If there's one thing the hit TV show, "The Bachelor" knows what to do, it generates an audience. People gather every week to root on their favorite contestants and cross their fingers for some petty girl fights and a shocking elimination. The show has fantasy football-inspired bracket leagues, countless wine nights, and tons of girls forcing their boyfriend to watch with them the 2-hour episodes each week.

Although the extravagant dates, handsome men, and over-the-top romantic gestures have people everywhere wanting a relationship as good as the current season, "The Bachelor" is the worst indication of anything close to #RelationshipGoals.

When the show started, it was fun and intriguing. The concept of actually being able to find your soul mate through a reality TV stunt didn't seem realistic until the contestants were people you could relate to.

Whether it's the single mother, the recent college graduate, or the woman that's devoted to her career, every member of the audience can find someone they see themselves in. With everyone participating in each season striving for the same goal (love) after striking out too many times, it's hard to believe anyone would ever be there for the wrong reasons, right?

I beg to differ.

Besides the extensive casting process to see who is compatible for the lucky Bachelorette or Bachelor, as the seasons of the shows go on, the contestants seem to get crazier and crazier. It's safe to say that every season is bound to include a money- and fame-hungry person who might just want the exposure of the show for benefit in their professional lives rather than personal.

The show features around 30 contestants and the show takes around two months to film. So, let's get this straight. The Bachelor is supposed to find his soulmate in a two-month span, spend equal time with each woman, and eventually commit himself to her for the rest of their lives at the end of it?

Uh, please tell me I'm not the only one who thinks it's a little crazy. In retrospect, spending an equal amount of time with each of the contestants is far from possible. In the end, each of the women doesn't stand a chance if they don't make a significant first impression.

Though the constant filming of the show can lead viewers to believe what they are seeing is raw and relatable, the show's producers definitely have a flair for the dramatic and can edit the show how they please to portray characters in some of the contestants.

Not everything is what meets the eye, especially in show business. Most of the staging is almost too obvious to the common viewer. I mean come on, you really want me to believe you casted this girl without knowing she had a boyfriend? Good TV material.

One of the highlights of the show is the women get to travel around the world and have dates that resemble the grandest of romantic gestures. From climbing buildings, cruises, and hiking, you're bound to be disappointed by any Netflix and chilling if there's a season going on. It seems like every date with every girl is a honeymoon, so what does this tell us about relationships? If they aren't this extravagant, they aren't that authentic?

While the show is entertaining, it ingrains a somewhat unrealistic and unhealthy image of what love is. You can't be expected to be flown on private jets to establish a meaningful connection with someone in such a brief period of time. In the rare instance of a couple staying together after being on the show, I can only give the show props for introducing them, not for establishing their relationship.

Don't model your relationship goals after something made to entertain. While the cheesiness and excessive romanticism make for an addictive binge, make sure you watch the show through a realistic lens. Also, pro tip: spare yourself from the lengthy episodes and just google the winner. It will save you a lot of time that you won't get back.