American Girl Dolls Are Worth The Money

American Girl Dolls Are Worth The Money

Doll: One hundred and fifteen dollars. Outfit: Twenty two dollars. Life Lessons: Priceless
355
views

When I was younger, I had six American Girl dolls. I also had two Bitty Babies, dolls made by the same company. These dolls did not come cheap, but the values I have learned from playing with them are priceless.

Three of the dolls I had — Kirsten, Molly and Samantha — were from the Historical Collection. These were nothing like the Barbies I had inherited from my older cousins; each American Girl came with a story that was all her own.

When I received Molly as a present on my fifth birthday, I soon found out she was much more than a doll; she was an heirloom. She was so cool-looking, with her glasses, braided hair and blue cardigan. There was also a bonus gift with my Molly: a book.

This book, while only a few chapters, was my introduction to World War II. Reading Molly’s book introduced me to Molly McIntire, a nine-year-old girl who comes of age on the American Homefront. Molly’s father was overseas tending to wounded soldiers and her mother worked as a Red Cross volunteer. Molly is a feisty daydreamer who is not a fan of these changes, and it is not until her fourth book that she realizes the War is affecting more people than she thinks.

Then there was Kirsten Larson, a Pioneer girl who my mother won for me at a school fair. Kirsten was dressed very cozily — a red-striped apron over a blue cotton dress. From her book, I learned that Kirsten was an immigrant from Sweden who was currently living with her family in a Little House on the Prairie in the vast Minnesota plains. A tender-hearted girl, Kirsten is not afraid to try new things and loves animals. Kirsten is also quite creative, a trait that comes to her aid when she is in trouble in book five.

My father gave me Samantha Parkington during a trip to New York City. Samantha was quite popular during this time as her books were being adapted into a television movie. Samantha was definitely the most glamorous doll I had gotten thus far: she had brown wavy hair that was topped off with a plaid purple bow and had an elegant dress to match. With her black tights and Mary Janes, I thought Samantha might have been a tad spoiled.

Of course, reading about her proved me wrong. Samantha could have cared less about her appearance, preferring to ride her bicycle or climb a tree instead of having tea or sewing a doily. She also had a big heart — Samantha became friends with a servant girl and gave her a treasured doll when she moved away to the big city. The two were eventually reunited, and Samantha’s uncle decided to adopt Samantha and her friend to create the family Samantha had always wanted. Samantha learned that if you do good things for others, good things will come to you in exchange.

These dolls are now in a Tupperware bin in my attic, waiting for the day when my children are old enough to cherish them. American Girl has been a staple of not just my childhood, but also of my life. They have shaped the way I think of myself and how I treat others; with my dolls, I have discovered how learning about the past can help create our future.

As I enter my junior year of college, I’m over the moon to see the company is alive and well. As the world is constantly evolving, so have the dolls created by the Pleasant Company. Now you can get American Girl dolls with earrings, braces and even glasses. Something truly revolutionary is the bald option, which allows girls to have a doll without hair. Imagine: a girl going through chemotherapy holding a doll that looks just like her.

There are also other improvements being made to the dolls to accommodate their special owners, as shown in the video here:

American Girl dolls are unlike any other toy in the world. There has never been a doll that has the power to encourage a girl that it’s okay to be different, smart and curious.

Cover Image Credit: nationswell.com

Popular Right Now

The End Of The Semester As Told By Todd Chrisley

Because we're all a little dramatic like Todd sometimes.
175683
views

The last 3-4 weeks of every college student’s semester are always crazy hectic. We have last minute assignments, group projects, and exams all squeezed into the last few weeks before break.

Sometimes we all need a little humor, and sometimes we are all a little dramatic, so why not experience the last few weeks of the semester as told by the king of drama himself, Todd Chrisley of Chrisley Knows Best.

1. Sitting in class listening to your professor explain upcoming assignments/exams.

2. When your group project members refuse to do anything until the night before it's due or just show up the day of to present.


