pregnancy would result in the bodily harm of the woman, that she would choose life. I believe in welfare, but I also believe that our current system is broken — there are people who don't need it receiving it, and others who need it that cannot access it.

I believe in capitalism. I believe in the right to keep and bear arms, because I believe we have a people crisis on our hands, not a gun crisis. Contrary to popular opinion, I do believe in science. I don't believe in charter schools. I believe in privatizing as many things as possible. I don't believe in Obamacare.

Obviously, there are other topics on the table. But, generally speaking, these are the types of things we millennial Republicans get flack for. And while it is OK to disagree on political beliefs, and even healthy, it is NOT OK to make snap judgments about me as a person. Identifying as a Republican does not mean I am the same as Donald Trump.

Just because I am a Republican, does not mean you know everything about me. That does not give you the right to make assumptions about who I am as a person. It is not OK for you to group me with my stereotype or condemn me for what I feel and believe. And for a party that prides itself on being so open-minded, it shocks me that many of you would be so judgmental.

So I ask you to please, please, please reexamine how you view Republicans. Chances are, you're missing some extremely important details. If you only hang out with people who belong to your own party, chances are you're missing out on great people. Because, despite what everyone believes, we are not our stereotype.

Sincerely,

A millennial Republican

Cover Image Credit: NEWSWORK.ORG

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Why The Idea Of 'No Politics At The Dinner Table' Takes Place And Why We Should Avoid It

When did having a dialogue become so rare?

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Why has the art of civilized debate and conversation become unheard of in daily life? Why is it considered impolite to talk politics with coworkers and friends? Expressing ideas and discussing different opinions should not be looked down upon.

I have a few ideas as to why this is our current societal norm.

1. Politics is personal.

Your politics can reveal a lot about who you are. Expressing these (sometimes controversial) opinions may put you in a vulnerable position. It is possible for people to draw unfair conclusions from one viewpoint you hold. This fosters a fear of judgment when it comes to our political beliefs.

Regardless of where you lie on the spectrum of political belief, there is a world of assumption that goes along with any opinion. People have a growing concern that others won't hear them out based on one belief.

As if a single opinion could tell you all that you should know about someone. Do your political opinions reflect who you are as a person? Does it reflect your hobbies? Your past?

The question becomes "are your politics indicative enough of who you are as a person to warrant a complete judgment?"

Personally, I do not think you would even scratch the surface of who I am just from knowing my political identification.

2. People are impolite.

The politics themselves are not impolite. But many people who wield passionate, political opinion act impolite and rude when it comes to those who disagree.

The avoidance of this topic among friends, family, acquaintances and just in general, is out of a desire to 'keep the peace'. Many people have friends who disagree with them and even family who disagree with them. We justify our silence out of a desire to avoid unpleasant situations.

I will offer this: It might even be better to argue with the ones you love and care about, because they already know who you are aside from your politics, and they love you unconditionally (or at least I would hope).

We should be having these unpleasant conversations. And you know what? They don't even need to be unpleasant! Shouldn't we be capable of debating in a civilized manner? Can't we find common ground?

I attribute the loss of political conversation in daily life to these factors. 'Keeping the peace' isn't an excuse. We should be discussing our opinions constantly and we should be discussing them with those who think differently.

Instead of discouraging political conversation, we should be encouraging kindness and understanding. That's how we will avoid the unpleasantness that these conversations sometimes bring.

By avoiding them altogether, we are doing our youth a disservice because they are not being exposed to government, law, and politics, and they are not learning to deal with people and ideas that they don't agree with.

Next Thanksgiving, talk politics at the table.

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