22 Pieces Of Advice For The College Class Of '22, From Current College Students

22 Pieces Of Advice For The College Class Of '22, From Current College Students

"Don't give up quite yet."
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Being a high school senior is one of the most exciting yet intimidating times in someone's life. One door is about to close, but so many more are just about to open.

The college application and acceptance processes are when reality finally set in for me when I was a high school senior, and the nerves started really kicking in. High school seniors, have no fear, college really isn't as terrifying as some make it out to be.

Here are 22 pieces of advice about college from current college students that I wish someone told me when I was in your shoes.

1. "Don't give up quite yet." -Mollee, Freshman at King's College

2. "Make sure you have enough time throughout your day to study and read for at least an hour to avoid falling behind. Also, keep up on your work and readings for class so you don't feel overwhelmed once exams come around." - Sheridan, Sophmore at Misericordia University

3. "Don't take anything for granted. Things will change and you will become a completely different person - and that's okay." -Brianna, Freshman at Kutztown University

4. "Pick a college that will best suit your needs. For example, if you're someone who likes to ask questions in class, pick a college with smaller class sizes. If you aren't someone who doesn't need or like to ask questions, a larger college may be a better fit for you." -Abby, Freshman at Keuka College

5. "Don't settle on a college/University just because you meet some cool people who are also going there. People change, you change, pick a school for YOU, not anyone else!" -Julia, Sophomore at Bloomsburg University

6. "Graduation day will be here before you know it. Don't waste any time and take every opportunity given to you! And please go to your senior prom. Even if you think you won't, you'll regret not going." -Katarina, Sophomore at Bloomsburg University

7. "The people you were best friends with in high school may not be your friends once everyone goes off to college, and that's okay. Don't stress about things you can't change because you can't force anything. Your life is about to get so much better, I promise." -Danielle, Freshman at Bloomsburg University

8. "Have fun! Take lots of pictures because you will cherish them as you are missing home in the fall. Also, college isn't as scary as everyone says it is, just be nice." -McKensie, Freshman at Keystone College

9. "Learn how to manage your time wisely." -Karamvir, Freshman at Marywood University

10. "It can be intimidating to arrive on campus as a freshman knowing almost nobody, but just be yourself, and you'll make friends in no time at all." -Zach, Junior at Bloomsburg University

11. "Enjoy EVERY moment because you never seem to realize how much the little things in high school tend to mean the most in the end. From being with your best friends that you grew up with everyday to playing your favorite sport and or participating in your favorite activity. After you graduate, everyone parts ways and a new beginning is awaiting. Although you may be counting down to graduation, you’ll forever have the memories and experiences from high school that you could cherish and look back at for the rest of your life. You are close to closing one chapter of your life, which is where another one is waiting to be open to new experiences. College is a huge adjustment, though, but just stay calm and enjoy everything about it." -Jordan, Sophomore at Keystone College

12. "Have fun making memories with your family and friends while you are home, but do not slack off now. Acceptance letters and scholarships are going to mean so much more to you than you think. You’ve made it this far. Keep going and finish strong!" -Jesse, Freshman at Marywood University

13. "You're going to be nervous and think everyone is either looking at or judging you for being the 'new kid.' No one really cares, just do you. -Gianna, Freshman at Penn State University Worthington

14. "Don't over estimate your knowledge, or underestimate your capabilities. You'll think you know it all, and then you'll fail your first exam, however, you're still capable of pulling that C to an A. You're capable of amazing things you didn't know you were." -Jessie, Freshman at Elizabethtown College

15. "Don't be afraid to take risks. There are only so many chances you'll get to make real connections with people and if you're too shy, you're going to miss it. Also, don't be afraid to ask your professor about your work and don't be scared to ask for tutoring if you need it." -Joe, Freshman at Penn State University

16. "Enjoy the ride." -Ryan, Freshman at Bloomsburg University

17. "Do lots of research to find out what field you want to go into. You don't have to know specifics, but definitely pick a general area of study." -Jess, Freshman at Temple University

18. "Enjoy it. Regardless of if these last few days are your “golden days,” make the most of them. It’s the last time all of the people you grew up with will gather, whether you hate them or love them, try to cherish it, cut loose ends, find closure. Overall, just have fun and make memories that you can look back on when you’re older." -Dan, Freshman at Bloomsburg University

19. "Never be afraid to reach out for help in your classes. Go to your professor’s office hours and use your school’s tutoring services if it’s provided. It will help you so much in the long run, take advantage of what you can to help you flourish in your academics!" -Brooke, Sophomore at Bloomsburg University

20. "Try to stay focused as much as you can." -Sean, Freshman at Marywood University

21. "Don't be afraid to put yourself out there. Even if you think you'll make a fool of yourself, do it anyway and try something new. You have to make all new friends and create a whole new identity - it's a once in a lifetime chance so don't let it go to waste." -Karly, Freshman at Bloomsburg University

22. "There are people you haven't met yet who will love you more than those you have known your entire life. Everyone is just as nervous as you are about making friends, just be yourself and you'll be flourishing in no time at all. Also, your professors have office hours for a reason, go to them! Take advantage of all that your college/university has to offer, you don't want to look back on your time in college and be able to say "what if I did this?" or "I wish I did that." -Oriana, Freshman at Bloomsburg University

Cover Image Credit: Roanoke University

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To All Student-Athletes Beginning Their Respective Seasons, Remember Why You Play

You are going to get tired. You are going to get worn out...

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Dear athlete,

The season is by far the most exciting time of the year. Big plays, good memories, traveling new places, and winning championships... But yet another promise is that season is also exhausting.

You are going to get tired. You are going to get worn out...

