7 Ways Worry-Warts Can Become More Chill

7 Ways Worry-Warts Can Become More Chill

Steps to take when worrying becomes your key trait.
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Worry-warts are always jealous of chill people because unlike the nice and relaxed, easygoing half of the population, the worriers become anxious about trivial matters, and constantly assume that they will be that 1 percent when it comes to something going wrong. If you happen to be a person losing valuable sleep over such matters, then here are a few ways you can transform into a chill person–or at least someone who doesn’t worry quite as much.

1. Find a hobby or something that you enjoying doing to occupy your mind.

There’s a reason why Benjamin Franklin once said, “It is the working man who is the happy man. It is the idle man who is the miserable man.” Oftentimes when you are sitting around and doing nothing, random and unnecessary thoughts can flood into your head. The best way to stop thinking about things that you know logically are silly, is to immerse yourself into an activity that you enjoy doing. Bottom line is: keep yourself busy.

2. Work out.

We all know the physical benefits of working out–it gets rid of the aches and pains of a lazy bum and instead gives us the aches and pains of spazzing calf muscles and a sore stomach whenever we cough or laugh. But in all seriousness, working out not only benefits us physically by keeping our hearts healthy and pumping, but also mentally because it improves our self-esteem. Then there’s also the fact that if you maintain a consistent workout routine (for example if you often go for runs), your body will release endorphins, which will make your brain realize how happy you are (to put it in layman’s terms).

3. Eat healthy.

Eating healthy along with working out will in total make you feel like a million bucks. And if you feel a certain way, it is inevitable that you will radiate the same positivity in your actions–all of which will make you into a more chill person.

4. Go out and interact.

Oftentimes worry-warts live inside their heads. This can all change if you find the courage to go out there, meet up with a bunch of people, and have some (responsible) fun. Trust me, when you’re out and about with a group of people you enjoy being with, there will be hilarious stories shared and there will be a lot of laughter. Whether there’s science behind it or not, laughing is, no doubt, therapeutic–so much so that you won’t even remember that you were obsessing over whether or not you wrote your name on that exam from the afternoon, and how, if you didn’t, your professor will probably deduct 10 points. (But chances are you wrote your name.)

5. Control your internet usage.

If you become anxious over every little thing that is different about you or freak out because you have a symptom that matches up with one of WebMD’s prognoses–then step away from the screen and breathe. In times of constant panicking and worrying, the Internet is not your friend.

6. Become best friends with someone super chill.

When I say super chill, I don’t mean someone who is super relaxed because they got themselves a little bit of that Juanita (look it up if you don’t know what I’m saying). I mean someone whose outlook on life is almost annoyingly positive. Someone who is logically cautious yet knows how to have fun and see the best in various situations. Someone who will talk and talk and fill your mind with positive thoughts, yet someone who will also listen to your rants and random thoughts. (Side note: this is the best friend you need to hold onto.)

7. Talk to a professional, go to psychological counseling, etc.

If your worrying is severely affecting your eating or sleeping habits, if it’s negatively affecting how you interact with your friends or others, or if it’s ruining your overall ability to function properly–that’s a serious matter. In that case, you’re not a worry-wart, but you do have an anxiety issue that should not be taken lightly; not to worry, though, (we all need some humor in our lives) because this can be resolved with the help of a counselor or a therapist. I guarantee that they will be able to give you the help and support you need.

If you are a Brandeis student, going to the Psychological Counseling Center (or calling them to speak to someone or make an appointment for a session: 781-736-3730) will serve you well. If you happen to be a student from a different school, definitely contact a counselor there or go to the counseling center available on your campus.

Cover Image Credit: https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&ved=0CAcQjRxqFQoTCNyD0qeVz8cCFUs7PgodUb8CDw&url=http%3A%2F%2Ftworiversblog.com%2F2013%2F04%2F08%2Fworry-you-will-not-stop-me%2F&ei=xBriVdyRLcv2-AHR_op4&psig=AFQjCNEBEI0tNDTtBlOrXTxwmAfBJ7IUKw&ust=1440967700989220

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Bailey Posted A Racist Tweet, But That Does NOT Mean She Deserves To Be Fat Shamed

As a certified racist, does she deserve to be fat shamed?
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This morning, I was scrolling though my phone, rotating between Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube and Snapchat again, ignoring everyone's snaps but going through all the Snapchat subscription stories before stumbling on a Daily Mail article that piqued my interest. The article was one about a teen, Bailey, who was bullied for her figure, as seen on the snap below and the text exchange between Bailey and her mother, in which she begged for a change of clothes because people were making fun of her and taking pictures.

