It's 2019, And I've Already Had My First Depressive Episode

It's 2019, And I've Already Had My First Depressive Episode

Mental health is my main priority for this year

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I wasn't feeling anything close to empty on New Year's Eve. The sparkle and shine distracted me and by the time noon came the next day, a rug was pulled from under my heels and I felt empty.

I hadn't dealt with an episode like this in a while and didn't expect 2019 to begin with trying to pull myself out of a hole I didn't dig. I found myself on a bathroom floor crying my eyes out, calling my boyfriend to vent. I felt disgusting and unproductive. The idea of the new year equivocating to a fresh start is something that has always troubled me. You can't put a blanket over everything that has happened in the past year, especially something as fragile as mental health. Still, nothing from my past could have prepared me for an episode like this. I found myself stuck in my head, feeling no self-worth, and no happiness. The only thing I wanted to do was go to bed and even with that, I didn't get to sleep till nearly 3 in the morning. I tend to put an immense amount of pressure on myself in these situations to get happy and tough it out, but sometimes that just isn't possible.

My resolution for this year is to put my mental health first and to seek help when I need it. Always remember you don't have to go through anything alone and there is always someone who is going through something similar. You don't need a new year to put your mental health first. Whether you are reading this in January or July, mental health should never be put to the side and it should always be a priority. If you are reading this and are dealing with mental health I support you and hope you find the support you need. 2019 will be the year of prioritizing mental health.

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A History Lesson On The 'Father of Radio,' Lee De Forest

A trip back in time to the origin behind the creator of live radio broadcasting.

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The "father of radio," the "grandfather of television," the man who created live radio broadcasting, Lee de Forest was a man who forever changed the history of radio and television. Lee de Forest was born on August 26th of 1873, in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Furthermore, he was the son of a Congregational minister who had a presidential position at Talladega College, a bankrupt school with mostly African Americans. Lucky for Lee, he fit in perfectly as part of the community. Lee's father wanted a career for him in the clergy, but Lee preferred science which led to his enrollment in the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University in 1893. Within six years, Lee was working many jobs, making the best out of his scholarship and the best out of his allowance from his parents to later achieve his Ph.D. in 1899 in physics.

Around 1899, electricity started to be an interest to Lee, specifically electromagnetic- wave propagation."De Forest's doctoral dissertation on the "Reflection of Hertzian Waves from the Ends of Parallel Wires" was possibly the first doctoral thesis in the United States on the subject that was later to become known as radio" (E. Fielding, Raymond). Lee began to work at the Western Electric Company in Chicago, starting off in the telephone section and leading him to the experimental laboratory. Furthermore, working after hours granted Lee with his first invention, an electrolytic detector of Hertzian waves, which became moderately successful. In 1902, De Forest founded the De Forest Wireless Telegraph Company to allow a new medium of communication to be born and spread to the press, military, businesses, and the people. Wireless telegraphy was the route of creation De Forest took, leading him to create the "Audion" because of his dedication to this new form of communication.

The Audion was a more evolved detector; it had a stronger reception towards wireless signals than Carborundum and electrolytic detectors. Furthermore, in 1907 Lee began to take advantage of his invention by broadcasting music and speech to the people living in the New York City area. Although with his newly made invention, also came the downfalls in Lee's life. He was defrauded twice by business partners, involved in many patent lawsuits, had four unsuccessful marriages, and was indicted for mail fraud, which was later acquitted. Furthermore, Lee fell victim to many failed inventions and had a hard time trying to convey his new medium.

On the contrary, in 1910 was Lee's first broadcast of any sort of performance. Specifically, it was a live performance of opera, sung by Enrico Caruso at the Metropolitan Opera. This broadcast allowed Lee to share his new medium with the general public and to get ideas on how his creation could evolve.