But remember that this season of your life doesn't last forever. Remind yourself why you play.

You play this sport because you love the game. You love the competition, you love your teammates and the friendships that you've formed, you love the lessons you learn aside from the physical aspect.

So each day, continue to choose the game.

It's not easy. But if it was, everyone would do it. But discomfort is where progress happens.

Quit dreading practices, quit wishing for rain, quit complaining about conditioning, and quit taking for granted a busy schedule that is literally made just for you. Tens of thousands of young girls and boys would do anything to be in the position (literally) that you are in. Take advantage of being a role model to those young kids who think the world of you.

Freshmen, this is what you have wanted for so long. Take advantage of the newness, take advantage of the advice, encouragement, and constructive criticism that your older teammates give you. Soak it all in, four years goes by really quickly.

Sophomores, you now know how it works. Be confident in your abilities, yet continue to learn and grow mentally and in your position.

Juniors, prepare to take the lead. Use this season to, of course, continue to sharpen your skill, but also recognize that you're over halfway done, so mentally and physically ready yourself to take the seniors' lead next year.

Seniors, this is it. Your last year of playing the sport that you love. Be a good leader, motivate, and leave your mark on the program in which you have loved for so long. Encourage the athletes behind you to continue the traditions and standards set by the program. Lay it all on the field, leave it all on the court, and leave your program better than you found it.

Take the season one day at a time and, each day, make it your goal to get better. Get better for your team, for you pushing yourself makes everyone else work even harder. So even if you don't get a lot of playing time, make your teammates better by pushing yourself so hard that they have no other choice than to push themselves too. And when a team has every single player pushing themselves to the max, success happens.

Take advantage of this time with your teammates and coaches, for they won't be your teammates and coaches forever.

No matter what year you are and no matter what your role is this season... GROW. You are an integral part of your team and your program.

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A Little Glimpse Into What It's Like To Grieve In Your 20s

Debunking the stigma behind grief in the everyday young adult

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A few days before last semester my little brother, Ethan, took his life. After years of him struggling to find his place in the world, he put his troubles and sorrows to rest. I had just moved into my sorority house to begin my Junior year, and a few days later I awakened late at night with several missed calls and messages. My dad texted me saying, "Ethan passed away Blair, dad is so sorry." When I first read the text, I had to keep reminding myself that it was real. Shortly after receiving that, my parents and family friends came to bring me home from school.

The next few days were filled with a roller coaster of emotions. I was reuniting with old friends and community members for days on end while we were all trying to understand the immense pain that my brother had felt. Soon, I went back to school because I knew that even in times of tragedy, life goes on. Above all else, I knew it's what my brother would have wanted. Being back at school is/was interesting. I felt like I was being judged by everyone for returning to school so early. I was in no way ready to discuss my family's recent tragedy, and I am still not ready to discuss it, yet people insist on asking for information regarding my brother's death. Despite this, the people around me continuously promised to support me when I was feeling sad or hopeless. The weeks after Ethan's death had me in a complete fog, making it hard to focus even to this day.

Fortunately, not many people have to deal with the death of a sibling at such a young age. Subsequently, many are not sure how to handle such a thing. I am often at a loss for words for what this experience feels like. Often times I feel bad that people don't know how to respond to me. Grief is something I would never wish upon someone.

Even on the days I feel alone, I know that there are people here to support me.

It means the world to me when people reach out and ask how I am doing, or to meet up with me for something as simple as ice cream. I appreciate this more than one knows.

On top of dealing with my brother's death I was dealing with rejection from a boy for the first time. Rejection of any kind is difficult, and is something everyone experiences in their life. Although I have felt rejection in many forms, especially being an aspiring actress, this was the first from a potential suiter. The loss of any friendship has been so hard after losing my brother. It has been hard to process other aspects of my life, and especially the crazy life of dating and being a 20-year-old in college. Moving on, and separating my grief from that rejection has been no easy feat.

As my semester was coming to a close, I ran into the boy I was interested in at a holiday party. This time of year had proven to be hard for me when I thought of the happy times spent with my brother during the holidays. That night was the first time I was unable to compose myself and put my best face forward being the actress I am. I couldn't hide my emotions anymore and I was overcome with grief. I had hit rock bottom. This journey has consisted of immeasurable self-doubt and soul searching.

Soon after the holiday party, I was told by someone who has been an authoritative figure to me, that "I was grieving weirdly" and that I "should go home for the rest of semester and take an incomplete". There were only two weeks left of the semester and my grades were great. I was so deeply offended by this notion, and that they had the audacity to judge the way I was grieving. I have been trying my best, and that is all that I can do. Despite this toxic conversation, I finished out the semester strong and took my well-deserved three-week break. My break was filled with much needed respite, creative inspiration, and time to collect my thoughts.

Coming back to school, I had an open conversation with my community on the reasonable steps they could take to support me in my journey for the rest of the school year. All someone that is grieving asks, is for you to sympathize with them. Thankfully, it was received well and I look forward to my upcoming semester.

There is often a stigma behind people who are actively grieving. Yes, I am going through a lot, yes, I am sad. But that doesn't mean I am incapable of loving life and experiencing things going on around me at school or in my life. This especially includes dating. I have learned that it is okay to embrace my feelings and express them in whatever way I deem fit. Grieving the loss of my brother has also made me stronger than ever. I can handle anything and I am ready to make my impact on the world.

Everyone experiences pain, struggle, grief, etc. What matters most, is how they come out of it. I want to continue the message of kindness. I am so grateful for my newfound bravery and at the end of the day, I will always miss my brother's unique perspective and outstanding sense of humor. If he were here today, first he'd probably roast me and then I know he would only want the best for me. In the end I plan to live my happiest life.

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