Like all viral things, quickly after her text pictures and harassing snaps surfaced, people internet stalked her social media. But, after some digging, it was found that Bailey had tweeted some racist remark.

Now, some are saying that because Bailey was clearly racist, she is undeserving of empathy and deserves to be fat-shamed. But does she? All humans, no matter how we try, are prejudiced in one way or another. If you can honestly tell me that you treat everyone with an equal amount of respect after a brief first impression, regardless of the state of their physical hygiene or the words that come out of their mouth, either you're a liar, or you're actually God. Yes, she tweeted some racist stuff. But does that mean that all hate she receives in all aspects of her life are justified?

On the other hand, Bailey was racist. And what comes around goes around. There was one user on Twitter who pointed out that as a racist, Bailey was a bully herself. And, quite honestly, everyone loves the downfall of the bully. The moment the bullies' victims stop cowering from fear and discover that they, too, have claws is the moment when the onlookers turn the tables and start jeering the bully instead. This is the moment the bully completely and utterly breaks, feeling the pain of their victims for the first time, and for the victims, the bully's demise is satisfying to watch.

While we'd all like to believe that the ideal is somewhere in between, in a happy medium where her racism is penalized but she also gets sympathy for being fat shamed, the reality is that the ideal is to be entirely empathetic. Help her through her tough time, with no backlash.

Bullies bully to dominate and to feel powerful. If we tell her that she's undeserving of any good in life because she tweeted some racist stuff, she will feel stifled and insignificant and awful. Maybe she'll also want to make someone else to feel as awful as she did for some random physical characteristic she has. Maybe, we might dehumanize her to the point where we feel that she's undeserving of anything, and she might forget the preciousness of life. Either one of the outcomes is unpleasant and disturbing and will not promote healthy tendencies within a person.

Instead, we should make her feel supported. We all have bad traits about ourselves, but they shouldn't define us. Maybe, through this experience, she'll realize how it feels to be prejudiced against based off physical characteristics. After all, it is our lowest points, our most desperate points in life, that provide us with another perspective to use while evaluating the world and everyone in it.

Cover Image Credit: Twitter / Bailey

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Stop Stigmatizing Your Own Mental Illness

Yes, things will get better, but only if you let them.

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It may just be the Aquarius in me, but in the thick of a semester, I'm rather detached from any lucidity of my emotions.

Whether it be the stigma surrounding the topic or simply prioritizing other things above it, checking in with ourselves often takes a backseat to quite literally anything else.

As you'd expect, even just temporarily ignoring a potentially bigger issue only gives it the time and space to fester. And after a certain amount of time, I've found it very difficult to even gauge what I was feeling when I finally allowed myself to.

Within me, I had known for a while that something was off. But I didn't want to admit it to myself, and God forbid anyone else.

I certainly didn't view anyone else as weaker because of a mental illness; in fact, seeing them push through their toughest of days and revel in their best ones was admirable, to say the least. To own the difficulties they endured instead of being surprised when they surfaced at the most inopportune times.

That honesty as a strength.

This year has been incredibly progressive in bringing awareness to mental health, but the stigma is still alive and well within us. Perhaps those without mental illness have trouble understanding what it's like to exist as those who have them, but the root of the issue that still lingers, is in trying to validate our own struggles.

Sometimes this can be as serious as denying the resources that can allow us to live contented lives. And to protect what—our fear of vulnerability? Why do we deprive ourselves of the help that we know has worked for so many others? I choose to believe that first and foremost, it's due to the misconception that seeking help makes us less than who we would be if we just powered through these obstacles.

But the truth of the matter is, is that this route is typically much more emotionally taxing. I know for a fact that I would not be where I am today without loved ones to lean on, the occasional "mental health day," and my daily 10 milligrams of Prozac.

Self-awareness is the first step towards that place—and an awfully ugly step at that. I wish I could say that it's "all downhill from there," but I don't think it'll ever be linear since it never was, to begin with.

It took a little longer than I would've liked to get here, but you know, it's sunnier here than where I was.

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