14 Pieces Of Advice I Have Learned Throughout My Life

14 Pieces Of Advice I Have Learned Throughout My Life

I live my life by this advice.

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I have been incredibly lucky to have people in my life who give me endless amounts of advice in any situation. Whether the advice is coming from my parents, friends, church leaders, or teachers, it has all helped me throughout my life. This list contains just a few pieces of advice I have been given throughout the years.

1. "Who cares! Just sing it!" Age 16

I'm a terrible singer. I used to hate signing out loud, but after one of my mentors told me "Who cares! Just sing it!" I have loved breaking out into songs at any moment throughout the day.

2. "Being short does not mean you can't do something. Get a ladder." Age 15

My whole life I have been one of the smallest. With being short comes struggling to reach the top shelf, being able to see, and people believing your real age. One day, I was complaining about my height and a pal told me this simple line.

3. "Don't let your past claim you." Age 13

Prior to junior high, I struggled a lot with personal things. As time went on, I made that who I was instead of letting it be a part of my story. It became my name more than anything else. I was sat down and this was spoken to me.

4. "Don't let people tell you who you are, especially strangers." Age 13

This one goes way back. I don't want to sound stereotypical or anything, but I'm pretty weird. Alright, maybe not weird but I'm not afraid to be who I am. I have had people comment on this, some mean, some nice. Those people don't get to decide who I am, though.

5. "You get to decide what you're afraid of." Age 18

This one hit me hard. Change is terrifying to me, so this was perfect to hear at 18.

6. "Let people help you." Age 17

Gosh. This is hard for me. I am pretty independent. I like to accomplish things by myself a lot of the time. What I have learned over time, though, it is hard to do everything by yourself. Even writing an Odyssey article cannot be done alone! There are things that I either miss or mess up completely! We all need help!

7. "How do you want to be remembered?" Age 18

Yes, this is a question, but it is a piece of advice. It is a reminder for me. Am I who I want to be?

8. "Be careful with your heart." Age 17

A quote I hear (and say) a lot is "Boys are dumb." We or I don't say this because I want to be mean. It is more-so said because boys (and girls) will break your heart even if you were never in a relationship. I'm going to stick with my dog. He'll never break my heart.

9. "Just dance." Age 19

I'm a horrible dancer. Seriously and truly a terrible dancer. I am the epitome of a stereotypical white person dancing. It's horrible, but I still love it, and it brings me so much joy. So, I'm going to dance.

10. "What do you think of when you think about him?" Age 19

This is another question, but the advice within the answer of this question is so good. Is my answer joyful or is it harmful?

11. "It's your future. Do what you want to do." Age 16

I have this wild dream of working for a hockey team as my career. Some people think it's crazy and will never work out. Others are behind me 100% with it. Even when someone says, "you know there's a lot of work with that." I remind myself of what one of my pals told me a while ago.

`12. "Don't do anything you're going to regret." Age 20

Classic. Thanks, Dad.

13. "Can't is a state of mind." Age 15

I learned this one when I was in high school. It has stuck with me all these years. It is something I will tell myself forever. I have to give a shoutout to teachers and future teachers. Believe in your students.

14. "Don't date a boy who likes Notre Dame." Age 4

My dad told me this when I was four. He sat me on the stool in our kitchen and preached it out. I was simply a confused four-year-old who did not care one bit about football, and I thought boys were gross.

This advice has helped me out a lot in life. It has helped me to succeed. It has helped me become who I am supposed to be. It has also helped me to realize it is okay to ask for help.

Cover Image Credit:

Christine Lee

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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Life As An Only Child Is Not All Gifts And Rainbows

It's not as easy as it seems

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Not only am I an only child, but I'm an only child with two only children for parents, so my family is very small. Which means I don't have too many allies within my family other than my grandparents and parents. Which, during a divorce can be pretty hard in terms of who to lean on. The one thing I had wished for during this time of my life was to have a sibling who could go through it with me. Most people think being an only child seems amazing. You get all the love, attention, money, gifts, etc. But it is not these things.

Yes, I got attention, but I got so much of it to the point where now in my adult life I crave that kind of constant, undivided attention that people simply do not give you. Of course, being the center of attention in your family was great as a child, but it can also be a lot of pressure. Being a golden-child is not an easy thing to live up to; in fact, it's almost impossible.

Being an only child is also very lonely. Lonely because there is a part of you that craves being alone because you became so used to it, but also lonely because there's no one in your family who relates to you on a close level. My mom and I are best friends, basically sisters, but ultimately she is still my mom. When she had to parent me often times (mostly in my teenage years) it would cause a strain because it is hard to be parented by someone who you are that close with (and when you're a bratty teenager).

People also typically have bad connotations of only children. We're spoiled brats who never learned the lessons that having siblings teaches you. While the second part may be true, we also learned lessons that having siblings can't teach you. And we are certainly not all spoiled brats. I was admittedly very spoiled as a kid, but I was not a brat for it. Being literally the only grandkid, the only person to spoil by everyone in the family, it is easy to understand why I would be.

So before you walk around deciding that being an only child is the way to go, just remember that it's not as easy as you think. It's very different than having siblings, and not only in good ways. Be thankful for your brothers and sisters, because there's a kid out there wishing that they had one (only sometimes though, let's not get too crazy).

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