3. When you and your roommate try to cook with whatever few ingredients you have left in stock.

Because we definitely want to avoid going to the grocery store at the end of the semester if we can.

4. When your parents get tired of you calling them about every little inconvenience in your life.

5. Sitting down to work on assignments.


6. Your thoughts when the professor is telling you what they want from you out of an assignment.


7. When you've had about 30 mental breakdowns in 2 days.

8. Trying to search out the class for the right group members.

9. The last few days of classes where everyone and everything is getting on your nerves.

10. When your friend suggests going out but you're just done with the world.

11. This. On the daily.

12. When all you want to do is snuggle up and watch Christmas movies.


13. Studying and realizing you know nothing.


14. When your finals are over and it's finally time to go home for break.


You're finally back to your old self.

Cover Image Credit: Instagram

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

12 Classics That All College Students Should Read

Reading is important — yet many people forget about books.

37
views

These are the classics that I think all college students should read.

1. "Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger

This classic by J.D. Salinger is a staple for many high school kids. Yet, I believe college students should revisit this novel, as it's a great portrayal of adolescence.

2. "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald 

Love him or hate him, Jay Gatsby is one of literature's most recognizable characters. "The Great Gatsby" is a tragic story of a man stuck in the past, and a grim warning of the empty happiness money buys.

3. "The Time Machine" by H.G. Wells

H.G. Wells was far beyond his time. His novel, "The Time Machine," explores what would happen if time-travelling could happen. It's both an evocative and frightening tale, full of important philosophical questions.

4. "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde 

This novel is about the degradation of Dorian Gray, and his descent into depravity. It showcases one of the greatest character declines in literature. By the end, Dorian Gray finds his life to be empty, his hedonistic lifestyle pointless.

5. "Norwegian Wood" by Haruki Murakami 

Haruki Murakami is famous for his surreal novels. "Norwegian Wood" follows a college student in Japan, as he navigates life after a tragedy. It's both beautiful yet melancholy. If nothing else, it'll get you listening to the Beatles' Norwegian Wood.

6. "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte 

I consider "Jane Eyre" to be one of the first feminist novels. It's a fantastic Gothic novel about an independent and strong woman — Jane Eyre — who meets the mysterious Mr. Rochester. It's more than a romance — it's a commentary on Victorian societal expectations of women, with Jane representing objection to it.

7. "The Book Thief" by Markus Zusak

This novel is a beautiful story about a girl in Nazi Germany. Liesel Meminger knows the importance of books, and uses her knowledge and kindness to save a Jewish refugee. It's a poignant novel that expresses the importance of literature and books.

8. Any Sherlock Holmes mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

If you've watched the Sherlock series with Benedict Cumberbatch, then you should definitely give the novels a go. The mysteries are exciting and intriguing, despite their old age.

9. "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens

This is one of my absolute favorites novels. It follows a young boy named Pip, who befriends a beggar, meets the depraved Miss Havisham, and falls in love with unattainable Estella. This novel is at once a bildungsroman and a tragedy.

10.  "Lolita" by Vladimir Nabokov 

This controversial novel by Vladimir Nobokov follows the perspective of Humbert Humbert, a depraved man who falls in love with 12-year-old Lolita. Nobokov showcases his mastery of the English language, while writing a depraved and tragic story following two terrible people.

11.  "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen

Perhaps one of the most famous novels of all time, "Pride and Prejudice" stands the test of time by showing how two outwardly opposite and contrary people can come together and form an amazing love. It's about accepting one's flaws and getting to know people beyond surface level.

12.  "All Quiet on the Western Front" by Erich Maria Remarque

This is a fantastic novel that depicts the absolute horrors of war, particularly World War I. If this doesn't enlighten you about the realities and horrors of war, then no book will.

Reading is important as it broadens one's horizon. Literature is one of the greatest inventions of mankind.

Related Content

Facebook Comments