Eventually, by 1912, de Forest began to have many Audion tubes to amplify high-frequency radio signals to far areas. "He fed the output from the plate of one tube through a transformer to the grid of a second, the output of the second tube's plate to the grid of a third, and so forth, which thereby allowed for an enormous amplification of a signal that was originally very weak"(E. Fielding, Raymond). The more modifications the Audion had, the better its impact on radio, as the transmitting and amplification of radio signals towards farther distances grew stronger allowing telephonic distance communication to evolve.

Through the success of his invention, Lee began to create controversy around scientists and attorneys, eventually selling patents to communication firms for further development. Moreover, the American Telephone & Telegraph Company (AT&T;) installed audions to amplify voice signals all across the United States of America, changing the development of radio.

In 1921, de Forest began producing audio and recordings for movies. He created a recording system titled "Phonofilm," which led to him starting the "De Forest Phonofilm Corporation." Although the quality of the system was mediocre, the optical recording system was shown in many theaters from 1923 to 1927. His method was put off by many film producers as they rejected his sound-on-film device, because of the evolution of film and the use of talking pictures. Ironically, producers in the past did not want to use De Forests device, because they did not believe in it, but as years passed, movies began to use De Forests method of sound recording and many are still influenced by his methods today.

Overall, Lee De Forest died with over 300 patents and has signified his spot in the history of radio and television and is one of the principal inventors of today. He allowed the ease of amplifying radio signals, coast to coast services to be created all across the world, and is credited for bringing sound to motion pictures.

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5 Opera Songs For People Who Don't Like Opera

Don't like Opera but want to like it? Check these classics out!

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Opera is complicated.

The singing is loud and deep. The lyrics aren't in English and they don't bother to translate them in America. The plot and characters of Opera are so exaggerated and ridiculous by today's standards. And every male character is an a-hole and every female character brutally dies at the end.

That being said, there are still plenty of reasons to love opera when done right. It's one of the most compelling and intense forms of entertainment and has the power to suck you in.

If you want to find some opera songs to help you get hooked onto the genre, here are some classics.

1. Nessun Dorma - "Turnadot"

Ok so here's the story: Luciano Pavarotti, the Michael Jordan of male Opera singers, was supposed to perform this opera classic at the 1998 Grammies but was too sick to sing that night. So at literally the very last second Aretha Franklin voluntarily took Pavoratti's place. Anyone who says that Aretha was overrated and didn't deserve the praise she got needs to see this. It may be the greatest moment in Grammy history.

2. Queen of the Night Aria - "The Magic Flute"

Hey, it's MOZART.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is the most iconic music composer of all-time because of his incredible ability to compose and construct a complex piece of music without ease.

Mozart has created plenty of great operas such as "The Marriage of Figaro", "Don Giovanni" and "The Abduction from the Seraglio", but maybe the best song from his operas is the Queen of the Night Aria from "The Magic Flute."

The lyrics of this beautifully sung piece are way darker than they appear as the evil Queen of the opera is forcing her daughter to kill her father. But it still doesn't take away from its power and grace.

3. La donna e' mobile - "Rigoletto"

Vocal legend Andrea Bocelli is one of many great singers to perform this overwhelming popular song from Verdi's opera based off a Victor Hugo story.

This wonderfully joyous sounding song is actually about the arrogant Duke of the opera bragging about how "fickle" women are. But don't worry about that because it's not in English so we can make the song how we want it to be.

4. Brindisi (The Drinking Song) - "La Traviata"

We obviously can't have a video performance on this list without the most famous opera singer ever (besides perhaps Maria Callas) in Luciano Pavarotti!

Thankfully this song is about as universal as it gets: Let's drink and have some fun tonight!

So why don't they play this in nightclubs as well?

5. La Habanera - "Carmen"

Ok, even if you've your life under a rock, you've heard of this song.

It's the most instantly recognizable song from arguably the most recognizable opera in "Carmen."

The song is nothing more than a display of the titular character's personality and intentions of the show, but it works so well way. Carmen seduces the audience the way she seduces her lustful supporting characters, but she's not really hiding anything.

You know what they say: Carmen is what you see, and Carmen is what you get.

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